European Pricing Emerges for Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3090 Ti

Asus ROG Strix GeForce RTX 3090
(Image credit: Asus)

Despite not being released just yet, more listings for Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3090 Ti have surfaced, this time in Europe. As Tweeted by @momomo_us, (opens in new tab) an Estonian retailer, has listed three Asus ROG and TUF RTX 3090 Tis with very high prices, upwards of 4,332 Euros or more.

The Asus TUF RTX 3090 Ti is the cheapest and surfaces for 4,332.11 Euros ($3,967.92 converted without tax) from the Estonian retailer. In the middle is the factory overclocked variant at 4,413.85 Euros ($4,042.8 converted without tax), and the flagship ROG Strix RTX 3090 Ti -- which also happens to be the liquid-cooled variant, is going for 4,577.40 Euros ($4,192.6 converted without tax).

We don't have an official MSRP from Nvidia yet, but for reference, scalped RTX 3090s on eBay are going for around $2,609 right now. So if we assume these are scalped Estonian RTX 3090 Ti's, they will sell for nearly twice the scalped 3090s. So we could be looking at a 1.5x to 2x higher MSRP of the 3090 Ti once Nvidia gets around to announcing it. But this is an educated guess on our part; these prices increase due to several other reasons.

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Ironically Asus' listing is relatively tame compared to other listings we've seen already. For example, a few days ago, we covered another listing regarding a Japanese retailer selling the RTX 3090 Ti for a whopping $5500 (with tax).

Rumored specs indicate Nvidia's RTX 3090 Ti will be packing a fully enabled GA102 core and upgraded GDDR6X modules. For a total of 10752 CUDA cores and 21Gbps GDDR6X memory, giving the 3090 Ti over 1TBps of memory bandwidth. These modules will also have double the capacity of the current modules used on the RTX 3090, bringing the total count from 24 to just 12. It will be very beneficial, as it makes cooling the GDDR6X modules far less complicated and allows for a more straightforward PCB design.

Nvidia originally shared some specifications of the RTX 3090 Ti at CES but kept many details in the dark such as the card MSRP. The company promised to share more details about the GPU before January was over but failed to do so for unknown reasons. Supposedly, Nvidia had to ask its AIB partners to halt the RTX 3090 Ti production due to quality control issues, which is why Nvidia delayed sharing more details last month, including the launch date of the 3090 Ti.

So, for now, we're still waiting on an official launch for the GeForce RTX 3090 Ti. However, with the number of listings for the card growing by the week, it seems its launch is imminent.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • VforV
    No one cares... not even nvidia since they forgot to launch it, pffft. :ROFLMAO:
    Reply
  • sepuko
    VforV said:
    No one cares... not even nvidia since they forgot to launch it, pffft. :ROFLMAO:
    Why would anybody care at those prices, this is like buying those gold plated Nokias with diamonds back in the day.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Easy, there are a lot of people with more money (or credit) than sense, and they need things like this to compensate for something,
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    Easy, there are a lot of people with more money (or credit) than sense, and they need things like this to compensate for something,
    I agree to some extent, but this particular one is exorbitant and I can't see it selling out at that price. The current market has determined a 3090 is worth about $2600. With the current stat of mining profitability, it should be lower, but it takes time for the market to catch up. $1400+ more for a Ti? That's almost the original MSRP of the 3090. The 3090Ti will be released too late for this price. Miners aren't going to touch this card. $4000 pre tax for a card that may make $5 a day? That's well over 2 years just to break even. There is a market of people willing to spend $1500 up to maybe $2000 on a gaming card with no mining in the picture. More than twice that? There's no market for that.
    Reply
  • Exploding PSU
    So this bundle of plastic, metal, and some semiconductors costs almost as much as my entire college tuition, and could pay my masters nearly three times over. What an insane market we live in
    Reply
  • jacob249358
    Wow. 2 years ago you could build a god-tier PC for cheaper than this thing.
    Reply
  • zipspyder
    LOL my first car cost less than one of those...
    Reply
  • wastanley734
    Admin said:
    More listings for Nvidia's RTX 3090 Ti have appeared, this time in Europe, with prices that will blow your socks off.

    European Pricing Emerges for Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3090 Ti : Read more

    You've done your math wrong euros are worth morth than the American dollar. 0.87euro=1.00usd so that like $5000!
    Reply
  • domih
    As long as they find idiots to buy them they will continue that kind of pricing.
    Reply
  • Gillerer
    wastanley734 said:
    You've done your math wrong euros are worth morth than the American dollar. 0.87euro=1.00usd so that like $5000!

    It seems you ignored "converted without tax" note. There is certainly something off with their calculation, but the price is still nowhere close to US$5,000.

    In the EU, all consumer prices must by law include taxes (rationale being that no hidden costs are allowed in marketing; this is the actual cost to the buyer).

    It seems Tom's Hardware did their calculation erroneously* with a 25% VAT rate which is in effect in Croatia, Denmark and Sweden:

    €4,332.11 incl. 25% VAT€4,332.11 / 1.25 = €3,465.69 tax-freeA 0.873427 EUR/USD conversion would yield US$3,967.92
    For Estonia (with a 20% VAT standard rate) it should instead be:

    €4,332.11 incl. 20% VAT€4,332.11 / 1.20 = €3,610.09 without VATDivide by the same 0.873427 EUR/USD exchange rate => US$4,133.25
    (* Unless the e-tail store detected the reader was in Croatia, Denmark or Sweden, and applied the appropriate VAT to display the up-to-date and accurate price to that country. This is the VAT rate that would then be required to be applied upon a sale. If this is the case, Tom's Hardware's original number is correct.)

    The exact exchange rate you get will affect the end result a few dollars, so reporting the converted values down to a cent is meaningless. It should be given as "about $4,133".
    Reply