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Acer XR382CQK Curved FreeSync Monitor Review

Brightness & Contrast

To read about our monitor tests in depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test Monitors and TVs.Brightness and Contrast testing is covered on page two.

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

We have a goodly number of curved ultra-wides in our database to stack up against the Acer XR382CQK. Sharing the same panel part is the LG 38UC99. We have high-end 34” screens from Acer (Predator X34) and Asus ROG (PG348Q). From LG we also have the 34UC79G, and AOC represents the VA camp with its C3583FQ, which has lower resolution but tremendous contrast.

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Most 16:9 flat panels can top 350cd/m2 peak, but curved ultra-wides are doing well to exceed 300. The XR382CQK turns in a respectable 321.8172cd/m2 white level, which is plenty for its intended purpose. It doesn’t have a backlight strobe, so extra headroom isn’t necessary. And the sheer size of the screen may have you lowering the brightness from your usual setting. We found 200cd/m2 a little too intense for our tastes.

Black levels are towards the back of the group, but Acer still manages to squeak over the 1000:1 threshold in the sequential contrast calculation. This is about as good as it gets for IPS. Only VA offers significantly more depth, but it hasn’t quite reached the pixel density of other technologies.

Uncalibrated – Minimum Backlight Level

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The backlight’s minimum setting is a bit below the useful level but not too much. Brightness can still be set with decent precision over a wide range of values. Contrast remains reasonably consistent at 988.2:1. If you want to see 50cd/m2, set the slider to 5.

After Calibration to 200cd/m2

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We had to lower the contrast slider to solve a clipping issue; hence the drop in ratio. You can maintain around 1000:1 if you leave it set to 50, but some highlight detail will wash out and the brightest whites will look a little blue. It’s a minor issue, but we opted for maximum detail at all brightness levels. 918.3 is still perfectly respectable. The main factor here is a black level that’s a tad higher than the other monitors.

ANSI Contrast Ratio

Happily, the ANSI test reveals a slightly higher 945.1:1 ratio. We have yet to see anything but quality panels in all the curved monitors we’ve reviewed and the XR382CQK is no exception. Later, you’ll see that our uniformity tests support that statement. Quality control is not an issue here.


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  • toddybody
    Hasnt this monitor been available for a while? I feel like Tom's is often behind the release curve of most displays.
    Reply
  • Lucky_SLS
    isnt the G sync version cheaper than this? the X34A got a 100hz refresh rate. strange to see a similarly spec'ed free sync monitor costing more than a G sync one. would have been convincing if it had HDR
    Reply
  • shrapnel_indie
    Would have liked to see the Response Time (GTG) a little lower, say 3 or 4, for the price range.... but 5ms just makes the cut for gaming. The cost is truly a bit pricey, but at least it is an IPS panel for the cost.
    Reply
  • Ryguy64
    Why do Freesync monitors always have such a narrow range when it comes to variable refresh? I would love to get a Freesync monitor buy my RX 480 probably couldn't keep up with 48 fps in plenty of games at this resolution.
    Reply
  • shrapnel_indie
    19757349 said:
    isnt the G sync version cheaper than this? the X34A got a 100hz refresh rate. strange to see a similarly spec'ed free sync monitor costing more than a G sync one. would have been convincing if it had HDR

    If I were to just use PCPartPicker.com as a guide, This XR382CQK model is the only model Acer has at this resolution. The LG 38UC99-W, being the only other one at the same/similar specs, is just shy of $400 USD more expensive.

    Also note that the XT382CQK is 38" class (37.5") and the XR342CK, Predator X34, and Predator XR341CK are 34" class (34".) The X34 itself being the 100Hz, 4ms IPS panel (The XR341CK is the only one that is 75Hz 4ms, the XR342CQK is 75Hz 5ms.) These 34" class monitors are also 3440 x 1440 instead of 3840 x 1600.
    Reply
  • JakeWearingKhakis
    Check out this monitor that I have.

    Viotek GN27C - $249.00
    27" Curved 1800
    1080p
    144hz Freesync (minimum is around 30hz I think)
    3 or 4 ms response time with a boost option in the settings
    VA Panel 16:9, 20,000,000:1 Dynamic Contrast

    All at $249.00. No it's not the latest Acer Predator, but it's a serious gamer's dream.
    Reply
  • shrapnel_indie
    19758109 said:
    Check out this monitor that I have.

    Viotek GN27C - $249.00
    27" Curved 1800
    1080p
    144hz Freesync (minimum is around 30hz I think)
    3 or 4 ms response time with a boost option in the settings
    VA Panel 16:9, 20,000,000:1 Dynamic Contrast

    All at $249.00. No it's not the latest Acer Predator, but it's a serious gamer's dream.

    Source?
    Reply
  • WyomingKnott
    Why no portrait mode?

    (just kidding)
    Reply
  • bjornl
    Pity there is no G-Sync version. Free-sync = entirely uninteresting to me.
    Reply
  • photonboy
    It's almost exactly the width of my entire DESK.
    Reply