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Corsair Intros 3000MHz Vengeance Extreme DDR3 Kit

By - Source: Corsair | B 32 comments

Corsair has introduced a limited edition memory kit rated at 3000 MHz.

Corsair launched what it boasts to be the world's fastest rated production PC memory kit: the new Vengeance Extreme 8 GB dual-channel DDR3 kit. The kit's two 4 GB memory chips are rated at a blazing 3,000 MHz (air cooled), and fitted with low profile "Corsair Racing Red" heat spreaders. They also have latency settings of 12-14-14-36, at 1.65V.

"The extreme-speed 3000 MHz rating of the Vengeance Extreme memory kits is the result of a rigorous internal four-stage hand-screening process performed by Corsair engineers," the company said. "This process is passed by fewer than one in 50 memory ICs. Performance qualification is performed on select Intel Z77 based motherboards, including the ASUS P8Z77-I DELUXE and ASRock Z77 OC Formula."

To hit their rated speeds, the modules require an unlocked third-generation Intel Core processor with an Integrated Memory Controller capable of running 3,000 MHz. However, speed freaks will be treated to a Kingpin Cooling memory cooler, which is included for overclockers who want to use LN2 (liquid nitrogen) to reach memory speeds well beyond 3,000 MHz.

"There's a reason why world-champion overclockers, extreme gaming enthusiasts and high-end system builders all trust Corsair for high-performance memory that they can install with confidence and pride," the company said. "Whether you're breaking your own records or you're simply building a dream gaming rig, you can count on Corsair memory."

As expected, the Vengeance Extreme 8 GB dual-channel DDR3 kit won't come cheap, costing a hefty USD 749. Corsair said these super-fast memory chips are hand-built, so quantities will be extremely limited. That said, the new kit will be made available exclusively from Corsair sometime in March, so stay tuned.

 

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  • 21 Hide
    stalefish , March 18, 2013 7:06 AM
    remember when RAMs were rated at CL2?

    Pepperidge Farm Remembers
  • 15 Hide
    wanderer11 , March 18, 2013 7:02 AM
    I'd like to see a benchmark with an APU. Let's see how much faster memory really helps.
  • 15 Hide
    TheMadFapper , March 18, 2013 9:09 AM
    With that price point I'd rather buy an ASUS GTX 680, 16GB of 1600Mhz RAM, and a lap dance.
Other Comments
  • 15 Hide
    wanderer11 , March 18, 2013 7:02 AM
    I'd like to see a benchmark with an APU. Let's see how much faster memory really helps.
  • 21 Hide
    stalefish , March 18, 2013 7:06 AM
    remember when RAMs were rated at CL2?

    Pepperidge Farm Remembers
  • 5 Hide
    guru_urug , March 18, 2013 7:08 AM
    ^^
    Even if it did, it wouldnt be economical. You can build a whole better system at the cost of the RAM itself. Still, it would be interesting to see the gains of such fast memory on an APU.
  • 7 Hide
    dish_moose , March 18, 2013 7:09 AM
    Give me 3000MHz at 1.5V - then that would be something.
  • 5 Hide
    toms my babys daddy , March 18, 2013 7:18 AM
    Our Price:
    $749.99
  • 1 Hide
    thefiend1 , March 18, 2013 8:41 AM
    MOAR SPEED!
  • 7 Hide
    crisan_tiberiu , March 18, 2013 8:45 AM
    wanderer11I'd like to see a benchmark with an APU. Let's see how much faster memory really helps.

    Probably the gains are massive but @ this price they are pointless....
  • 3 Hide
    Cons29 , March 18, 2013 9:02 AM
    are you kidding me? With that price id rather get a 670 plus ram or whatever i can buy with the extra greens
  • 15 Hide
    TheMadFapper , March 18, 2013 9:09 AM
    With that price point I'd rather buy an ASUS GTX 680, 16GB of 1600Mhz RAM, and a lap dance.
  • 6 Hide
    shloader , March 18, 2013 9:40 AM
    Ball players need compz, too. This is for the same crowd that takes a pair of Samsung 512GB 840 Pros and throws them in Raid 0.

    "Coarsair said these super-fast memory chips are hand-built"... uh huh. With inhuman soldering skills.
  • 2 Hide
    06yfz450ridr , March 18, 2013 9:44 AM
    wanderer11I'd like to see a benchmark with an APU. Let's see how much faster memory really helps.



    they already have on here and it does help a little bit but anything over 1866 there was only a slight boost in fps. its the lower latency settings that really give you a bigger boost
  • 1 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , March 18, 2013 10:04 AM
    wanderer11I'd like to see a benchmark with an APU. Let's see how much faster memory really helps.

    Remember ? I'm gonna go with "kinda, not really, who cares, save your money and put it towards GPU".
  • 4 Hide
    Nebby , March 18, 2013 11:09 AM
    06yfz450ridrthey already have on here and it does help a little bit but anything over 1866 there was only a slight boost in fps. its the lower latency settings that really give you a bigger boost



    Maybe its Super Human solders =) with computer precision
  • -3 Hide
    falchard , March 18, 2013 12:00 PM
    OMG 3000 MHz!!!, and your CPU still limits you to 1600 mhz.
  • 3 Hide
    bryonhowley , March 18, 2013 12:45 PM
    Well I can think of a lot of things to spend that kind of money on besides 8gig of ram!
  • 3 Hide
    chicofehr , March 18, 2013 1:03 PM
    Reduce the latencies first!!!! 12 is way too high. I want 1600MHz with a latency of 2 or 3, and once we get there, then we can start talking about more speed. They concentrate too much on speed when its the latencies that are making the speed increase somewhat less impressive in real life performance.
  • 2 Hide
    g-unit1111 , March 18, 2013 1:10 PM
    MORE POWER!!!!! *cue Tim Allen grunt*
  • 2 Hide
    InvalidError , March 18, 2013 1:47 PM
    wanderer11I'd like to see a benchmark with an APU. Let's see how much faster memory really helps.

    AMD's APUs got benchmarked with RAM at least up to 2400MT/s and there was almost no improvement with going over 2133MT/s. It seems unlikely there would be much if any gains to be made from bumping rates to 3000MT/s on current APUs... certainly not any that could justify the huge price premium on those DIMMs.
  • 2 Hide
    blazorthon , March 18, 2013 1:56 PM
    06yfz450ridrthey already have on here and it does help a little bit but anything over 1866 there was only a slight boost in fps. its the lower latency settings that really give you a bigger boost


    The "latency settings" generally do not give that much of a boost. That's why GPU memory is always focused on bandwidth over latency. Latency does matter, but it is almost always less important than bandwidth.

    06yfz450ridrthey already have on here and it does help a little bit but anything over 1866 there was only a slight boost in fps. its the lower latency settings that really give you a bigger boost


    According to Tom's, it's not until after DDR3-2133 where there is a serious cut-off in performance for the top Trinity desktop APUs gain and even then, it might have been a different issue than the GPU not being able to take advantage of greater memory bandwidth.
  • 1 Hide
    InvalidError , March 18, 2013 2:08 PM
    blazorthonNo, the "latency settings" do not give that much of a boost. That's why GPU memory is always focused on bandwidth over latency.

    The importance of latency varies depending on workload-specific access patterns.

    Most heavy computational workloads like rendering, transcoding, physics simulations, etc. lend themselves pretty well to long read/write stripes on RAM and will heavily favor bandwidth over latency like GPUs do.

    Heavily conditional (branchy) code like compilers, control code for interactive applications, algorithms that rely on sparse arrays, trees and other branchy structures, cache misses are far more common and these scenarios will heavily favor low latency.
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