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EVGA SuperNOVA 650 G3 PSU Review: Excellence Evolved

Efficiency, Temperature & Noise

Efficiency

Our efficiency testing procedure is detailed here.

Using results from the previous page, we plotted a chart showing the 650 G3’s efficiency at low loads, and loads from 10 to 110 percent of its maximum-rated capacity.

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Under normal loads, EVGA's 650 G3 is on par with Corsair's RM650x. Under light loads, it lands in second place behind the Seasonic SSR-650PD, which is 80 PLUS Platinum-certified.

Efficiency At Low Loads

In the following tests, we measure the PSU's efficiency at loads significantly lower than 10 percent of its maximum capacity (the lowest load the 80 PLUS standard measures). The loads we dialed were 20, 40, 60, and 80W. This is important for representing when a PC is idle, with power-saving features turned on.

Test #12V5V3.3V5VSBDC/AC (Watts)EfficiencyFan SpeedPSU NoisePF/AC Volts
11.194A0.492A0.484A0.196A19.66276.319%0 RPM<6.0 dB(A)0.729
12.229V5.013V3.308V5.068V25.763115.10V
22.412A0.990A0.994A0.396A39.74583.797%0 RPM<6.0 dB(A)0.872
12.225V5.015V3.309V5.061V47.430157.55V
33.632A1.487A1.508A5.056A59.86485.388%1462 RPM37.8 dB(A)0.945
12.233V5.016V3.310V5.056V70.108115.10V
44.841A1.995A1.990A0.791A79.81886.888%1355 RPM33.5 dB(A)0.941
12.234V5.017V3.311V5.050V91.863115.10V

This PSU's efficiency is high under light loads. But once the fan starts spinning fast to exhaust heat, its noise output ramps up as well.

5VSB Efficiency

The ATX specification, along with CEC, ErP Lot 3 2014 and ErP Lot 6 2010/2013, states that 5VSB standby supply efficiency should be as high as possible, recommending 75 percent or higher with 550mA, 1A, and 1.5A of load. The PSU should also achieve higher than 75% efficiency at 5VSB under full load, or with 3A if its max current output on this rail is higher than 3A.

We take six measurements: one each at 100, 250, 550, 1000, and 1500mA, and one with the full load the 5VSB rail can handle.   

Test #5VSBDC/AC (Watts)EfficiencyPF/AC Volts
10.102A0.51573.153%0.051
5.070V0.704115.05V
20.252A1.27776.789%0.114
5.066V1.663115.05V
30.543A2.74477.955%0.212
5.058V3.520115.05V
41.002A5.05878.467%0.311
5.046V6.446115.05V
51.502A7.56078.156%0.374
5.034V9.673115.06V
63.002A14.95776.040%0.457
4.983V19.670115.05V
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The 5VSB rail isn't particularly efficient. Super Flower has to improve its performance if the company wants to meet all ErP Lot 3 2014, ErP Lot 6 2013 and CEC regulations, which are very strict. 

Power Consumption In Idle And Standby

In the table below, you'll find the power consumption and voltage values of all rails (except -12V) when the PSU is idle (powered on, but without any load on its rails), and the power consumption when the PSU is in standby mode (without any load, at 5VSB).

Mode12V5V3.3V5VSBWattsPF/AC Volts
Idle12.230V5.012V3.308V5.074V4.6080.267
115.1V
Standby0.070.005
115.1V
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Vampire power is low enough at 115V, though it could be lower with 230V input. This would definitely help improve the 5VSB rail's efficiency.

Fan RPM, Delta Temperature, And Output Noise

Our mixed noise testing is described in detail here.

The first chart below illustrates the cooling fan's speed (in RPM), and the delta between input and output temperature. The results were obtained at 37°C (98.6°F) to 46°C (114.8°F) ambient temperature.   

