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Datalogic's MX-E Series Vision Processors Offer Myriad Configurations

Datalogic, a producer of bar code readers, mobile computers, sensors, vision systems and laser marking equipment, announced a new series of vision processors featuring Intel CPUs and chipsets, and multiple PoE camera ports.

Datalogic launched three different MX-E vision processors. Each of the MX-E series vision processors allow for independent analysis and data collection from multiple cameras simultaneously. The vision processors feature power over Ethernet (PoE) camera ports that allow for a wide coverage space. Cameras can be positioned up to 100 meters away from the vision processor and don’t need an independent power source, so they can be positioned almost anywhere.

The MX-E20 is the company’s entry-level product. This system includes a 1.4 GHz Intel Celeron dual-core processor, 4GB of RAM and two independent gigabit PoE camera ports. The company said this system is ideal for companies that are interested in transitioning from smart-camera applications to an embedded vision system.

The MX-E40 offers a somewhat more powerful 2.2 GHz dual-core Celeron processor and gives you the option of two of four independent gigabit PoE camera ports. The MX-E40 is also housed in a rugged case designed for long-term use.

For larger installations that require higher resolution imaging and demand faster performance, Datalogic’s MX-E80 offers an Intel Core i7 processor and 8GB of memory. The MX-E80 is available with two or four gigabit PoE camera ports.

MX-E20MX-E40MX-E80
CPUIntel® Celeron 1047UE 1.4 Ghz – dual coreIntel® Celeron 1020E 2.2 Ghz – dual coreIntel® Core i7 3615QE 2.3 Ghz – quad core
System memory4 GB DDR3 RAM4 GB DDR3 RAM8 GB DDR3 RAM
Storage60 GB SATA SSD (MLC)60 GB SATA SSD (MLC)128 GB SATA SSD (MLC)
GraphicsIntel® HD 3000 (1920x1200 resolution) - DVIIntel® HD 3000 (1920x1200 resolution) - DVIIntel® HD 3000 (1920x1200 resolution) - DVI
Camera imager limit2Mpix or lowerNoneNone
Network interface2x LAN ports - 10/100/1000 Mbps Base-T2x LAN ports - 10/100/1000 Mbps Base-T2x LAN ports - 10/100/1000 Mbps Base-T
Serial communications1x RS-232 serial port1x RS-232 serial port1x RS-232 serial port
Keyboard/mouse4x USB3.0 ports4x USB3.0 ports4x USB3.0 ports
Comm connectivitySupports Ethernet/IP, Modbus TCP and OPCSupports Ethernet/IP, Modbus TCP and OPCSupports Ethernet/IP, Modbus TCP and OPC
Operating systemWindows Embedded Standard 7Windows Embedded Standard 7Windows Embedded Standard 7
Supply voltage24 VDC +/- 25%24 VDC +/- 25%24 VDC +/- 25%
Nominal current draw5.5 A @ 24 VDC5.5 A @ 24 VDC5.5 A @ 24 VDC
Dimensions270 (H) x 130 (W) x 255 (D) mm - 10.6 (H) x 5.1 (W) x 10 (D) in.270 (H) x 130 (W) x 255 (D) mm - 10.6 (H) x 5.1 (W) x 10 (D) in.270 (H) x 130 (W) x 255 (D) mm - 10.6 (H) x 5.1 (W) x 10 (D) in.
Weight2050 g2050 g2050 g
HousingGalvanized plate - plasticGalvanized plate - plasticGalvanized plate - plastic
Operating temperature0 to 55° C - 32 to 131° F0 to 55° C - 32 to 131° F0 to 55° C - 32 to 131° F
Operating humidity10 to 90% (non-condensing)10 to 90% (non-condensing)10 to 90% (non-condensing)
Mechanical protectionIP20IP20IP20
Certifications (safety compliance)CE, c-UL-usCE, c-UL-usCE, c-UL-us

Datalogic is also offering an array of camera options that pair with the company’s MX-E vision processors. The company offers the models of E-camera, which support varying resolutions and framerates. The E-cameras are compact and designed to fit into tight spaces. The M-cameras offer significantly more options. The company has 18 different areascan cameras that interface with PoE, and additional 16 camera models that don’t. Each one offers a different resolution, shutter speed, frame rate and imager. There are also four different linescan cameras to choose from.

