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AMD Ryzen 7 5800X Emerges As A Serious Rival For The Intel Core i9-10900K

AMD Ryzen Desktop Processor
AMD Ryzen Desktop Processor (Image credit: AMD)
AMD Ryzen Desktop Processor (Image credit: AMD)

Hot on the heels of the Ryzen 7 5800U, chip detective @TUM_APISAK has unearthed multiple Ashes of the Singularity submissions of yet another AMD unannounced processor. On this occasion, the Ryzen 7 5800X emerged to give the Intel Core i9-10900K a run for its money.

The Ryzen 7 5800X's lineage is currently a mystery to be solved. On one end, the chip could belong to AMD's upcoming Zen 3 (codename Vermeer) family, which the chipmaker will present on October 8. If that's the case, it would appear that AMD might finally integrate both processors and APUs under the same series. The chipmaker's mainstream processors and APUs are currently sporting the Ryzen 3000 and Ryzen 4000 monikers. The current mismatch lends to confusion, especially for the uninitiated who don't follow AMD's work.

Just a small disclaimer, Ashes of the Singularity is one of the easiest benchmark to spoof. Therefore, we recommend you approach the Ryzen 7 5800X results with a touch of salt. But given the timing of the submission, it's likely a Zen 3 chip.

Ryzen 7 5800X vs. Core i9-10900K (Image credit: TUM_APISAK/Twitter)

According to the benchmark, the Ryzen 7 5800X comes with an eight-core, 16-thread configuration, which means that it's the potential successor to the existing Ryzen 7 3800X. Besides, the core count, the benchmark doesn't reveal the chip's other specifications. 

The Ryzen 7 5800X is apparently an octa-core part so its nearest rival should be the Core i7-10700K. However, TUM_APISAK pitched it against a Core i9-10900K result that reportedly is from the same user who tested the AMD chip. Both test systems employed the same GeForce RTX 2080 graphics card with the only difference being the amount of memory between the two configurations. The user appeared to have used the Crazy 4K preset for testing.

Core i9-10900KRyzen 7 5800XPerformance Difference
Averages114.8133.616.4%
Normal Batch136.3166.622.2%
Medium Batch118.6135.314.1%
Heavy Batch96.5110.314.3%

Overall, the Ryzen 7 5800X delivered up to 16.% higher performance than the Core i9-10900K in Ashes of the Singularity. It's a good outcome for AMD as the Ryzen 7 5800X seemingly was at a two-core disadvantage. It's pertinent to note that the user tested both chips under the DirectX 12 API, which takes advantages of more cores. However, clock speeds are equally important. 

The Core i9-10900K has a 3.7 GHz base clock and 5.3 GHz boost clock. Although we don't know the clock speeds for the Ryzen 7 5800X, previous rumors suggest that AMD was closing in to 5 GHz on some early engineering Zen 3 samples. That in combination with the the improvements that the Zen 3 microarchitecture brings and TSMC's 7nm FinFET process node will make Vemeer a very formidable competitor.

The Zen 3 keynote will take place on October 8 at 10am PT. AMD didn't disappoint with Zen 2, and from what has been leaked so far, Zen 3 will likely blow us out of our seats.

  • Endymio
    >> "The chipmaker's mainstream processors and APUs are currently sporting the Ryzen 3000 and Ryzen 4000 monikers. The current mismatch lends to confusion, especially for the uninitiated ..."
    The "uninitiated" don't care what generation a processor belongs to, just what the overall performance will be.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    The uninitiated want the name brand which is Intel.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    As someone else once said "More Tums for Intel"
    Reply
  • GeekyOne
    So are they going to release 5000G APUs? I still can't get a 4800G and am waiting for a fast APU to save close to $200 (for a discrete GPU I don't need) since I'm not a gamer.
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    Endymio said:
    >> "The chipmaker's mainstream processors and APUs are currently sporting the Ryzen 3000 and Ryzen 4000 monikers. The current mismatch lends to confusion, especially for the uninitiated ..."
    The "uninitiated" don't care what generation a processor belongs to, just what the overall performance will be.
    are you kidding or are you oblivious? the uninitiated will just buy whatever is popular and has the highest number in the product name.

    that's why intel purposely makes their nomenclature confusing. they can upsell garbage.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    GeekyOne said:
    So are they going to release 5000G APUs? I still can't get a 4800G and am waiting for a fast APU to save close to $200 (for a discrete GPU I don't need) since I'm not a gamer.

    That is the Main point of being worried. I am sure that Zen3 is gonna be fast. But can TSMC produce enough of those... I doupt very much. There is huge shortage of 4000 series mobile chips and 4000 series apus for AIB parners.
    The AMD demand and TSMC production capasity Are in huge imbalance at this moment and very good Zen3 does not improve that situation... Where the h*** amd manage to get production capasity to GPUs in this situation, where They don`t even have enough to their cpus.

    That is interesting situation. What prices retailers will put on those if They Are rare as a gold?
    Reply
  • mdd1963
    Interesting results...!

    (I look forward to seeing a variety of popular games' results, and not potentially just a cherry picked sample)

    If this alleged 5800X can even match the 10700K in most games, and at even a $50-$100 savings, it will be the first time in a VERY long time (the early Pentium IV days) that AMD has outperformed Intel in gaming. Having long since been curb-stomped in Cinebench, to then have AMD match/exceed the 10900K's gaming performance ,a nd with two fewer cores, would be....well.... brutal for Intel...
    Reply
  • Endymio
    GeekyOne said:
    So are they going to release 5000G APUs? I still can't get a 4800G and am waiting for a fast APU to save close to $200 (for a discrete GPU I don't need)
    If you don't need 3D graphics, there are plenty of discrete graphics cards in the $25-$75 range, with more than enough performance to handle 2D tasks. For instance:

    EVGA GT710
    eklipz330 said:
    are you kidding or are you oblivious? the uninitiated will just buy whatever is popular and has the highest number in the product name. that's why intel purposely makes their nomenclature confusing. they can upsell garbage.
    I've had enough of argumentative obstreperous fanboys today. So I'll simply agree: every Intel chip ever made is utter garbage, and anyone who ever bought one is an unenlightened savage, incapable of performing even the most basic of daily tasks without constant supervision.
    Reply
  • Endymio
    hannibal said:
    That is the Main point of being worried. I am sure that Zen3 is gonna be fast. But can TSMC produce enough of those... I doupt very much. There is huge shortage of 4000 series mobile chips and 4000 series apus for AIB parners.
    Even many of the 3000 series have escalated rapidly in price, particularly on the lower end. The 3600, for instance, has risen from $155 to $205, in little over a month.
    Reply
  • ScrewySqrl
    Endymio said:
    Even many of the 3000 series have escalated rapidly in price, particularly on the lower end. The 3600, for instance, has risen from $155 to $205, in little over a month.

    that's more COVID causing shortages in the supply chain, not TSMC specifically. the same problem has hit Memory, GPUs, Power Supplies, SSDs amd Hard Drives, even Cases
    Reply