The next chart shows the cooling fan's speed (again, in RPM) and output noise. We measured acoustics from one meter away, inside a hemi-anechoic chamber. Background noise inside the chamber was below 6 dB(A) during testing (it's actually much lower, but our sound meter’s microphone hits its floor), and the results were obtained with the PSU operating at 37°C (98.6°F) to 46°C (114.8°F) ambient temperature. 

The following graph illustrates the fan's output noise over the PSU's operating range. The same conditions of the above graph apply to our measurements, though the ambient temperature was between 30°C (86°F) to 32°C (89.6°F).  

The semi-passive mode doesn't last long. Afterwards, the PSU's fan lands in a range between 25-30 dB(A). Super Flower could use a more granular ramp-up starting with lower RPM. This would help being noise output down at lighter loads.


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  • bit_user
    I'm sure it's been said before, but it's worth repeating: SuperNova is a terrible name for a PSU!

    A supernova ... is a transient astronomical event that occurs during the last stellar evolutionary stages of a massive star's life, whose destruction is marked by one final titanic explosion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    Indeed it is but thankfully those ones have nothing to do with explosions :)
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    "If you want to install a pair of high-end cards, the SuperNOVA 650 G3 is simply not an option."

    Wouldn't 650 watts be too little for a system with two high end cards anyway?

    Nvidia recommends 600W for a system with a 1080 Ti in it.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    You will only have problems if you try to feed 2x VEGA cards with a 650W PSU. The Nvidia high-end cards have low consumption.

    this article contains power consumption for all high-end Nvidia GPUs. Another one including AMD ones will be released soon.

    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-gpus-for-mining-ethereum,5507.html
    Reply
  • gosubuilder
    I've had this PSU in my build sine around June 2017. Its been solid, haven't had any issues. Its noise isn't as bad as described in this article. I don't think I've stopped once thinking, "damn this PSU is loud" once.
    Reply
  • jpe1701
    They stopped putting 2 eps connectors in the 650 g2 as well. Mine came with only one and it was bought just a few months ago. Coincidentally would it be safe to use a splitter on that eps cable or was the original wired with connectors on different wires inside the sleeving?
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    20898091 said:
    I'm sure it's been said before, but it's worth repeating: SuperNova is a terrible name for a PSU!

    LOL I haven't thought of it that way, but Chevrolet sold a lot of Nova cars (started out as the Chevy II in 1962) between 1968 and 1987. They sold 1.7 million between 1968-1974 in 3rd generation alone so the name didn't bother the customer too much.

    Anyway I'm assuming the same G3 series that plagued Aris' review of the G3 450 is now okay with the 650.

    EDIT: I saw in that original review an update stated that EVGA advised all units since that review are made by SF and not outsourced to RSY. Aris does that mean the first batch of those G3 450s were RSY built?

    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/evga-450-b3-psu,5160.html
    Reply
  • bit_user
    20899713 said:
    20898091 said:
    I'm sure it's been said before, but it's worth repeating: SuperNova is a terrible name for a PSU!

    LOL I haven't thought of it that way, but Chevrolet sold a lot of Nova cars (started out as the Chevy II in 1962) between 1968 and 1987. They sold 1.7 million between 1968-1974 in 3rd generation alone so the name didn't bother the customer too much.
    Maybe b/c regular novas don't produce black holes? Also, not sure how violent they are, as a supernova is thought to be different from novas in more than just scale.
    Reply
  • powernod
    nice PSU but it's unacceptable for a 650watt PowerSupply to have only 1 EPS connector.(EDIT: BeQuiet's 550watt DarkPowerPro11 has 2-EPS!! https://www.bequiet.com/en/powersupply/611 ) Even older AM3+ motherboards such as the ASUS CrosshairV Formula-Z that my brother has, use an 1x8 & 1x4 ATX12V power connector , so this PSU would be unable to power this kind of mobo!!
    Once again, excellent review by @Aris !! The best & most thorough PSU reviewer currently !!
    Reply