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Rumor Roundup: Everything We've Heard on Desktop Haswell So Far, June 3, Box Art Included

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 32 comments

A brief roundup of all the information that has come to light, through rumors or otherwise, regarding the upcoming Intel Haswell desktop CPUs.

The Haswell launch is so close that Intel has decided to count the time to release in nanoseconds, which unsurprisingly comes up with a fairly huge number of zeros that spikes our interest even further. For those of you who haven't been keeping track of all the rumors regarding the Haswell CPUs, we're hereby giving you a big roundup with all the believable rumors that have surfaced so far.

The CPUs will all be backed on a 22 nm lithography and feature either a GT2 (HD 4600) or a GT3e (HD 5200) graphics part. The chips with the "*R" naming will carry the GT3e GPU, while all the others will carry the GT2 part. Not only this, but the "*R" named CPUs will likely have a BGA (Ball Grid Array) socket instead of the LGA (Land Grid Array) socket.

The CPU's with the "*K" naming are unlocked processors that will have an unlocked multiplier as well as an adjustable base clock frequency. Previously, only the multiplier was unlocked. The maximum multiplier value tied to a 100 MHz base clock will be 80x; the maximum would be lower for the other base clocks. For example, the maximum multiplier for a 125 MHz base clock would be 64x; the maximum for a 166 MHz base clock would be 48x. Either way, in all three cases the maximum CPU frequency would be no higher than 8.0 GHz. Not only this, but the base clock is no longer tied to the other controllers; it is only for the CPU itself. Previously, adjusting the base clock frequency by as little as 7 MHz could destabilize the system due to affecting other controllers. According to Intel, this should make the CPUs easier to overclock.

Model
Core / Threads
Base / Turbo
L3 Cache
GPU
Memory
TDP
MSRP
Core i7-47704 / 8
3.4 / 3.9 GHz8 MB
HD 4600
1,200 MHz
84 W
$292
Core i7-4770K4 / 83.5 / 3.9 GHz8 MBHD 46001,250 MHz
84 W$327
Core i7-4770S4 / 83.1 / 3.9 GHz8 MBHD 46001,200 MHz
65 W
$285
Core i5-46704 / 4
3.4 / 3.8 GHz6 MB
HD 46001,200 MHz
84 W$209
Core i5-4670K4 / 43.4 / 3.8 GHz6 MBHD 46001,200 MHz
84 W$227
Core i5-45704 / 43.2 / 3.6 GHz6 MBHD 46001,150 MHz
84 W$189
Core i5-4570S4 / 43.0 / 3.6 GHz6 MBHD 46001,150 MHz
65 W
$182
Core i5-44304 / 43.0 / 3.2 GHz6 MBHD 46001,100 MHz
84 W$175
Core i7-4770R4 / 83.2 / 3.9 GHz6 MBHD 52001,300 MHz65 W?
Core i7-4770S4 / 83.1 / 3.9 GHz8 MBHD 46001,200 MHz65 W?
Core i7-4765T4 / 82.0 / 3.0 GHz8 MBHD 4600
1,200 MHz
35 W?
Core i5-4670R4 / 43.0 / 3.7 GHz4 MBHD 52001,300 MHz65 W?
Core i5-4670T4 / 43.1 / 3.8 GHz6 MBHD 46001,200 MHz45 W?
Core i5-4570R4 / 42.7 / 3.2 GHz4 MBHD 52001,150 MHz65 W?
Core i5-4570S4 / 43.0 / 3.6 GHz6 MBHD 4600
1,150 MHz
65 W?
Core i5-4570T2 / 4
2.9 / 3.6 GHz4 MBHD 46001,150 MHz35 W?
Core i5-4430S4 / 42.7 / 3.2 GHz6 MBHD 4600
1,100 MHz
65 W?

The table shows all of the specifications for all of the desktop Haswell CPUs of which we are aware to date, as well as the MSRP's of eight of the processors.

