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ATI FirePro RG220 Shares GPU on Networks

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 29 comments

IT admins reduce the need for hardware by installing this card in a data center and allowing workers to use the GPU across the network.

Tuesday AMD said that its new ATI FirePro RG220 is an ideal solution for IT administrators looking to reduce local power consumption and cooling costs per workstation. This is accomplished by installing the graphics card in a datacenter, and allowing users to connect to the ATI GPU across the network thanks to the FirePro's built-in PCoIP (PC-over-IP) technology.

The card itself consumes a maximum of 35 watts thanks to a passive cooling design, and measures just half the length of a standard PCI card and uses only one slot. The enterprise-based graphics card also sports a meager 512 MB of on-board memory, support for DirectX 10.1, OpenGL 2.1, and Parallels Workstation Extreme.

“The ATI FirePro RG220 is an extremely compelling solution that combines AMD’s graphics innovation and Teradici’s PC-over-IP remoting protocol to deliver a rich, uncompromised user experience for today’s most demanding graphics applications,” said Dan Cordingley, president and CEO, Teradici Corporation. “This integrated GPU and PCoIP host card provides customers with a simple and efficient solution to help ensure data security and to provide a high performance remote experience.”

AMD also said that the ATI FirePro RG220 is part of a secure solution that stores user data behind the firewall and within the confines of the data center, "helping to ensure that customer or corporate information is protected." To see this card in action, check out AMD's YouTube video shown below.

ATI FirePro RG220

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Top Comments
  • 23 Hide
    Gin Fushicho , May 4, 2010 11:03 PM
    Okay now that's AWESOME.
  • 21 Hide
    dman3k , May 4, 2010 11:00 PM
    Why am I not surprised that AMD is leading the industry in graphics?
  • 14 Hide
    idisarmu , May 4, 2010 11:26 PM
    Trueno07Would you like some graphics card with your heat sink sir?


    *facepalm*

    It's passively cooled. What do you expect?
Other Comments
  • 21 Hide
    dman3k , May 4, 2010 11:00 PM
    Why am I not surprised that AMD is leading the industry in graphics?
  • 23 Hide
    Gin Fushicho , May 4, 2010 11:03 PM
    Okay now that's AWESOME.
  • 6 Hide
    Shadow703793 , May 4, 2010 11:06 PM
    Looks good, but how well does it work with GPU intensive work?
  • -6 Hide
    Trueno07 , May 4, 2010 11:11 PM
    Would you like some graphics card with your heat sink sir?
  • 8 Hide
    kelfen , May 4, 2010 11:12 PM
    neat concept!
  • 13 Hide
    Pyroflea , May 4, 2010 11:20 PM
    That's amazing. This could completely revolutionize how large-scale businesses operate.

    It'd be a cool service to offer to have "server farms" with these cards, and you pay for access to said farms.
  • 14 Hide
    idisarmu , May 4, 2010 11:26 PM
    Trueno07Would you like some graphics card with your heat sink sir?


    *facepalm*

    It's passively cooled. What do you expect?
  • 3 Hide
    nforce4max , May 4, 2010 11:28 PM
    Interesting fits into the cloud computing concept would be of great service to less powerful devices.
  • 2 Hide
    Mathos , May 4, 2010 11:43 PM
    Very cool concept. Would allow very easy evolution to cloud computing. It allows workstations only need an igp based solution for local video, while having the render cards in a massive server farm. This would also allow remote access very likely through VPN networking I'm guessing so you'd be able to do your rendering work from a home based pc if needed.
  • -6 Hide
    tpi2007 , May 5, 2010 12:18 AM
    Trueno07Would you like some graphics card with your heat sink sir?


    idisarmu*facepalm* It's passively cooled. What do you expect?


    facepalm to you sir, he obviously meant it as a joke, given that the heatsink covers practically all the PCB, the joke makes perfect sense.
  • 0 Hide
    ikefu , May 5, 2010 12:37 AM
    This would be great for places that have very low budget workstations at people's desk but have occasional need for high powered graphics on things like 3D AutoCAD etc. You could reserve on of those cards only for times when you need it and then release it to your co-workers.

    As someone who has need of this I approve =)
  • 1 Hide
    djtronika , May 5, 2010 1:14 AM
    thumbs up! we use pcoip already. evga has already had a solution just like this for quite some time now. we actually use just the host card portion of evga's pcoip technology and use samsung's 19" monitor (they also have a very cool 24") with pcoip built in for the portal side of things. very cool stuff. only thing is you need a 1gbps connection (just check my posts on evga's forum). anywho, it's good to see AMD coming to the party and id love to see how it stacks up to evga's card (128MB XDR Memory, 300Mhz GPU Clock Speed, 400Mhz Memory Clock Speed). good times if you are an IT admin. if anyone is wondering how powerful this stuff is well, you can play modern warfare 2 over a network cable. granted, at 1440x900 (instead of 1920x1200) and no aa or af. STILL, it was really cool gaming on my desktop in the other room. peace.
  • 0 Hide
    koga73 , May 5, 2010 1:47 AM
    amazing! how many work stations can it support?
  • 2 Hide
    liquid0h , May 5, 2010 1:51 AM
    Why does this remind me of the old dummy terminals?
  • -1 Hide
    djtronika , May 5, 2010 2:00 AM
    koga73amazing! how many work stations can it support?


    this solution is a 1to1. (even with dual monitor support)

    amd says in a future driver release you can out more cards in the server and host more workstation. screw that, mainly because teradici is working on a 1 to many solution (via software) but you need vmware view. still in beta form. works great for us (server rack at each location, network to front desk). basically, a mini data center at each of our stores. once they get the 1 to many working and they can deliver on the promise of software rendering of directx without a GPU, then we can truly have 1 main datacenter hosting all of our clients. good times. all in all, you'd still use the portal (evga portal or a samsung monitor with pcoip integrated) but you wouldnt even need these host cards.
  • 2 Hide
    rigaudio , May 5, 2010 2:43 AM
    liquid0hWhy does this remind me of the old dummy terminals?

    Because it is. But for the FUTURE.
  • 1 Hide
    Marco925 , May 5, 2010 3:09 AM
    Cloud Gaming Anyone?

    Or Some Cloud Crysis! Because It Plays Crysis!
  • 0 Hide
    daggs , May 5, 2010 5:15 AM
    dreamphantom_1977Now thats cool.

    correction, that's extremely cool.
  • 0 Hide
    MrHectorEric , May 5, 2010 5:47 AM
    This is a great solution for smaller businesses that can't afford to give each of their employees a high powered graphics chip for 3d modeling. This is a great first step and can definitely see it becoming more popular as drivers and multiple station support improves.
  • 0 Hide
    anamaniac , May 5, 2010 7:36 AM
    I like the idea of networked GPU's.
    Hook up a netbook to a 10Gigabit line on some router, and start using playing Crysis on that 10.1" baby from the 5770 in my main rig.

    But yeah... I see the potential for local based cloud computing with something like this.
    I build a massive rig with a 6 core Phenom, and throw in two 5970's, and then host a LAN with everyone on their little notebooks with Intel IGP's, using the graphical horsepower of my rig.
    Apartment building that has gigabit fibre optic net for all residents, and access to a large supply of networked GPU's too. That would be awesome.
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