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US Navy Installing AMD Epyc, Nvidia Volta-Powered Supercomputer

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The U.S. Navy Department of Defense Supercomputing Resource Center (DSRC) on Monday announced plans to install its first supercomputer with a peak performance of over 10 petaflops (12.8 petaflopsto be exact). Cray will build the supercomputer on its Shasta platform, and the supercomputer will come packing AMD Epyc CPUs and Nvidia Volta V100 GPUs.

Packing 12.8 petaflops would qualify the supercomputer to be one the top 25 most powerful computers today. However, the Navy won't finish installation for this supercomputer until 2021, so it's ranking may end up being lower by then. 

"The investment and increase in supercomputing power at the Navy DSRC at Stennis Space Center is absolutely critical to Naval Oceanography delivering future capability upgrades to global and regional ocean and atmospheric prediction systems to include later this year the Navy’s first Earth Systems Prediction Capability," Rear Admiral John Okon, head of Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Command, said in a statement accompanying the announcement. 

"Naval Oceanography’s ability to be the Department of Defense’s authoritative source for characterizing and applying data of the physical battlespace into a decisive advantage for naval, joint and allied forces hinges on the continual upgrade and advancements in high-performance computing from the HPCMP [High Performance Computing Modernization Program]."

The new Cray supercomputer will feature 290,304 AMD Epyc 7002-series processor cores, 112 Nvidia Volta V100 GPUs, a 200 gigabit per second Cray Slingshot network interconnect, 590TB of memory and 14 petabytes of usable storage. 

All this power will be used for aircraft, ships and environmental modeling. It will also track hurricanes and their intensity. The Navy’s new supercomputer is set to live in the same Mississippi location where a U.S. Department of Homeland Security data center will also be built.  

That's just one Cray Shata supercomputer making its way into the U.S.' defense system. In August, Cray signed three high-performance computing contracts with the Pentagon worth more than $71 million: one for the U.S. Air Force and one Cray CS500 cluster supercomputer each for the Army Research Lab and U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center. 

  • bit_user
    the supercomputer will come packing AMD Epyc CPUs and Nvidia Volta V100 GPUs.
    I sure hope they got a good deal on those > 2.5 year old GPUs. Maybe the plan is also to upgrade them, once the next gen is out. 112 doesn't sound like too many, but then list price is $10k, each.
    Reply
  • Spaceghaze
    bit_user said:
    I sure hope they got a good deal on those > 2.5 year old GPUs. Maybe the plan is also to upgrade them, once the next gen is out. 112 doesn't sound like too many, but then list price is $10k, each.

    They go for less though, and they must have got a better deal on them when buying 112 of them. But i agree it better be a good one at this point. Then again who knows when the next gen will come. If they need it now, they will get it now. It's not like the private marked that can just wait for next gen.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Spaceghaze said:
    Then again who knows when the next gen will come.
    According to this, the next-gen HPC model sounds like it'll be shipping this summer.

    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/cray-supercomputer-indiana-university-amd-nvidia
    Reply
  • Spaceghaze
    bit_user said:
    According to this, the next-gen HPC model sounds like it'll be shipping this summer.

    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/cray-supercomputer-indiana-university-amd-nvidia

    I did read that article earlier, but it only states that they are planning to install the GPU's in the upcoming fall or i'm i missing something?

    I guess it would make sense if Nvidia do reveal more information or release date in the keynote in March as stated in the article, that they would most likely be released in the summer, which then again lines up with the planned installation in the fall.

    Will be interesting to see if this actually does happen. Then we can look at that as an early leak of the release date/period.

    Edit; Forgot, that it mentions they postponed the installation of the GPU's until the summer, with planned installation in fall. So in other words, they postponed it until the fall.
    Reply
  • kep55
    bit_user said:
    I sure hope they got a good deal on those > 2.5 year old GPUs. Maybe the plan is also to upgrade them, once the next gen is out. 112 doesn't sound like too many, but then list price is $10k, each.
    Oh, wow. The GPUs are two and a half years old. They won't be able to play Duke Nukem. BIG DEAL! The machines are being used for scientific research, not to pleasure living at home geeks.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    kep55 said:
    Oh, wow. The GPUs are two and a half years old. They won't be able to play Duke Nukem. BIG DEAL! The machines are being used for scientific research, not to pleasure living at home geeks.
    I'm not sure why you'd think we don't know that.

    Check out the article I linked, above. Nvidia seems set to launch a newer HPC GPU to replace the V100. GPUs are still improving at a much faster rate than CPUs. If you know anything about HPC, they not only care about performance, but also TFLOPS/W, both of which are substantially improved in the newer generation - so much so, that Indiana University delayed their deployment for it.
    Reply