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Gigabyte X570 Aorus Elite Motherboard Review: Sub-$200 Goodness

How We Test

We’ll be comparing the Gigabyte X570 Aorus Elite to the Asus TUF Gaming X570-Plus Wi-Fi since it is similarly priced. We’ve also included the Gigabyte X570 Aorus Pro Wi-Fi and Biostar X570GT8 for additional datasets.

Comparison Products

While we tested this Gigabyte board at a different location than our previous X570 reviews, our review systems are as close as possible to running the same specifications. Though our memory may be different, the speed and primary timings are the same as well as the GPU. We use as an updated W10 64-bit OS with all threat mitigations applied.

Test System Components

SoundIntegrated HD audio
NetworkIntegrated gigabit networking
Graphics DriverGeForce 413.36

Benchmark Settings

Synthetic Benchmarks and Settings
PCMark 10Version 2.0.2115 64Essentials, Productivity, Digital Content Creation, MS Office
3DMarkVersion 2.9.6631 64Firestrike Extreme and Time Spy Default Preset
Cinebench R15Build RC184115DEMOOpenGL Benchmark - Single and Multi-threaded
Cinebench R20Version RBBENCHMARK281795Open GL Benchmark - Single and Multi-threaded
Application Tests and Settings
LAME MP3Version SSE2_2019Mixed 271MB WAV to mp3: Command: -b 160 --nores (160Kb/s)
HandBrake CLIVersion: 1.2.2Sintel Open Movie Project: 4.19GB 4K mkv to x264 (light AVX) and x265 (heavy AVX)
Corona 1.4Version 1.4Custom benchmark
7-ZipVersion 19.00Integrated benchmark
Game Tests and Settings
Ashes of the Singularity: EscalationVersion 1.31.21360High Preset - 1920 x 1080 / 2560 x 1440Crazy Preset - 1920 x 1080 / 2560 x 1440
F1 20172017 Season, Abu Dhabi track, RainMedium PresetUltra High Preset

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  • alan.campbell99
    I ended up going for this motherboard shortly after the Ryzen 3000 CPUs dropped. It's working well for me so far. My considerations were cost, PCIe16 slots and m.2 heatsink scheme. I wanted two PCIe16s so I could add in my SAS card, I wanted separate m.2 heatsinks that didn't require messing with the chipset heatsink, I also didn't need lots of SATA as I use two NVME drives and a bunch of SAS SSDs I acquired. No optical drive in this build either so presently not using any SATA ports.
    Reply
  • atombombe
    Recently upgraded to a Ryzen 3700X cpu and needed a motherboard. After searching a lot I finally chose to Gigabyte Aorus Elite X570. First Gigabyte product I own. Not afraid of buying more from the Gigabyte brand in the future.

    What made me buy this board over other products was the Intel lan, Realtek ALC1200 audio codec and also every review states that the board had good VRMs. Not that I'm a huge overclocker, but I chose good VRMs because of future expand-ability. I might get some better CPU with more cores and then need the extra power on the board.

    It has been very easy to build the computer. Everything just worked. Put in DDR4 3200 CL14 ram, chose XMP in bios and it has been running without any hickups!
    Reply
  • robert40
    it is funny
    "Elite was able to push our Ryzen 7 3700X to 4.16 GHz at 1.32V. Anything beyond this point yielded a near-instant stoppage of AIDA64’s stress test "

    this cpu is 3.6gh -4.4 gh without overlocking:)
    Reply
  • SovereignKnight
    robert40 said:
    it is funny
    "Elite was able to push our Ryzen 7 3700X to 4.16 GHz at 1.32V. Anything beyond this point yielded a near-instant stoppage of AIDA64’s stress test "

    this cpu is 3.6gh -4.4 gh without overlocking:)

    That is 4.4 GHz on ONE or TWO cores. The rest of the cores are running @ ~ 3.6-3.8 GHz.

    The overclock in this review is 4.16 GHz on ALL cores.

    It takes a hell of allot of power to push all cores to 4.16 GHz, vs. just 1 or 2 cores at 4.4 GHz.

    That also takes more voltage, in turn creating more heat.

    The benefit in this case for overclocking all cores to 4.16 GHz is, you get one hell of a multi threaded boost for any application that will use more than one or two cores.
    Reply
  • raposa
    SovereignKnight said:
    That is 4.4 GHz on ONE or TWO cores. The rest of the cores are running @ ~ 3.6-3.8 GHz.

    The overclock in this review is 4.16 GHz on ALL cores.

    It takes a hell of allot of power to push all cores to 4.16 GHz, vs. just 1 or 2 cores at 4.4 GHz.

    That also takes more voltage, in turn creating more heat.

    The benefit in this case for overclocking all cores to 4.16 GHz is, you get one hell of a multi threaded boost for any application that will use more than one or two cores.

    Do you mean a higher Tier motherboard, would provide more power, thus providing better mult-thread perfomance? Thus maximizing potential of multicore processores, like 3900x/3950x?
    Reply
  • robert40
    SovereignKnight said:
    That is 4.4 GHz on ONE or TWO cores. The rest of the cores are running @ ~ 3.6-3.8 GHz.

    The overclock in this review is 4.16 GHz on ALL cores.

    It takes a hell of allot of power to push all cores to 4.16 GHz, vs. just 1 or 2 cores at 4.4 GHz.

    That also takes more voltage, in turn creating more heat.

    The benefit in this case for overclocking all cores to 4.16 GHz is, you get one hell of a multi threaded boost for any application that will use more than one or two cores.
    You are right! Sorry.I am new on amd (ryzen 5 3600) from intel I5 3570k (z77) and from 3400mhz to 4200 all core (4 core) without + voltage or anything else.......just change the multiper.On 4300 just work 3 core and 4th core must put just 4200mhx.But i am sure + little voltage will fine.and more....
    so amd is different(:
    but still the best value....
    Reply
  • kadir8804
    robert40 said:
    it is funny
    "Elite was able to push our Ryzen 7 3700X to 4.16 GHz at 1.32V. Anything beyond this point yielded a near-instant stoppage of AIDA64’s stress test "

    this cpu is 3.6gh -4.4 gh without overlocking:)
    check your configuration I have that board and that micro at 4.25 1.25v without problems
    Reply
  • Ancient Alien
    Wow, I must have bad luck. I have been building my own systems since 1996. Purchased the X570 Aorus Elite in Dec 2019. BIOS erased the partitions on 5 HHDs totaling 16TB. Returned for a replacement and new board wouldn't recognize any drives but one. Came with f4 BIOS, so I downloaded the f20 BIOS to flash. BIOS recognized the USB drive, but I couldn't save or load from it. Sometimes, while booting, the BIOS screen would come up without pressing the delete key and would do this several times before I finally got the OS to load. Had random system freeze ups that became more frequent. Ended up calling it a $200 loss and replaced it with a MSI MEG X570 Tomahawk WiFi and the system behaves well now. No more Gigabyte products for me.
    Reply