Thermal Grizzly's Contact Frame Reduces Alder Lake Temps by 10 Degrees Celsius

Thermal Grizzly
(Image credit: Thermal Grizzly)

Independent test results of Thermal Grizzly's contact frame for Intel's LGA1700 socket show that using the simple device can reduce the temperature of Intel's overclocked Core i9-12900K processor by 10 degrees Celsius. In addition, the results emphasize that the device can significantly improve overclocking potential of Alder Lake processors

It turned out that the independent loading mechanism (ILM) of Intel's LGA1700 socket can deflect CPU's integrated heat spreader (IHS) and significantly reduce its ability to transfer heat from the die to a cooling system (thus reducing the CPU overclock potential). As a result, numerous methods and mods emerged to solve the issue and lower Alder Lake's temperature. Several companies have also released various tools to prevent Alder Lake's bending, but their efficiency has mixed feedback. Furthermore, Intel says that deflection does not cause any issues. In contrast, mods can void a warranty; this almost guarantees that large companies will not modify Intel's socket of its ILM mechanism. 

Thermal Grizzly and Roman 'der8auer' Hartung teamed up for the 12th Gen CPU Contact Frame (opens in new tab) product (TG-CF-i12G) that replaces Intel's recommended ILM with a milled piece of aluminum that presses the processor evenly on all sides and is thus promises to prevent bending. Our colleagues from Igor's Lab (opens in new tab) took the Contact Frame for a spin, and the results turned out to be quite inspiring.   

Thermal Grizzly's Contact Frame for LGA1700 CPUs can reduce the temperature of Intel's Core i9-12900K CPU with P-cores operating at 5.0 GHz, deactivated E-cores, and DDR5-7000 memory from 70.48 degrees Celsius to 60.29 degrees Celsius, or by 10.19 degrees Celsius in Prime95 stress test with Small FFT. In addition, the testers used Alphacool's XPX Aurora all-in-one liquid cooling system. 

By contrast, 1-mm washers dropped the temperature by 5.40 degrees Celsius, and Alphacool's backplate lowered the temperature by 5.11 degrees Celsius. In contrast, the contact frame and the backplate reduced temperatures by 6.34 degrees Celsius. As a result, thermal Grizzly's 12th Gen CPU Contact Frame works more efficiently alone than in combination with a custom backplate. 

But Thermal Grizzly's 12th Gen CPU Contact Frame is not cheap. It costs €39.90 in Germany ($36 without VAT), so everyone will have to decide whether a 10 degrees Celsius difference in temperatures is worth this price.

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    But Thermal Grizzly's 12th Gen CPU Contact Frame is not cheap. It costs €39.90 in Germany ($36 without VAT), so everyone will have to decide whether a 10 degrees Celsius difference in temperatures is worth this price.

    And the EU should start price gouging investigations...tomorrow?
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    And the EU should start price gouging investigations...tomorrow?
    I think there are bigger fish to fry than going after a product that maybe a handful of people would actually buy.
    Reply
  • darknate
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    And the EU should start price gouging investigations...tomorrow?
    You would have to justify why you require it. If you don't, then it's not price gouging.
    Also, I'm pretty sure you have zero clue the amount it costs to pay for the aluminum and the time to have it machined and then made into a finished product.
    Reply
  • Why_Me
    cogCj3MFOmkView: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cogCj3MFOmk
    Reply
  • King_V
    So, is Intel going to insist that using this ALSO voids your warranty?
    Reply
  • Tom Sunday
    Why_Me said:
    cogCj3MFOmk

    Looks to me like a lot of marketers or resellers wanting to again making a quick profit! A cool $36 can significantly improve ones overclocking temps? And you so rightfully mentioned Thermalright already a month ago quickly jumped on a similar bandwagon with their own solution. In my humble opinion to essentially pay $40 for a sliver of machined aluminum, which once set-up, can be mass reproduced and as such is gauging the consumers. I was also surprised to see that 'derBauer' from Germany teamed up for the scheme thus prostituting his good name. I would have loved to see Intel stepping-up to the bar (already many months ago) with a special CPU software or BIOS upgrade achieving much needed and improved cooling results. Just perhaps we will see major cooling enhancements in their upcoming new CPU generation only a few months away? And Intel using this temperature improvement as a major marketing tool in order to entice already existing Alder Lake owners in considering upgrading. Never a dull moment!
    Reply
  • jtcmedia
    Of course, it's out of stock everywhere
    Reply
  • rmzalbar
    "Price gouging?" For a totally optional thing you've been doing fine without? Are you serious with this whining? Do you really expect germany to compete with china prices anyway? Yes we must call the lawmakers I'm sure they will get right on this emergency.
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    King_V said:
    So, is Intel going to insist that using this ALSO voids your warranty?
    It changes the amount of pressure between the pins and the CPU and intel can't guarantee that everything will keep running fine, so they can't warrantee it.

    On the other hand, if you send in a CPU by itself how are they going to tell, other than by the CPU testing out fine.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    King_V said:
    So, is Intel going to insist that using this ALSO voids your warranty?
    Of course, because you're doing something to the CPU outside of what the manufacturer specified. Heck, AMD won't honor your warranty if you used PBO (but how they'll prove that is up in the air). And at some point, both companies wouldn't honor your warranty if you used an aftermarket cooler (which again, good look to them proving that).
    Reply