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AMD Ryzen Pro 4000 Mobile CPUs Arrive With Double the Cores

AMD Ryzen Pro 4000

AMD Ryzen Pro 4000 (Image credit: AMD)

Professionals need a system that can drive productivity while being secure, and that's exactly what AMD's new trio of Ryzen Pro 4000 mobile CPUs aim to offer. The chips, based on AMD's latest Zen 2 microarchitecture, will land in business laptops, replacing the chipmaker's previous offerings. 

AMD Ryzen Pro 4000 processors are built with TSMC's 7nm FinFET manufacturing process. The new chips should deliver significant performance uplifts on all fronts in comparison to their predecessors. The combination of the 7nm process node and Zen 2 has allowed AMD to offer up to twice the number of cores on this generation of Ryzen Pro processors.

Unlike mainstream processors, AMD's Ryzen Pro 4000 portfolio comes with a medley of security features, including AMD Memory Guard that offers complete memory encryption to safeguard important data. AMD also says it works with Microsoft and other OEM partners, such as HP and Lenovo, to create a secure ecosystem.

Another one of the Ryzen Pro 4000 family's more noteworthy features has AMD pledging  to provide up to 18 months of image stability and a guaranteed availability of up to 24 months.

AMD Ryzen Pro 4000 Specifications

Liek with the prior generation, AMD has launched three Ryzen Pro 4000 chips. As usual, AMD is offering the mobile chips at three different tiers: Ryzen 7 Pro, Ryzen 5 Pro and Ryzen 3 Pro. The "U" suffix in the model names indicates that the processors adhere to a 15W TDP and are, therefore, aimed at ultra-thin laptops specifically. 

AMD is touting performance improvements over the prior generation of up to 29% and 132% in single and multi-threaded workloads, respectively, for the Ryzen 7 Pro SKU. 

Even though the Ryzen Pro 4000-series still relies on Vega cores for graphics, the new processors do come with a decent upgrade under the hood. AMD estimates a 13% improvement in the graphics department.

ModelCores / ThreadsBase / Boost Clock (GHz)Cache (MB)TDP (W)
AMD Ryzen 7 Pro 4750U8 / 161.7 / 4.11215
AMD Ryzen 5 Pro 4650U6 / 122.1 / 4.01115
AMD Ryzen 3 Pro 4450U4 / 82.5 / 3.7615
AMD Ryzen 7 Pro 3700U4 / 82.3 / 4.0615
AMD Ryzen 5 Pro 3500U4 / 82.1 / 3.7615
AMD Ryzen 3 Pro 3300U4 / 42.1 / 3.5615

The Ryzen 7 Pro 4750U is this generation's flagship, proudly sporting eight CPU cores and 16 threads, double that of the previous flagship. The Ryzen 5 Pro 4650U comes equipped with two more cores in comparison to the Ryzen 5 Pro 3500U. The Ryzen 3 Pro 4450U didn't receive any core upgrades, but now enjoys SMT (simultaneous multithreading).

Besides the obvious core upgrades, the Ryzen Pro 4000-series also arrives with more cache. The base configuration starts at 6MB and goes up to 12MB, while the previous generation of processors was limited to 6MB across the board.

Being a mobile product, performance and security aren't the Ryzen Pro 4000 series' only notable traits. Apparently, battery life is pretty good too. AMD promised a duration up to 20 hours. Of course, actual mileage will vary depending on the model of the device and workloads, but the figure is still promising.

AMD Ryzen 4000 Pro Release Date 

Lenovo will be among the first manufacturers to hop on the Ryzen Pro 4000 bandwagon. The company's first generation of ThinkPad T14, T14s, X13 and L14/14 devices will all leverage AMD Ryzen Pro 4000 processors. AMD's announcement said that HP will also release laptops with these chips, with both Lenovo and HP planning release dates of H1 2020. 

  • bit_user
    I know this is concerning laptop CPUs, but AMD should really consider selling their AM4 Ryzen Pro APUs to the mass market. Even if it's direct from their website.

    These would be really popular among home NAS builders who want ECC memory and no dGPU. Otherwise, we're stuck using Intel i3's.
    Reply
  • dlee67
    bit_user said:
    I know this is concerning laptop CPUs, but AMD should really consider selling their AM4 Ryzen Pro APUs to the mass market. Even if it's direct from their website.

    These would be really popular among home NAS builders who want ECC memory and no dGPU. Otherwise, we're stuck using Intel i3's.

    Even the non-pro models are appealing on the high -end for AMD usff nuc-like boxes; the 4900HS would make excellent sense in a box like the NUC 9 Extreme for those who would want dGPU and encased in a shell otherwise
    Reply