Intel Demonstrates Haswell Processors at IDF

Haswell, which will follow Ivy Bridge as 22 nm processors with a new, fourth-generation micro-architecture, is almost entirely focused on power consumption and new computer form factors this will enable.

Intel said that Haswell will improve platform idle-power over the second-generation Core processor, Sandy Bridge, by more than 20x. The company also promised a portfolio of even lower-power processors based on Haswell for 2013. Low-power Haswell CPUs will initially target a power envelope of 10 watts.

In a product demonstration, executive vice president David Perlmutter showed that Haswell processors will deliver about two times the performance of Ivy Bridge processors at the same power, while consuming less than half the power of Ivy Bridge processors at the same performance level. Needless to say, Haswell will be Intel's power play for Ultrabooks and thin form factor PCs.

"The 4th generation Intel Core processor family and our new line of low-power processors will usher in an era of unprecedented innovation in mobile computing," Perlmutter said. "Our focus to deliver even lower power with the great performance that our processors are known for is as fundamentally significant as when we shifted our development focus beyond sheer processor speed in 2001. As a result, you'll see our customers delivering sleek and cool convertible designs, as well as radical breakthrough experiences across a growing spectrum of mobile devices."

In its original laid out and self-imposed tick-tock cadence from 2005, Haswell would be due for introduction late this year. This may be rather unlikely however and we should rather expect the processors to arrive in H1 2013, as a previously leaked slide indicates.


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  • Menigmand
    Great that CPU's will use less power, but what about performance gains? The wild rollercoaster rush of performance I saw in my childhood has gone. I feel sad and downcast.
    19
  • Anonymous
    "Haswell processors will deliver about two times the performance of Ivy Bridge processors at the same power, while consuming less than half the power of Ivy Bridge processors"

    So about the same overall performance can be expected...
    16
  • CaedenV
    wowzzzspeed : 2x , tdp : 1/2 x

    for graphics it is a 2x increase for the same TDP, so the same performance at 1/2TDP of Ivy Bridge, which is highly impressive. But for the CPU performance we are not expecting a huge increase in performance, my shot in the dark guess would be somewhere in the 5-10% range, with some aspects not changing at all, while other aspects get much larger increases.

    But think about it. PC sales are down, because for the bulk of users out there we have enough CPU power for that platform. Most people I know are more than happy with the performance of their C2Duo CPUs which are 5+ years old now (provided that they are paired with SSD and dedicated GPU solution). The demand in the market are for better battery life and performance in portable devices, smaller form factors for dedicated use machines (smart tables to vending machines), and lower TDP for fan-less operation in traditional devices.

    Now I want the next gen of super computing just as much as anyone, but as a company they are facing a serious threat from ARM, which Haswell and Broadwell will probably remove if things go as well as Intel is hoping. Once the race to the bottom hits a major barier then we will see a new move on the ultra uncompromised performance end of things again. Development has always gone this way; Efficient single core development, to mass parallelism, then getting that more efficient, and then even more parallelism. Right now we are on an efficiency run for the next 2-3 chips (with modest performance increases as well), but in 2-3 years we will see a performance push again.
    11
  • Other Comments
  • Menigmand
    Great that CPU's will use less power, but what about performance gains? The wild rollercoaster rush of performance I saw in my childhood has gone. I feel sad and downcast.
    19
  • Anonymous
    "Haswell processors will deliver about two times the performance of Ivy Bridge processors at the same power, while consuming less than half the power of Ivy Bridge processors"

    So about the same overall performance can be expected...
    16
  • Anonymous
    There's only one answer:
    fagathlon.
    -10