E100 SERIES Cameras
Camera, E101, Gig-E, 659 x 480, 300 FPS, Grayscale, 1/4" CMOS959933022
Camera, E101C, Gig-E, 659 x 480, 300 FPS, Color, 1/4" CMOS959933023
Camera, E151, Gig-E, 1280 x 1024, 75 FPS, Grayscale, 1/2" CMOS959933024
Camera, E151C, Gig-E, 1280 x 1024, 75 FPS, Color, 1/2" CMOS959933025
Camera, E181, Gig-E, 1920 x 1200, 48 FPS, Grayscale, 2/3" CMOS959933026
Camera, E181C, Gig-E, 1920 x 1200, 48 FPS, Color, 2/3" CMOS959933027
Camera, E198, Gig-E, 2590 x 2048, 20 FPS, Grayscale, 1" CMOS959933028
Camera, E198C, Gig-E, 2590 x 2048, 20 FPS, Color, 1" CMOS959933029
M-Cameras
Camera, M100, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 100 FPS, Grayscale, 1/4" CCD601-0351
Camera, M100C, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 100 FPS, Color, 1/4" CCD601-0378
Camera, M110, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 90 FPS, Grayscale, 1/3" CCD601-0423
Camera, M110C, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 90 FPS, Color, 1/3" CCD601-0424
Camera, M115, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 100 FPS, Grayscale, 1/2" CCD601-0450
Camera, M115C, Gig-E,659 x 494, 100 FPS, Color, 1/2" CCD601-0451
Camera, M125, Gig-E, 782 x 582, 75 FPS, Grayscale, 1/2" CCD601-0452
Camera, M125C, Gig-E, 782 x 582, 75 FPS, Color, 1/2" CCD601-0453
Camera, M150, Gig-E, 1296 x 966, 30 FPS, Grayscale, 1/3" CCD601-0352
Camera, M150C, Gig-E, 1296 x 966, 30 FPS, Color, 1/3" CCD601-0379
Camera, M180, Gig-E, 1628 x 1236, 20 FPS, Grayscale, 1/1.8" CCD601-0357
Camera, M180C, Gig-E, 1628 x 1236, 20 FPS, Color, 1/1.8" CCD601-0384
Camera, M190, Gig-E, 2048 x 1088, 50 FPS, Grayscale, 2/3" CMOS601-0454
Camera, M190C, Gig-E, 2048 x 1088, 50 FPS, Color, 2/3" CMOS601-0455
Camera, M195, Gig-E, 2048 x 2048, 25 FPS, Grayscale, 1" CMOS601-0456
Camera, M195C, Gig-E, 2048 x 2048, 25 FPS, Color, 1" CMOS601-0457
Camera, M197, Gig-E, 2592 x 1944, 14 FPS, Grayscale, 1/2.5" CMOS959931010
Camera, M197C, Gig-E, 2592x1944, 14 FPS, Color, 1/2.5" CMOS959931011
Camera, M200, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 70 FPS, Grayscale, 1/3" CCD601-0358
Camera, M200C, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 70 FPS, Color, 1/3" CCD601-0385
Camera, M202, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 79 FPS, Grayscale, 1/2" CCD601-0359
Camera, M202C, Gig-E, 659 x 494, 79 FPS, Color, 1/2" CCD601-0386
Camera, M250, Gig-E, 1296 x 966, 32 FPS, Grayscale, 1/3" CCD601-0362
Camera, M250C, Gig-E, 1296 x 966, 32 FPS, Color, 1/3" CCD601-0389
Camera, M295, Gig-E, 1628 x 1236, 28 FPS, Grayscale, 1/1.8" CCD601-0420
Camera, M295C, Gig-E, 1628 x 1236, 28 FPS, Color, 1/1.8" CCD601-0421
Camera, M300, Gig-E, 648 x 488, 210 FPS, Grayscale, 1/3" CCD601-0354
Camera, M300C, Gig-E, 648 x 488, 210 FPS, Color, 1/3" CCD601-0381
Camera, M330, Gig-E, 1004 x 1004, 60 FPS, Grayscale, 2/3" CCD601-0364
Camera, M330C, Gig-E, 1004 x 1004, 60 FPS, Color, 2/3" CCD601-0391
Camera, M350, Gig-E, 1608 x 1208, 35 FPS, Grayscale, 1" CCD601-0365
Camera, M350C, Gig-E, 1608 x 1208, 35 FPS, Color, 1" CCD601-0392
Camera, M390, Gig-E, 2448 x 2050 (5MP), 17 FPS, Grayscale, 2/3" CCD601-0355
Camera, M390C, Gig-E, 2448 x 2050 (5MP), 17 FPS, Color, 2/3" CCD601-0382
Camera, M565, Gig-E, 2048 Linescan, 51KHz, Grayscale959931002
Camera, M570, Gig-E, 4096 Linescan, 26KHz, Grayscale959931003
Camera, M575, Gig-E, 6144 Linescan, 17KHz, Grayscale959933020
Camera, M580, Gig-E, 8192 Linescan, 12KHz, Grayscale95993302

In other words, Datalogic should be able to provide a camera solution for every conceivable installation. The company said that ME-E vision processors can be used for “robot and laser guidance, electronic component and PCB inspection, automotive part and component verification, and packaging quality check.”

Datalogic’s MX-E series is powered by the company’s Impact human machine interface (HMI) software suite. Impact allows you to create your own interfaces and inspection programs that suit your specific needs. The software consists of two components: Vision Program Manager (VPM) and Control Panel Manager (CPM). VPM is used for image processing and analysis. The company said it includes hundreds of different functions, such as image enhancement, object measurement and even the ability to read and decipher text and barcodes. CPM lets you make “on-the-fly adjustments to critical machine controls.” An SDK is included with the package that includes everything you need to start building HMI tools that work with Datalogic vision devices.

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 Kevin Carbotte is a contributing writer for Tom's Hardware who primarily covers VR and AR hardware. He has been writing for us for more than four years.