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BCN Report: AMD at 68.6% of Direct CPU Sales in Japan, Gaining in Pre-builts

(Image credit: AMD)

According to a recent report, AMD's processor sales are accelerating in Japan, reaching 68.6% of direct sales.

Though it's been known for some time now that AMD is making strides in some regions such as Germany, data from other regions has been slow to accumulate. Recently, data for both direct CPU sales (like ordering a CPU from Amazon) and pre-builts became available via BCN, a Japanese company that tracks market share trends in Japan.

The results are pretty telling: In Japan, AMD has 68.6% of direct CPU sales this July and 14.7% in pre-builts in June. The Ryzen 3000 processors seem to have further accelerated AMD's pace because its direct CPU sales made up only 46.7% last June.

(Image credit: PC Watch)

This isn't incredibly surprising news: AMD is launching a full-scale assault against every one of Intel's desktop processor families, with the most intense competition currently coming on the desktop (for now).

AMD's sales aren't as pronounced when it comes to pre-built PCs, but considering they made up just 2% last January and are now up to 14.7%, the gains are impressive. It'll be interesting to see what the landscape will look like for pre-builts once the July data is available; if Ryzen 3000 has the same impact on pre-builts as it did to direct CPU sales, AMD might gain on Intel very quickly.

It's possible there could be a global trend towards AMD overtaking Intel in direct CPU sales, but big market shifts take time. It shouldn't be surprising that AMD is once again making inroads in these segments, but the speed at which it's happening in Japan is surprising given the sometimes slow rate of change in market share statistics. It's hard to say how Intel will respond, but we do know the -9900KS arrives later this year, but it is largely a -9900K with higher all-core turbo clocks, and it doesn't seem 10nm processors will come to the desktop soon.

  • ingtar33
    Japan is a little different, thanks to the anti-trust win by AMD over Intel in Japan, AMD has traditionally held a lot larger market share in japan then in other countries. That advantage went away somewhat as the terms of the anti-trust ruling were met (and AMD remained uncompetitive in the CPU market), but AMD has held a fairly strong market position in japan it just doesn't have anywhere else.

    I'm starting to see some AMD laptop/desktops breaking into the market on the prebuilt, however it seems Dell (unlike HP) is hellbent to avoid offering AMD options, which is bad news for AMD as the vast majority of the business desktop and server markets are dominated by Dell. (Dell does offer some AMD options but they're only in the low end cheep offering, nothing on their high end quality systems)
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    I'm hoping this means we'll start seeing AMD products show up in premium laptops. Intel retains a stranglehold on the premium laptop segment despite their worse value and overheating issues. The AMD laptops I've been evaluating at work all seem to be junk with substandard parts. AMD also needs to cram some more cores into their mobile parts.

    Give me a 6c/12t AMD cpu, graphics that can be used for gaming and 3d sculpting, and a Wacom AES panel and I'll upgrade from my Intel 2-in-1. I haven't found a reason to move away from a Yoga 720 yet -- a 2-in-1 that actually has cooling, graphics, 4c/8t, and Wacom!
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    ingtar33 said:
    Japan is a little different, thanks to the anti-trust win by AMD over Intel in Japan, AMD has traditionally held a lot larger market share in japan then in other countries. That advantage went away somewhat as the terms of the anti-trust ruling were met (and AMD remained uncompetitive in the CPU market), but AMD has held a fairly strong market position in japan it just doesn't have anywhere else.

    I'm starting to see some AMD laptop/desktops breaking into the market on the prebuilt, however it seems Dell (unlike HP) is hellbent to avoid offering AMD options, which is bad news for AMD as the vast majority of the business desktop and server markets are dominated by Dell. (Dell does offer some AMD options but they're only in the low end cheep offering, nothing on their high end quality systems)

    https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/scc/sc/laptops?~ck=mn&appliedRefinements=10352
    https://www.dell.com/en-us/work/shop/scc/sc/laptops?~ck=mn&appliedRefinements=10352
    Hell bent you say? Because I see quite a few consumer and business laptops available with Ryzen mobile CPUs.

    bigdragon said:
    I'm hoping this means we'll start seeing AMD products show up in premium laptops. Intel retains a stranglehold on the premium laptop segment despite their worse value and overheating issues. The AMD laptops I've been evaluating at work all seem to be junk with substandard parts. AMD also needs to cram some more cores into their mobile parts.

    Give me a 6c/12t AMD cpu, graphics that can be used for gaming and 3d sculpting, and a Wacom AES panel and I'll upgrade from my Intel 2-in-1. I haven't found a reason to move away from a Yoga 720 yet -- a 2-in-1 that actually has cooling, graphics, 4c/8t, and Wacom!

    I think AMD needs to offer more options. Right now their best option is the 3750U which is a 4/8 part while the Intel i5 9400H is its equivalent. Intels i7 line is 6/12 in mobile and AMD does not have anything with that to compete right now. Intels i9 and Xeon have no direct competition at all so they dominate the top end and workstation markets.

    Sure you could say the Radeon GPU but the majority of people buying a laptop are not gaming so even the lowest Intel iGPU works. Those who are gaming tend to buy with a discrete GPU so thats a null point.
    Reply
  • stevsaunders
    Still for for a serious gaming CPU users tend to be choosing Intel: https://essaytyper.pro/.
    Reply