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AMD: A-Series APUs (Trinity/Llano)

CPU Charts 2012: 86 Processors From AMD And Intel, Tested
By , Achim Roos

AMD's Fusion initiative sought to combine host processing and graphics resources in the same chip, ideally circumventing the need for separate CPUs and graphics cards in mainstream PCs. In many ways, this is similar to what Intel does with its Sandy and Ivy Bridge architectures, though Intel more heavily emphasizes x86 performance, while AMD's strength is its GPUs.

A disagreement with another vendor led AMD to move away from its Fusion brand and adopt Heterogeneous Systems Architecture, or HSA. The SoCs belonging to both efforts are referred to as APUs (accelerated processing units). 

The first desktop APUs emerged under the code name Llano in 2011, and were manufactured using a 32 nm process. They combined AMD's Stars architecture without L3 cache and its Evergreen graphics design. Second-generation Trinity-based APUs employ the company's most modern Piledriver CPU architecture and its VLIW4 graphics configuration (the same shader arrangement found on Radeon HD 6900-series cards).

More information:


Benchmarked AMD Fusion-Based APUs:

A-Series
Code NameRev.CPU SocketNumber of Cores
Clock Frequency
L2 CacheiGPUMemory Controller
TDP
A6-3650LlanoB0FM142.6 GHz4 x 1024 KBHD 6530D
444 MHz
integrated up to DDR3-1866100 W
A6-3670KLlanoB0FM142.7 GHz4 x 1024 KBHD 6530D
444 MHz
integrated up to DDR3-1866100 W
A8-3850LlanoB0FM142.9 GHz4 x 1024 KBHD 6550D
600MHz
integrated up to DDR3-1866100 W
A8-3870KLlanoB0FM143.0 GHz4 x 1024 KBHD 6550D
600MHz
integrated up to DDR3-1866100 W
A10-5800KTrinityA1FM243.8 GHz2 x 2048 KBHD 7660D
800 MHz
integrated up to DDR3-1866100 W
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