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Buy A GTX 10-Series Card From EVGA, Get A Powerlink For Free (Updated)

Update, 10/3/2016, 2:18 p.m. PDT: Added more information about the promotion, specifically that you will need to pay for shipping and handling.

EVGA wants you to buy its Nvidia-based GPUs, specifically the new GTX 10 series. To that end, EVGA is adding an extra incentive to buy the cards. With every purchase of a GTX 10 series card, you also get the EVGA Powerlink device free.

The Powerlink is an L-shaped device that acts as an extension for your PCI-E power cable. You connect the cable to the side of the device so that the wiring is out of sight, which gives a clean look to the window-facing part of the card. It also supports multiple PCI-E pin configurations, and you can adjust the spacing of the Powerlink’s connectors so that it aligns with your GPUs PCI-E ports. In addition to the cosmetic upgrade, the Powerlink also includes solid-state capacitors for power filtering. EVGA also mentioned that the device wouldn’t affect your overclock speeds.

In order to qualify for the promotion, you’ll need to sign up for an EVGA account on the company’s website and register your EVGA GTX 1080, 1070 or 1060 GPU to your profile. Once you confirm the shipping address, the company will send the Powerlink within 1-3 business days. However, you will need to pay for the shipping and handling fee, which is determined by EVGA. Each customer is limited to four devices per account, and only one Powerlink per GTX 10-series card. EVGA will start shipping Powerlinks on November 1, but it didn’t provide a stop date for the new promotion.

  • Platinum Era
    Probably should mention that the user has to pay for shipping
    Reply
  • thundervore
    "Each customer is limited to four devices per account, and only one Powerlink per GTX 10-series card"

    I do not understand this. So customers can register 4 cards but is limited to only 1 free powerlink?

    Ok guys I get it. I misread the article and now understand that its one power link per device and not 1 power link per customer. You can stop down voting now :sarcastic:
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    18680896 said:
    "Each customer is limited to four devices per account, and only one Powerlink per GTX 10-series card"

    I do not understand this. So customers can register 4 cards but is limited to only 1 free powerlink?

    Whats hard to understand? You can have up to four cards, and each card is entitled to one Powerlink. 4x1
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    18680828 said:
    Probably should mention that the user has to pay for shipping

    Yes because paying $5 for shipping on an item that costs $25(USD) would upset some gift horse mouth looker self-entitled brats. :sarcastic:

    Reply
  • 10tacle
    EVGA's website is crashed!
    Reply
  • TadashiTG
    1 Powerlink per card, so if you buy 2 cards you can only get 2 Powerlinks.
    Reply
  • thundervore
    18680964 said:
    18680896 said:
    "Each customer is limited to four devices per account, and only one Powerlink per GTX 10-series card"

    I do not understand this. So customers can register 4 cards but is limited to only 1 free powerlink?

    Whats hard to understand? You can have up to four cards, and each card is entitled to one Powerlink. 4x1

    I had to reread it to understand it.

    I thought it meant you can register 4 cards but only receive 1 power link total. But now I reread it I understand for every 10 series card a customer registers they will receive 1 free power link and the limit is 4. So 4 cards = 4 power links. I got confused in the wording.
    Reply
  • tomshardwarenoob
    or they could, you know- put the pcie power input on the end of the card to start with
    Reply
  • anbello262
    To permanently place the pcie power input on the cards would be a very bad idea. It would automatically make the card quite longer, and may not fit in some cases.
    Since this is an accessory and not a feature, is completely optional. As a permanent feature, it's an entirely different issue.
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    I disagree with their statement that it will not affect overclocking. As long as the lower ripple is significant enough over the larger voltage drops caused by more intermediate plugs between the PSU and the GPU from added length and resistance, the lower ripple could indeed help overclocking slightly. At least that's how I think of it. But I think what they meant is it wouldn't negatively affect overclocking.

    I'm also questioning what 10 series card requires two 8-pin cables as shown in the picture. A GTX 1080 overclocked I can't see going past 225W with its 2100Mhz limit.
    Reply