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Intel's Ivy Bridge vs. Sandy Bridge Benchmarks Leaked

By - Source: xbit labs | B 86 comments

We get an early glimpse of the potential of the upcoming Ivy Bridge CPUs through initial benchmarks.

With the Intel's Ivy Bridge set to release around April 2012, Intel has reportedly begun sending official Ivy Bridge performance expectations to its partners, manufacturers and resellers. Xbit-labs has published a set of slides that are supposedly from Intel, but are not sanctioned for general public consumption. These could give us an early glimpse of what type of performance we might expect when Ivy Bridge hits the market.

The charts show the Intel Core i7-3770, which is a has 4 cores (8 threads) at 3.40 GHz, with 8MB L3 cache going up against the current Core i7-2600 with similar specifications.  

Image source: Xbit-labsImage source: Xbit-labs

According to the chart, there is an improvement across the board with the new Core i7-3770 processor. Intel states the improvement is due to improved architecture and a higher turbo boost performance. This may be attributed to the new 22nm 3D Tri-Gate technology utilized with the upcoming processors. 

  • 7% improvement in SYSmark 2012 score
  • 14% improvement in HDXPRT 2011 score
  • 15% improvement in Cinebench 11.5 score
  • 13% improvement in ProShow Gold 4.5 results
  • 25% improvement in Excel 2010 performance

   

Image source: Xbit-labsImage source: Xbit-labs

The charts also show the improvement Intel's HD Graphics 4000 offers over current gen integrated graphics. The improved HD Graphics 4000 features an enhanced AVX acceleration, support for DX11 & OpenCL 1.1, along with PCI-Express Gen 3.0.

  • 56% faster performance in ArcSoft Media Expresso
  • 192% higher overall 3DMark Vantage Performance Preset - Score
  • 17% faster performance in 3DMark Vantage Performance Preset - CPU benchmark
  • 199% faster performance in 3DMark Vantage Performance Preset - GPU benchmark

  

Stay tuned as hopefully more details trickle out on what type of gaming performance can be expected with the new Ivy Bridge processors.

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Top Comments
  • 32 Hide
    nordlead , December 1, 2011 10:24 PM
    would have been nice if they compared the HD4000 to the HD3000 instead of the HD2000.
  • 30 Hide
    bavman , December 1, 2011 10:09 PM
    If the price is the same then it'll be nice to purchase for a new build, but I dont think theres a significant increase in performance to justify an upgrade if you have a sandy bridge cpu.
  • 28 Hide
    makafri , December 1, 2011 10:11 PM
    so basically in cpu power is not a big leap... graphich wise is a little better... but well after all intel hd graphics are still shit...
Other Comments
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  • 30 Hide
    bavman , December 1, 2011 10:09 PM
    If the price is the same then it'll be nice to purchase for a new build, but I dont think theres a significant increase in performance to justify an upgrade if you have a sandy bridge cpu.
  • 28 Hide
    makafri , December 1, 2011 10:11 PM
    so basically in cpu power is not a big leap... graphich wise is a little better... but well after all intel hd graphics are still shit...
  • 25 Hide
    BlackHawk91 , December 1, 2011 10:15 PM
    I think the real benefit of Ivy Bridge is its OCing potential, while keeping low temps and power consumption.
  • 22 Hide
    nieur , December 1, 2011 10:15 PM
    not much attractive for gamers who already have sandybridge on chip GPU performance does't matter if you have discrete GPU
  • 32 Hide
    nordlead , December 1, 2011 10:24 PM
    would have been nice if they compared the HD4000 to the HD3000 instead of the HD2000.
  • -6 Hide
    LuckyDucky7 , December 1, 2011 10:28 PM
    So where are the REAL benchmarks?


    Where are the raw numbers? It can always be claimed that a processor is "25% faster" than the previous generation even when the truth isn't there- AMD seems to be good at this.

    Almost every benchmark up there has something to do with HD4000. ProShow's probably using Quick Sync since you're creating an MPEG-2 movie file.

    The only thing that remains a mystery to me is the Excel benchmark since that's the only one where HD4000 wouldn't skew the numbers. Or are there other accelerations in this CPU that Excel 2010 can use that aren't in Sandy Bridge?

    So yeah, it's a new architecture, but it doesn't seem to be a must-have upgrade from an i5-2500K.
  • -6 Hide
    danwat1234 , December 1, 2011 10:35 PM
    makafriso basically in cpu power is not a big leap... graphich wise is a little better... but well after all intel hd graphics are still shit...

