Microsoft Limits Support For Upcoming Processors To Windows 10

Microsoft announced that starting with Windows 10, it will provide software support for the latest processors only on the latest Windows platform. This will further push users to upgrade their OS in order to use the newest generation of processor technologies.

Throughout the last years, when a new processor is released, Microsoft has released software support for it in every supported version of Windows on the market. These updates at times are extremely important to maintaining the smooth operations of the system with new hardware, such as the update that was released alongside the Pentium 4 Prescott processors to view Hyper-Threaded cores differently than full fledged CPU cores. A more recent example is the update for AMD’s Bulldozer CPUs that marked half of the cores in a similar way as Hyper-Threaded cores, so that Windows more evenly distribute tasks among the available MCMs.

Going forward, as new silicon generations are introduced, they will require the latest Windows platform at that time for support. This enables us to focus on deep integration between Windows and the silicon, while maintaining maximum reliability and compatibility with previous generations of platform and silicon. For example, Windows 10 will be the only supported Windows platform on Intel’s upcoming ‘Kaby Lake’ silicon, Qualcomm’s upcoming ‘8996’ silicon, and AMD’s upcoming ‘Bristol Ridge’ silicon,” said Terry Myerson, Executive Vice President at Microsoft, in a blog post.

SImilarly, Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and Windows 10 all received updates related to Intel’s new Skylake processors, but when Skylake’s successor, Kaby Lake, and AMD’s Bristol Ridge processors are released, Microsoft will update only Windows 10 to support them. If you are still using an older Windows OS, you might be able to use these processors, too, but you may encounter instability, increased power draw, and lower performance relative to Windows 10.

Even with updates to extend Skylake Support to Windows 7, Microsoft claimed that negative side effects of using an older OS over Windows 10 are already quite tangible.

According to Myerson, “Compared to Windows 7 PC’s, Skylake when combined with Windows 10, enables up to 30x better graphics and 3x the battery life – with the unmatched security of Credential Guard utilizing silicon supported virtualization.“

This also extends to SoCs from companies such as Qualcomm and Samsung that are placed into Windows-based devices. Microsoft said that users on older OSes that currently have Skylake support should plan to move to Windows 10 in the near future as well, as Microsoft will stop supplying updates related to Skylake to these operating systems on July 17, 2017.

It is interesting to see that Microsoft opted to make this change of policy starting with Windows 10. Although there may be some tangible benefits to upgrading to Windows 10, Microsoft appears to want everyone to move to Windows 10 so badly that it is giving the OS away. We previously commented on the amount of data Windows 10 gathers from its users for the purpose of advertising, and it seems that this move by Microsoft is just another way of pushing users on to Windows 10.

If you want to get the full performance out of your Skylake, Kaby Lake, or AMD Zen system, it looks like you will need to make the move to Windows 10.

Follow Michael Justin Allen Sexton @EmperorSunLao. Follow us on Facebook, Google+, RSS, Twitter and YouTube.

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  • mattblum
    MS is just pushing more people to Linux. I upgraded to Win 10 on both my home desktop and my work laptop. I am thoroughly unimpressed. Does it work? Yes it does. Is it more stable then Win 7, which was my previous platform? No it is not. Do I like feeling that I am paying to be forced into a walled garden? No I do not. I will build a new gaming box this year if all goes well. Will have Win 10 with ever possible call home setting turned off. For serious work, I rely on Linux these days. Not dealing with MS strong arm tactics when I don't have to. When the games I play work as well on Linux as they do on Windows, I'll be outta there.
    29
  • JackNaylorPE
    MS great idea was to adopt the Google financial model whereby you give everything away for free and make your money by selling user information. And it might have worked. The problem is that it is the increasingly strong arm tactics that is the source of users aversion to Windows 10. They could solve their problem by removing most users objections:

    1. Ya wanna use my computer to d/l updates to other users, fine. Let me control the access. Some users might not object to this usage at any level, some might not care at all and yet others might allow it at times when they system is idle. Options might be:

    a) No, I do not want my PC used as a download server.
    b) Yes, I'm fine with my PC used as a download server.
    c) Yes, I'm fine with my PC used as a download server but only between the hours of ___ and ___

    2. For Windows Update, allow me to control if and when upgrades are installed. Options would be:

    For Security Fixes
    a) Let Windows Update install whatever it wants.
    b) Advise me when Windows Updates are available and if I do not actively deselect (hide) one or more updates within ___ days, download and install them.
    c) Advise me when Windows Updates are available and let me install them or not install them whenever I damn well please.

    For or OS Upgrades / Additional "Features", change last option to:
    c) Advise me when Upgrades / Additional Features are available and let me choose whether or not to install them.

    For Hardware Drivers, change last option to
    c) Advise me when new Hardware drivers are available and include a link to the manufacturers web site.

    3. Put all the privacy related / tracking items on a single window and leave all off by default. Provide additional Windows features whereby users are able to opt in to these feature by turning on these items. For example, those who opt in to one set of tracking / telemetry might get say half a dozen Windows Games, like Solitaire. Add in another set of tracking / features and get something else. Opt in to all and you get in the Windows Club and get a discount on MS sponsored PC / XBox games.
    26
  • SteelCity1981
    all they want to do is stop supporting their older oses, that's what is it's all about.
    24
  • Other Comments
  • mattblum
    MS is just pushing more people to Linux. I upgraded to Win 10 on both my home desktop and my work laptop. I am thoroughly unimpressed. Does it work? Yes it does. Is it more stable then Win 7, which was my previous platform? No it is not. Do I like feeling that I am paying to be forced into a walled garden? No I do not. I will build a new gaming box this year if all goes well. Will have Win 10 with ever possible call home setting turned off. For serious work, I rely on Linux these days. Not dealing with MS strong arm tactics when I don't have to. When the games I play work as well on Linux as they do on Windows, I'll be outta there.
    29
  • Radijacija
    Joao is a pleb
    -15
  • erendofe
    sounds like fear mongering. unless there are radical architectural features and/or layout changes, this isn't a real big deal. windows has a generic cpu and bus driver anyway
    6