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EKWB Makes Revo Reservoirs Even Shinier With Borosilicate Glass

Everybody knows that EKWB makes some really fancy water cooling gear, but sometimes, just sometimes, you want even more high-quality materials. For example, wouldn’t it be great if EKWB used glass instead of acrylic? Well, today, it is doing just that for two of its reservoirs.

The reservoirs in question are the EK-XRes Revo D5 100 and 140. The change is simple: Instead of using an acrylic cylinder, EKWB is using a cylinder made of borosilicate glass.

However, the glass doesn’t have any threading, and therefore it doesn’t screw into the base the way the acrylic unit does. Instead, there is a metal tube going through the center of the reservoir that keeps it all together. At the bottom, the tube has holes through which the fluid is pulled into the pump. Due to this design, parts from the acrylic version are not compatible with the glass version.

Throughout the unit, EKWB uses G1/4” threading for fittings, which makes it compatible with most water cooling loops. The pump in the units is a Laing D5 unit with PWM support.

Pricing sits at $154.99 for the 100 mm tall variant, while the EK-XRes 140 Revo D5 PWM Glass will cost three dollars more at $157.99. Both are available for purchase directly from EKWB through its webshop.

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  • falchard
    Might be OK inside a case, but I would fear the glass shattering. I have borosilica mugs, and they shatter pretty easily.
    Reply
  • atheus
    I like to put sticks of dynamite in my case too, because it looks awesome through the window.
    Reply
  • Fates_Demise
    ah, I see atheus... you must be one of those people that roll their computer down the stairs for fun... I mean NO WAY does a computer usually sit still in one place in a non extreme impact environment.

    The glass tubes work perfectly fine, my friend has a similar reservoir in his case from a diff brand and they look amazing. 0 Issues
    Reply
  • atheus
    17428116 said:
    ah, I see atheus... you must be one of those people that roll their computer down the stairs for fun... I mean NO WAY does a computer usually sit still in one place in a non extreme impact environment.

    The glass tubes work perfectly fine, my friend has a similar reservoir in his case from a diff brand and they look amazing. 0 Issues

    Just a light-hearted joke. Yes, though I do prefer the peace of mind of the zero risk involved with air cooling, I'm sure almost nobody will accidentally shatter that glass and splash water all over the inside of their case.

    It's just funny to see the stakes raised a little bit. It'd be like reading that using gasoline instead of water results in better cooling, or that you can just put a thick conformal coating over the assembled system and cool it by spraying a garden hose directly at the CPU socket and letting it drizzle onto your graphics cards. At what point does the risk become too great? The line will be different for everyone.
    Reply
  • e36_Jeff
    Just a light-hearted joke. Yes, though I do prefer the peace of mind of the zero risk involved with air cooling, I'm sure almost nobody will accidentally shatter that glass and splash water all over the inside of their case.

    It's just funny to see the stakes raised a little bit. It'd be like reading that using gasoline instead of water results in better cooling, or that you can just put a thick conformal coating over the assembled system and cool it by spraying a garden hose directly at the CPU socket and letting it drizzle onto your graphics cards. At what point does the risk become too great? The line will be different for everyone.

    Honestly, I feel like any impact bad enough to break the reservoir is going to do so much damage to the rest of your PC that leaking water will be a secondary concern.
    Reply
  • mwryder55
    I don't see any reliabliltiy problems in using glass over plastic for the reservoir. There is probably still a greater chance of a leak from a bad joint or tube getting punctured then the reservoir taking a hard enough hit to break it.
    The liquid CPU cooling system on my pre-built computer failed after about a year when one of the cooling hoses developed a hole from rubbing on one of the case fans. It sprayed coolant all over the inside of the computer but did no other damage. I just had to clean everything up and replace the coolant system.
    Reply
  • JackNaylorPE
    Great move ..... I was extremely disappointed that I couldn't fit a borosilicate res in my build cause the smalles one available at the time was 70mm in diameter and a EK 60mm only cleared the GFX card water blocks by 2mm, so I was 3mm short. Of course, I'm assuming that EQ kept their standard 60mm dimensions.

    Also nice to see a top w/ three ports. Single port tops are kinda useless when feeding the res fro the top w/ a fill tube as there's no bleed port.
    Reply
  • durahl
    Here's a picture of my 2y old System with an AquaComputer Aqualis 770ml Borosilicate Reservoir on top of a D5 Pump which EKWB now has basically copied.
    I'm not saying it being impossible to have it shatter but the way I see it in order for it to actually do you'd need such an impact on the outside of the case for it to affect the Reservoir on the inside you'll most likely have other issues to cope with than a leaking Reservoir.
    Reply