Skip to main content

Logitech G Announces Esports-Targeted Pro Gaming Headset

Image 1 of 5

Image 2 of 5

Image 3 of 5

Image 4 of 5

Image 5 of 5

Logitech announced a new gaming headset targeted for esports. The Logitech G Pro is built with a laser focus on comfort, convenience, and communication quality.

Logitech G, the gaming arm of Logitech, has taken an interesting but confusing approach to product naming. Whereas most of its products adopt a G### (ie G413, G230, G810) naming convention, the company’s most pro-gaming-focused products are all simply named “Pro.” The idea leaves room for only one “Pro” product in each of Logitech’s product categories. For example, there’s already the Logitech G Pro mouse and the Logitech G Pro keyboard. Logitech is also big on gaming headsets, so it’s only Logi-cal (pun intended) that a Logitech G Pro headset exist.

The new Logitech G Pro headset follows the same philosophy of its Pro siblings. It’s a no-frills but high-quality device that’s built to perform reliably under heavy usage in competition. What that scenario translates to for a headset is a need for replaceable parts, extremely comfortable fit, high sound isolation, and a faultless microphone. There’s no outboard digital processing, RGB, or multi-channel input on the Pro.

Let’s address some of those talking points. The Pro uses stainless steel in its headband and yokes for durability. The ear cups are joined to the frame via mounts with two axes of movement that offer better fit and reduce stress on the frame, avoiding headband creaks. The microphone--a noise-cancelling unit with a wind- and pop-cutting foam cover--is mounted on a bending arm and connects to the headset simply via a 3.5mm monopole jack. The earpads are removable, and both a smooth and swede synthetic-leather sets are included. Finally, the cable and in-line mic and volume controls are also detachable.

We’ve already reviewed the Logitech G Pro headset and found it suitably fit for its intended purpose, if not a bit overpriced. It’ll be available starting April with a MSRP of $90.

Logitech G ProView Deal
  • 2Be_or_Not2Be
    If this is a "Pro" headset, why not have a secondary input for multi-channel support? You can have a dedicated 3.5mm jack for stereo output, and then a second input that connects through USB for multi-channel. So if the game support multi-channel or directional sound inputs, then you're covered.

    I can understand not going through a USB-only connector so that you don't have any external processing to possibly delay sound input, but a separate dedicated input could avoid that issue while keeping all options available.
    Reply
  • merlinq
    20835523 said:
    If this is a "Pro" headset, why not have a secondary input for multi-channel support? You can have a dedicated 3.5mm jack for stereo output, and then a second input that connects through USB for multi-channel. So if the game support multi-channel or directional sound inputs, then you're covered.

    Because it is unnecessary, this headset only has 2 speakers, as is proper.
    You can plug it into any usb DAC available already for surround emulation, or better stereo driving, if you wish.
    If you are not "pro" and don't wish to have a separate, high quality, DAC, you can use windows' (or dolby's, for a small fee) surround virtualization built into windows 10, it is decent enough to compete with the sort of cheap USB dongles that come with many cheaper headsets, and definitely better than any multi-driver-per-cup surround headset.
    Reply