    According to that chart, it's nearly 3x the performance, graphics wise compared to Sandy Bridge.
    Sandy Bridge can do about 4K on 3dmark06, and so think of 10K on 3dmark06 with Ivybridge, pretty darn good. Better than my Asus G50VT gaming laptop. Who knows if it really is that much better but that's what the marketing shows.
  • 3 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , December 1, 2011 10:39 PM
    Nice performance increase across the board, looks like ~10-15% on average. Very nice considering it's just a node shrink of Sandy Bridge and not a new architecture. I can't quite remember how much performance per clock improved from Conroe to Penryn, or from Bloomfield to Gulftown, but the increase in IPC seems to fall in line with what you'd expect to see. Combined with the significantly lower TDP, Ivy Bridge is shaping up to be a performance per W beast.
  • 4 Hide
    Travis Beane , December 1, 2011 10:40 PM
    Question is, if the Sandy bridge 2600k, for $369, is at 3.5GHz (3.9GHz turbo) at 95W, what can I expect in the 130W $350 range for Ivy Bridge?
    I paid $320 CAD for my i7-920 rev D-0, which is 2.66GHz stock but I run 3.7GHz on stock voltage. I bought it about two years ago (I think). Will I have any reason to replace my rig? I have a good enough PSU I can through in any card I want, and when overclocked my CPU bulls through anything I do.
    I had no reason to upgrade for Sandy Bridge. Will I have one for Ivy bridge, other than for increased amount of RAM slots? That is a tempting reason though. For the same price of a 3x2GB set when I built my system, I could buy a 6x4GB set now.

    This max TDP of 77W stuff better not be true! I live in a cold country; my i7 keeps me warm at night.
  • 17 Hide
    nordlead , December 1, 2011 10:43 PM
    Quote:
    According to that chart, it's nearly 3x the performance, graphics wise compared to Sandy Bridge.
    Sandy Bridge can do about 4K on 3dmark06, and so think of 10K on 3dmark06 with Ivybridge, pretty darn good. Better than my Asus G50VT gaming laptop. Who knows if it really is that much better but that's what the marketing shows.


    except they didn't compare it to he best that sandy bridge has to offer. They compared it to HD2000.
  • 3 Hide
    lipoly , December 1, 2011 10:46 PM
    Given these numbers include improvements to Turbo Boost (which I wouldn't use since I'd OC) its hard to tell what the real perf increase is. I'm limping along 'till Ivy Bridge (really only b/c I want PCIe 3.0 for future upgrades) but don't expect much over Sandy.
  • 15 Hide
    Zagen30 , December 1, 2011 10:54 PM
    tmk221tri-gate tech ? yeah right... marketing BS as always


    Did you even bother to click the link to the article about it? You should actually read about something before you deride it. I'm not sure why it's so hard to believe that a bunch of the highest-qualified engineers in the business came up with a new method of constructing transistors.
  • 14 Hide
    acerace , December 1, 2011 10:59 PM
    Quote:
    AMD is dead so Intel wants to compete against itself. haha


    Where did you get that info? AMD is not dead it just want to stop compete with Intel in desktop market.
  • 1 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , December 1, 2011 11:00 PM
    Travis BeaneQuestion is, if the Sandy bridge 2600k, for $369, is at 3.5GHz (3.9GHz turbo) at 95W, what can I expect in the 130W $350 range for Ivy Bridge?

    ?... since when was the i7-2600K $369? It's been around $315-$320 since release.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115070

    Travis BeaneI had no reason to upgrade for Sandy Bridge. Will I have one for Ivy bridge, other than for increased amount of RAM slots? That is a tempting reason though. For the same price of a 3x2GB set when I built my system, I could buy a 6x4GB set now.This max TDP of 77W stuff better not be true! I live in a cold country; my i7 keeps me warm at night.

    I think you may be a little confused. Ivy Bridge has a dual channel memory controller, as opposed to the triple channel on your i7-920, so you would actually have fewer DIMM slots then your current system. But this is irrelevant, as the increased efficiency in Sandy Bridge's memory controller allows it to achieve near parity with Bloomfield in terms of memory bandwidth, despite its narrower interface. And Sandy/Ivy Bridge is also capable of addressing higher density memory, up to 32GB (4x8GB) where as your current platform maxes out at 24GB (6x4GB).
  • 3 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , December 1, 2011 11:19 PM
    LuckyDucky7The only thing that remains a mystery to me is the Excel benchmark since that's the only one where HD4000 wouldn't skew the numbers. Or are there other accelerations in this CPU that Excel 2010 can use that aren't in Sandy Bridge?So yeah, it's a new architecture, but it doesn't seem to be a must-have upgrade from an i5-2500K.

    Last I checked the CPU rendering benchmark in Cinebench 11.5 is highly threaded and very CPU bound, it doesn't use the GPU. And many of the benchmarks in the top chart wouldn't see much of a benefit from a more aggressive turbo boost or a faster GPU, as they're also heavily threaded and CPU bound. Looks like the second chart is meant as the GPU comparison, not the first.

    And it's not a new architecture, it's Sandy Bridge with tweaks and optimizations on Intel's 22nm process.
  • 7 Hide
    Raidur , December 1, 2011 11:34 PM
    Finally, a CPU that will convince me to ditch my old (but still capable) OC Q9550.

    Put me on a 5.2ghz Ivy and I'll be set for a good while.
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