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AMD Ryzen 7 5700G: Zen 3 May Finally Be Coming To Desktop APUs

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G
AMD Ryzen 7 5700G (Image credit: Weixin)

IVA Computer Hardware Group (via Twitter user HXL) is reportedly selling an engineering sample of AMD's forthcoming Zen 3 (Cezanne) APUs on Weixin. The seller isn't absolutely certain of the exact model, but it could be the Ryzen 7 5700G or Ryzen 7 5750G.

A lot of excitement surrounded AMD's Ryzen 4000 (Renoir) pre-launch as the Zen 2 chips would usher in eight cores to the APU segment. However, the chipmaker broke many hearts when it decided to restrict the sales to OEMs. While you could still pick up a Ryzen 4000 chip on the black market, desktop Renoir pretty much ended up in disappointment. With Ryzen 5000 (Cezanne), AMD might take a different course because, well, it's Zen 3 in the conversation here.

Ryzen 5000 (or Cezanne as many call it) will come wielding Zen 3 cores, the same ones that have debuted on the Ryzen 5000 (Vermeer) desktop parts. The discrepancy between AMD's processors and APUs has been around for a while now. It appears that the chipmaker may finally consolidate both product lines under the same branding to avoid any confusion.

While there is a considerable improvement on the processing side, Ryzen 5000 is rumored to retain the Vega graphics engine. A mobile Ryzen 5000 sample from last year alluded to the continued utilization of Vega iGPU, and if accurate, the design should shift over to the desktop variants as well.

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Specifications

ProcessorCores / ThreadsBase / Boost Clocks (GHz)L2 Cache (MB)L3 Cache (MB)TDP (W)
Ryzen 7 5700G8 / 16? / 4.441665
Ryzen 7 4700G8 / 163.6 / 4.44865
Ryzen 7 3700X8 / 163.6 / 4.443265

The Ryzen 7 5700G (100-000000263-30) reportedly comes equipped with eight cores and 16 threads. This was expected since the APU lineup recently got upgraded to eight cores, so it'll be a few more generations before an AMD APU breaks the octa-core threshold. Once again, the Ryzen 7 5700G appears to have 4MB of L2 cache but seemingly sports 16MB of L3 cache (twice that of the Ryzen 4000).

According to the CPU-Z screenshot, the Ryzen 7 5700G clocked up to 4.4GHz (4,441MHz), which we suspect is the boost clock speed. Now, you may think that sounds underwhelming since the Ryzen 7 4700G already boosts up to 4.4 GHz. However, we shouldn't overlook the fact that the Ryzen 7 5700G is armed with Zen 3, which has very powerful IPC (instruction per cycle) enhancements.

The seller also claimed that he had no problems overclocking the Ryzen 7 5700G to 4.7 GHz with a 1.468V Vcore. However, he didn't provide any graphical benchmarks since the Ryzen 5000 APUs are unreleased hardware and lack a proper display driver.

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AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G (Image credit: Weixin)
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AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G (Image credit: Weixin)
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AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G (Image credit: Weixin)

At stock, the Ryzen 7 5700G scored 613.8 points in the CPU-Z single-thread test and 6,296.2 points in the multi-thread test. When overclocked to 4.7 GHz, the scores increased to 647.4 points and 6,960 points, respectively. To be clear, the merchant used DDR4-3000 memory to perform the tests, so the Ryzen 7 5700G's performance could certainly improve with faster memory.

The Ryzen 7 3700X is a fitting comparison since it's 65W, and the Ryzen 7 5700G, like AMD's other APUs, will likely be limited to the same TDP as well. The Ryzen 7 3700X puts up single-and multi-thread scores of 511 points and 5,433 points, respectively. Regarding single-thread workloads, the Ryzen 5 5700G delivered up to 20.1% higher performance than the Ryzen 7 3700X at stock and up to 26.7% when overclocked. For multi-core, we're looking at margins up to 15.9% at stock and 28.1% with a 4.7 GHz overclock.