Beyond these changes, a rumor regarding the CPU's thermals has also surfaced. Previously, most CPUs have the die soldered straight to the IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader). This way, the heat could easily be transferred to the surface of the CPU. However, with Ivy Bridge, Intel decided to not solder the CPU die to the IHS, but to instead fill the cavity with TIM (Thermal Interface Material). As a result, the heat transfer was much less efficient, and the CPUs would run notably warmer. A report has indicated that the Haswell CPUs do have better thermals than the Ivy Bridge counterparts; however, it remains uncertain whether the CPU dies have been soldered to the IHS or whether TIM has been used.

In the meantime, VR-Zone has leaked an image of the box art of the Haswell CPUs. It looks like a CPU box.

Extrapolating the countdown timer shows us that the CPUs will be released starting June 3, 2013, meaning that they will be released during Computex 2013.

Display 32 Comments.
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  • 17 Hide
    sundragon , April 29, 2013 5:27 PM
    All this hubub for 5-10% performance improvement... Oh, memories of days yonder when AMD cracked the whip and intel jumped...
    I say this and I'm still interested, lulz
Other Comments
  • 0 Hide
    Tom Williams , April 29, 2013 5:23 PM
    When will we know about the Z87 motherboards?
  • 17 Hide
    sundragon , April 29, 2013 5:27 PM
    All this hubub for 5-10% performance improvement... Oh, memories of days yonder when AMD cracked the whip and intel jumped...
    I say this and I'm still interested, lulz
  • 0 Hide
    Tom Williams , April 29, 2013 5:32 PM
    dup posting..sorry.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , April 29, 2013 5:48 PM
    This will be my next upgrade from my 2600k. But seriously who gives a rip about its integrated graphics. No one in their right mind cares about it either when buying these types of CPUs. When paired with a top of the line 2 dedicated GPUs (GTX 680s) in my case, you can't beat the performance. Best of the best. I'm hoping for a nice 20-30% boost over my current CPU. Or better.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , April 29, 2013 5:50 PM
    Quote:
    When will we know about the Z87 motherboards?

    Starting to leak out slowly. Prob will be next month before any hit retail at earliest.

  • 0 Hide
    vmem , April 29, 2013 5:59 PM
    Hmm, for all current sandybridge "k" users, it looks like we're only looking at a ~20% increase at stock clocks (btw, do notice these chips are clocked higher at stock!) Eitherway I currently have my chip overclocked so I guess performance will largely how overclockable haswell is. remember how Ivybridge's bad thermals basically meant ZERO performance increase from an overclocked sandy part? T_T
  • -4 Hide
    josejones , April 29, 2013 6:05 PM
    So, Intel finally decided to stop including those crappy CPU coolers and either switch it for an upgrade or just leave it out completely and reduce the price by $20?
  • -5 Hide
    DarkSable , April 29, 2013 6:42 PM
    I still don't understand how Intel thinks that having an increased core clock... that is only tied to the CPU... is going to make overclocking any 'easier.'
    Surely people who are actually going to overclock know better than to see that as anything but market hype, yes?
  • 8 Hide
    RazberyBandit , April 29, 2013 6:43 PM
    Quote:
    This will be my next upgrade from my 2600k. But seriously who gives a rip about its integrated graphics. No one in their right mind cares about it either when buying these types of CPUs. When paired with a top of the line 2 dedicated GPUs (GTX 680s) in my case, you can't beat the performance. Best of the best. I'm hoping for a nice 20-30% boost over my current CPU. Or better.


    Perhaps you (and most gamers) don't care about IGP, but plenty of productivity-driven professionals whose primary concern is compute performance, not graphics performance, may indeed care. If the IGP is good enough, such individuals would have no need to add a discrete card of any kind to their machines to get their work done.

