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GETIHU PB-01 Power Bank Tear-Down

Today’s Sacrificial Lamb

Over the past year, I have torn open SilverStone’s PB06 and QQC’s Q-Swap. So, when I came across GETIHU’s 10Ah, I bought it on a whim, if only to see how a $16 power bank fares against more expensive competitors in a comparable capacity class.

The GETIHU power bank comes in the form of a 153mm-long, 76mm-wide, and 10mm-thick elongated "D" extruded aluminum body. It weighs in at 200g and features powder-coated paint to give it some grit for grip. Is this power bank intended to stand on the concave edge of its D-shell? Assuming it is, then the brand label was printed upside-down. If it isn’t, then the sharp corners and mild edges are unnecessary liabilities. I can only wonder why GETIHU didn’t go with the same comfortable five-millimeter radius on both edges. Either way, oops!


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Box

To nobody's surprise, the inexpensive PB-01 ships in a modest cardboard box with monochrome print. Since these get distributed primarily via sites like Amazon, where marketing’s role is complete before hardware leaves the warehouse, there isn’t much of a point in wasting budget on full-color packaging meant to grab your attention on retail shelves.


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Packaging

Simplicity continues within. The whole box, including the compartment-dividing tray, is made from one piece of cardboard, cut and folded cleverly.

Due to how much the switch sticks out, the tray features a matching notch to accommodate it along the left edge. From what I have been told by GETIHU, many customers complained about accidentally activating the PB-01. As a result, newer variants are apparently equipped with stubbier switches.


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Black Or White

While I don't care about cable color all that much, I still find it funny when companies mismatch their kit. GETIHU includes a 27cm white A-to-micro-B cable to go with its black power bank.

Since such a short cable is rarely sufficient to reach wall adapters, even under favorable conditions like the kitchen counter, you’ll likely find yourself using some other cable to charge the PB-01 (unless you happen to have a desktop charger or hub).


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Let There Be Light

My box also included an unexpected LED light on a flexible stem, which looks nearly identical to the one I bought in a $6 six-pack. Aside from the ‘G’ silk-screened on GETIHU's lamp, the other notable difference is that my generic light has a metallized plastic piece in the rear slot, while GETIHU’s has the same diffuse white plastic on both sides.

Both versions provide more usable and uniform light than the built-in LED. If you own something similar, but crave increased brightness, removing the diffuser triples output. Be forewarned, though: the blindingly bright dots will make you see spots for several minutes if you accidentally look at them for more than a few seconds.


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Lighting Up

How do the light outputs compare? To the left, we have the power bank’s built-in LED, which produces a bright spot with a halo way out of the frame. In the middle, we have the gift lamp with its diffuser lens installed illuminating the wall with dim, yet usable light. The right is also GETIHU’s lamp, this time with its front diffuser taken off, making it many times brighter. If you are wondering why the back is so much brighter with the diffuser installed, that’s simply from light getting internally reflected.

If you like using USB LEDs a lot, you may want to look elsewhere for your lighting needs. GETIHU’s gift is about as bright at 230mA with its diffuser off as my generic USB lamps are at 200mA with their diffusers still attached.

All three photos were taken at 640 ISO, 1/13” shutter, and F/3.5 aperture.


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(Re-)Stating The Obvious

What information do you get in GETIHU’s little single-sided manual? The first fold after the cover goes over the power bank’s interface, which is largely self-explanatory. The second page discusses the charging process and package contents; this is where I learned that the light is a "gift." The third fold calls out warnings and specifications, while the final fold contains warranty information. Of these, only the packing list and warranty information seem of any real use. The rest should be obvious to people with common sense.


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The Dimensional Challenge

The PB-01 is 10% lighter and 27% smaller than QQC’s modular battery approach. SilverStone’s PB06, on the other hand, is in a league of its own at three times the thickness and 62% heavier weight courtesy of the heavy gauge construction necessary for its jump-starting capability.

All else being equal, which one of the three would I carry around on an everyday basis? The PB06 is clearly too big to casually tote around. Between GETIHU’s built-in extras and extruded aluminum body, and QQC’s more compact footprint, I’d call it a tie.


