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Intel Comet Lake-S Arrives: More Cores, Higher Boosts and Power Draw, but Better Pricing

Full Intel 10th-Gen Comet Lake-S Slide Deck 

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Here's Intel's full slide deck for the Comet Lake-S Launch. However, as with any vendor-provided benchmarks, take all performance claims with a grain of salt and be sure to peruse the footnotes for relevant information. 

For instance, in the first row of results on the "Elite real-world performance for gaming" slide, Intel claims anywhere from a 10% to 33% increase in fps and an 18% improvement in 4K video editing, but the performance slide doesn't include the most important information—like the processors tested. Intel generated these results by comparing the 10-core 20-thread Core i9-10900K to the previous-gen eight-core 16-thread 9900K, which isn't an apples-to-apples comparison. It's also noteworthy that these gains occur in games optimized for Intel's architectures through partnerships with game developers. 

Intel's second row of test results show massive gains against a three-year-old PC, in this case one armed with a Core i7-7700K. 

Intel Comet Lake Pentium Gold 

ModelMSRPCores / ThreadsBase / Boost GHzL3 CacheTDPPCIeMemory
Pentium Gold G6600$862 / 44.245816 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Pentium Gold G5600$822 / 43.945416 Gen3Dual DDR4-2400
Pentium Gold G6500$752 / 44.145816 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Pentium Gold G6400$642 / 44.045816 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Pentium Gold G5400 $642 / 43.745816 Gen3Dual DDR4-2400
Celeron G5920$522 / 23.525816 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Celeron G5900$422 / 23.425816 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666

Intel also refreshed its Pentium Gold and Celeron lineups. The former series often makes a good pairing with super low-end gaming builds, but scoring the chips anywhere near recommended pricing has always been a challenge. 

The new Pentium Gold models come with faster DDR4-2666 memory support and a 300 MHz increase to the base clock (there is no boost), but otherwise are similar to their predecessors. This end of the market is, by Intel's own admission, among its lower priorities. As such, it isn't surprising to see the relatively lackluster refresh. 

Intel Comet Lake T-Series 

ModelMSRPCores / ThreadsBase / Boost GHzL3 CacheTDPPCIeMemory
Core i9-10900T$43910 / 201.9 / 4.6203516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2933
Core i7-10700T$3258 / 162.0 / 4.5163516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2933
Core i5-10600T$2136 / 122.4 / 4.0123516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Core i5-10500T$1926 / 122.3 / 3.8123516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Core i5-10400T$1826 / 122.0 / 3.6123516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Core i3-10300T$1434 / 83.0 / 3.983516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Core i3-10100T$1224 / 83.0 / 3.883516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Pentium Gold G6500T$752 / 43.543516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Pentium Gold G6400T$642 / 43.443516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666
Celeron G5900T$422 / 23.223516 Gen3Dual DDR4-2666

Intel's T-series processors sacrifice clock speeds in the name of slotting into a lower power envelope that often offers a superior level of efficiency. These chips are especially attractive to small form factor builders. There's a low power part to match every full-powered non-K part in Intel's Comet Lake stack, so options abound. 

Paul Alcorn

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.