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Acer XR382CQK Curved FreeSync Monitor Review

Conclusion

We started off by saying that curved ultra-wide monitors are clearly here to stay and not just a passing folly. The XR382CQK only helps to solidify that statement. It is not a gimmick by any means, but a serious display with top-shelf performance and solid gaming chops. For those looking to move away from flat 16:9 panels, it represents a fairly expensive upgrade, but there is plenty of value here.

Judging from reader comments, resolution and panel technology are at the top of the purchase parameter list, with speed and adaptive refresh running a close second. This monitor offers 75Hz, which may not seem like a huge leap from 60Hz, but in gameplay situations, that extra 15 FPS makes a significant difference in smoothness and response. Retaining resolution during the fastest movement is paramount to keeping the gamer in the moment, and even though the XR deactivates its overdrive during FreeSync operation, we didn’t notice anything missing as long as the framerate remained above 60 FPS. And the IPS panel means viewing angles are among the best that LCD technology can offer.

Color and contrast are equal to the better gaming monitors we’ve tested, so there is no real separator when it comes to accuracy and image depth. The XR328CQK offers the same picture quality as any other premium gaming display. Once you factor in the curve and the sheer size of that expansive screen, however, the choice becomes clearer.

The one thing every gamer will enjoy about the XR382CQK is its immersive effect. We’ve already extolled the virtues of curved ultra-wide monitors, but the 38”-class screens take it to a whole new level. At 20-30” away, the viewer’s peripheral vision is completely filled with the image, and its height ensures you won’t be easily taken out of the moment. Once you’ve experienced first-person gaming on a monitor like this, price concerns quickly fall away—at least for those with the wallets to even consider an option like this.

Early curved screens caused a bit of sticker shock for consumers, and prices haven’t really come down much in the past two years. But considering that new models are appearing just as regularly as their flat counterparts, buyers must be embracing them. Remember that a monitor is something that can last through multiple hardware upgrades. Five years is not a difficult goal to reach. And the XR382CQK’s high resolution adds a point in that column.

For its superb gaming performance, smooth motion processing, and immersive screen size, we’re giving the Acer XR382CQK our Editor Recommended Award.


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  • toddybody
    Hasnt this monitor been available for a while? I feel like Tom's is often behind the release curve of most displays.
    Reply
  • Lucky_SLS
    isnt the G sync version cheaper than this? the X34A got a 100hz refresh rate. strange to see a similarly spec'ed free sync monitor costing more than a G sync one. would have been convincing if it had HDR
    Reply
  • shrapnel_indie
    Would have liked to see the Response Time (GTG) a little lower, say 3 or 4, for the price range.... but 5ms just makes the cut for gaming. The cost is truly a bit pricey, but at least it is an IPS panel for the cost.
    Reply
  • Ryguy64
    Why do Freesync monitors always have such a narrow range when it comes to variable refresh? I would love to get a Freesync monitor buy my RX 480 probably couldn't keep up with 48 fps in plenty of games at this resolution.
    Reply
  • shrapnel_indie
    19757349 said:
    isnt the G sync version cheaper than this? the X34A got a 100hz refresh rate. strange to see a similarly spec'ed free sync monitor costing more than a G sync one. would have been convincing if it had HDR

    If I were to just use PCPartPicker.com as a guide, This XR382CQK model is the only model Acer has at this resolution. The LG 38UC99-W, being the only other one at the same/similar specs, is just shy of $400 USD more expensive.

    Also note that the XT382CQK is 38" class (37.5") and the XR342CK, Predator X34, and Predator XR341CK are 34" class (34".) The X34 itself being the 100Hz, 4ms IPS panel (The XR341CK is the only one that is 75Hz 4ms, the XR342CQK is 75Hz 5ms.) These 34" class monitors are also 3440 x 1440 instead of 3840 x 1600.
    Reply
  • JakeWearingKhakis
    Check out this monitor that I have.

    Viotek GN27C - $249.00
    27" Curved 1800
    1080p
    144hz Freesync (minimum is around 30hz I think)
    3 or 4 ms response time with a boost option in the settings
    VA Panel 16:9, 20,000,000:1 Dynamic Contrast

    All at $249.00. No it's not the latest Acer Predator, but it's a serious gamer's dream.
    Reply
  • shrapnel_indie
    19758109 said:
    Check out this monitor that I have.

    Viotek GN27C - $249.00
    27" Curved 1800
    1080p
    144hz Freesync (minimum is around 30hz I think)
    3 or 4 ms response time with a boost option in the settings
    VA Panel 16:9, 20,000,000:1 Dynamic Contrast

    All at $249.00. No it's not the latest Acer Predator, but it's a serious gamer's dream.

    Source?
    Reply
  • WyomingKnott
    Why no portrait mode?

    (just kidding)
    Reply
  • bjornl
    Pity there is no G-Sync version. Free-sync = entirely uninteresting to me.
    Reply
  • photonboy
    It's almost exactly the width of my entire DESK.
    Reply