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Here Come The Specs Again

As is common with power-related products, specifications, certification marks, and some of the warnings mentioned in the manual are also repeated somewhere on the device itself. Unsurprisingly, the last line here tells us that GETIHU’s power bank is manufactured in China.

Am I the only one who thinks it would have been neat to print the manual's most essential parts on there using discreet gray ink instead of throwing in the folded sheet?


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Redundant Redundancy

In case you didn’t read the manual or the reasonably large print on the back side, certifications and some of the basic specs are also repeated on the end cap’s sticker.

I would have expected the sticker to say “GETIHU” instead of “POWER.” I suspect the company simply went with its power bank ODM’s sticker instead of paying extra for a custom one.


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The Business End

GETIHU’s PB-01 features two output ports, a switch that turns the outputs on with a single press or toggles the LED lamp with double-presses, the LED lamp itself, and four tiny charge level indicator LEDs along the top edge.

If you remember my automotive USB power adapter round-up from 2016, you may suspect that both ports here are simply hooked up in parallel, sharing whatever output current capacity the power bank offers, with the only difference between them being battery charging resistors on the otherwise unused data lines.


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  • dudmont
    Interesting. Doubt the OEM ever expected someone to get quite so "intimate" with their product. It's articles like this that keeps OEMs vaguely honest in this day and age. Who needs UL when when Toms will give a product a full rectal?
    Reply
  • Daniel Sauvageau
    20716732 said:
    Who needs UL when when Toms will give a product a full rectal?
    :)

    Just keep in mind that UL, CSA, VDE, etc. mainly deal with electrical, fire and mechanical safety issues, not misleading or fraudulent marketing or performance. Fraudulent claims is something for the consumer protection, advertising standards and other similar agencies to deal with. You could get the most blatant PoS falsely advertised gizmo you can conceive of UL-listed as long as it passes safety checks for whatever applicable UL categories you apply for. If your gizmo has power outlets on it, you can probably get it UL-listed for UL 1363 (relocatable power tap) regardless of how unsafe unrelated additional functions might be as the UL listing pertains exclusively to the power bar function and related aspects of the product. Secondary features such as built-in USB ports would be covered separately under something like UL/CSA 60950 which is specifically about information technology equipment safety.
    Reply
  • BaRoMeTrIc
    This is the problem with open trade. These products get into the U.S. from China via amazon, newegg, ebay... They slap fake UL stickers on there, fake specs. No one checks them out or holds them accountable. We need better regulation.
    Reply
  • dudmont
    20717076 said:
    This is the problem with open trade. These products get into the U.S. from China via amazon, newegg, ebay... They slap fake UL stickers on there, fake specs. No one checks them out or holds them accountable. We need better regulation.

    Do you think someone working for uncle Sam would have done what Sauvageau did(and the answer is no, because someone from the electronics industry is already offering any competent engineer from Gov. who would checking stuff like this a job)? Call me a strong skeptic. Government, business, my neighbors, everyone but my own flesh and blood is to be trusted, but verified(and possibly not even trusted in the least).
    Reply
  • edlivian
    any brands to recommend here, or just stick with Anker
    Reply
  • Daniel Sauvageau
    20722606 said:
    any brands to recommend here, or just stick with Anker
    I haven't had one of those yet, so no first-hand comment on that but one of my friends who owns a few Anker accessories is eagerly waiting for me to get around to tearing into one and see if I'll find anything that might shake his confidence in the brand.

    Between power banks I've shown here so far though, the SilverStone PB01's track record for poorly soldered micro-B ports (two out of three, though I haven't opened the third one to check, only saying so because it hasn't failed me yet, unlike the 2nd unit whose micro-B was practically DOA) is very unfortunate and although the Q-Swap is neatly built, it is expensive compared to countless other 10Ah-class alternatives. The GETIHU may have been ok-ish for the price had it been advertised at its actual 8Ah.
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    Im using an Anker powercore 10k and Im liking it, but it sure would be great to see something this in depth on it.
    Reply
  • icycool_q1
    I love reading your tear-downs.
    These companies should start paying you to get their products right!
    Reply
  • test_purch1
    Test Automation comment 1519394378443
    Reply