It's very normal to find unreleased hardware for sale in the Chinese market, especially the engineering samples. For the Ryzen 7 5700G, the seller asks for 1,888 yuan (~$291.56), which is bulk pricing. While the listing seems unimportant, it does tell us that Ryzen 5000 has been out in the wild for quite some time, so it shouldn't surprise us if AMD suddenly drops a bomb on us at, say, CES 2021 next week.           

  • Loadedaxe
    The need to get off Vega graphics for the apus, its getting rather old and outdated.
    Reply
  • deksman
    Loadedaxe said:
    The need to get off Vega graphics for the apus, its getting rather old and outdated.

    To be fair, AMD upgraded Vega for Zen 2 CPU's and it ended up being on par with Navi performance and efficiency-wise.
    However, I do agree that with RDNA 2, AMD is better off to switch over to that for the iGP... still, I think that because of its later introduction, I think they opted to stick with enhanced Vega instead for Zen 3.
    I think we will see RDNA 2 (or 3) based APU's starting with Zen 4.
    Reply
  • mattkiss
    deksman said:
    To be fair, AMD upgraded Vega for Zen 2 CPU's and it ended up being on par with Navi performance and efficiency-wise.

    What do you mean by this?
    Reply
  • Giroro
    AMD already has an 8 core Zen 3 APU with navi graphics. Multiple variants actually in the PS5 and Xbox XS.
    It seems like it would be a waste of engineering resources to go back and redesign their new mid/high end APU with ultra-low-end Vega graphics.
    And it would be especially a bummer when it could easily be another year for mainstream priced current-gen GPUs to launch and actually become available.

    With availability and pricing the way it is, AMD has a real opportunity to totally dominate low to midrange gaming this year if they can get the graphics performance high enough to tide people over until an upgrade path to a new $150 - $300 GPU ... Exists.
    Plus the AMD executive who kept rebadging GCN cards for like 8 years got poached by Intel (weirdly not for their CPUs) so there is hope that AMD's GPU team might actually start making smart decisions again.
    Reply
  • mitch074
    Vega is not bad as an iGPU - it sucked when being clocked up, but considering that the main limit of an iGPU is shared RAM, sticking with it may be needed for price and performance. RDNA2 needs a big cache to work properly, which is OK when you have as much room on the die as you need. Here though, not so much.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    Yep Vega is very good apu gpu!
    Anything better would make apus too expensive. Most people look for sub $100 apus and you have to cut even Vega down a lot to get the price there!
    Something as powerfull as PS5 would cost $1500 the cpu alone... nobody woul buy those...
    Reply
  • usiname
    hannibal said:
    Yep Vega is very good apu gpu!
    Anything better would make apus too expensive. Most people look for sub $100 apus and you have to cut even Vega down a lot to get the price there!
    Something as powerfull as PS5 would cost $1500 the cpu alone... nobody woul buy those...
    $1500? The whole xbox series x is $499 and PS5 399$. How only cpu can cost more than this, by more I mean 4x the price of PS5?
    Reply
  • hannibal
    Consoles Are sold at lost. Normal pc hardware They want to get Profit. Amd wants to have 50% Profit. Above that expensive to move, storage. Then middle hands want to get Profit. So the total price can be easily 3 to 4 times of the production costs...
    Ofcourse my estimation was pure ques, but I Expect that it can be even too Little...
    Reply
  • wtfmang
    yeah, $1500 Monopoly dollars
    Reply
  • mdd1963
    If it is coming with the same (rather pathetic) sub-GT1030-level performing graphics of the 4000-series APUs, I am not holding out much hope for folks fantasizing about doing any real gaming at 1080P without need for a discrete GPU...(perhaps in 3 more years an APU can equal a GTX1050's performance...(although a GTX1060 would be preferable!)

    (Might do OK for folks who do not really need a GPU, however....unless it is priced with more than a $100 of what a no-integrated-graphics equivalent CPU costs, I'd suspect only the misinformed would buy it)
    Reply