    I don't feel Haswell's mild increase in performance truly warrants an upgrade for most Sandy Bridge owners, let alone Ivy Bridge owners.
  • 7 Hide
    edwd2 , April 29, 2013 6:47 PM
    At least, the processors are 5-7 dollars cheaper their respective ivy bridge counterparts on average, that aside, am i the only who thinks the box artwork is pretty bad?
  • 1 Hide
    DarkSable , April 29, 2013 6:51 PM
    Quote:
    At least, the processors are 5-7 dollars cheaper their respective ivy bridge counterparts on average, that aside, am i the only who thinks the box artwork is pretty bad?


    Nope. It's weird.
  • 0 Hide
    tomfreak , April 29, 2013 7:01 PM
    Quote:
    All this hubub for 5-10% performance improvement... Oh, memories of days yonder when AMD cracked the whip and intel jumped...
    I say this and I'm still interested, lulz
    I think it isnt that impressive to previous "K"CPU owner. but the unlock BLCK from Haswell + high multi will mean pretty much all other non-K CPU will be highly overclock-able.

    This is pretty deadly if it is apply on the super budget dual CPU like i3 + pentium class Especially for people who are looking to upgrade from core 2 duo system and are looking for high IPC CPU without breaking the bank.

    May be a 4GHz+ cheap $30-100 pentium / i3 can finally end the overpriced core 2 quads Q95xx/Q9650 which cost $100 on a used unit.

  • 1 Hide
    DarkSable , April 29, 2013 7:04 PM
    Quote:
    I think it isnt that impressive to previous "K"CPU owner. but the unlock BLCK from Haswell + high multi will mean pretty much all other non-K CPU will be highly overclock-able.

    This is pretty deadly if it is apply on the super budget dual CPU like i3 + pentium class Especially for people who are looking to upgrade from core 2 duo system and are looking for high IPC CPU without breaking the bank.

    May be a 4GHz+ cheap $30-100 pentium / i3 can finally end the overpriced core 2 quads Q95xx/Q9650 which cost $100 on a used unit.


    This is Intel we're talking about. I would be very, very surprised if they went back to selling processors that could overclock without paying the premium for a 'k' series chip... especially since they are still selling 'k' series.

    There's no way they're selling a 'k' series chip while still letting the others overclock.

  • 0 Hide
    ujaansona , April 29, 2013 7:07 PM
    That box art looks hideous.
  • 3 Hide
    kewlmunky , April 29, 2013 7:08 PM
    Wish they would release variants without the integrated graphics for cheaper.
  • 2 Hide
    DarkSable , April 29, 2013 7:12 PM
    Quote:
    Wish they would release variants without the integrated graphics for cheaper.


    I pretty much guarantee you they'll release an equivalent of the 3350p, but not on release day.
  • 0 Hide
    teh_chem , April 29, 2013 7:21 PM
    Quote:
    I still don't understand how Intel thinks that having an increased core clock... that is only tied to the CPU... is going to make overclocking any 'easier.'
    Surely people who are actually going to overclock know better than to see that as anything but market hype, yes?

    I kinda agree with you. Historically, having an adjustable CPU frequency meant that you could overclock without the need of a special multiplier-unlocked CPU--with any old CPU. But since they're still only allowing adjustment with an unlocked CPU, I'm not getting much of the significance.
  • 0 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , April 29, 2013 10:31 PM
    But can it run Crysis by itself or does it still need a dedicated video card?
  • 1 Hide
    marshal11 , April 30, 2013 3:24 AM
    @DarkSable I personally think that separating the BSCLK from the rest of the system is a good thing. When I tune the BSCLK I don't want my RAM to be screwed with. If I wanted my RAM to run at higher frequencies I'd like to OC it separately, and vice versa.
  • 0 Hide
    DarkSable , April 30, 2013 3:29 AM
    Quote:
    @DarkSable I personally think that separating the BSCLK from the rest of the system is a good thing. When I tune the BSCLK I don't want my RAM to be screwed with. If I wanted my RAM to run at higher frequencies I'd like to OC it separately, and vice versa.


    That's all fine and dandy, but this doesn't matter at all. It's completely separated from anything but the core, so it's not actually gaining you anything.... which means there will be zero difference between overclocking with the multiplier and overclocking with the core clock.
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