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Intel Tiger Lake SuperFin-ishes AMD Ryzen 4000 In Latest Benchmarks

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UPDATE: Intel has now provided the full official specs and list of Tiger Lake chips, which you can see in our Intel Launches Tiger Lake: Up to 4.8 GHz, LPDDR4 Memory, Iris Xe Graphics up to 1.35 GHz article.  

Original Article:

Shortly after leaking several Tiger Lake promotional videos, Twitter user WalkingCat is making headlines again. This time, the leaker has shared two new videos where the 10nm SuperFin-powered Core i7-1185G7 goes up against AMD's Ryzen 7 4800U in several scenarios. The videos appear to be conducted by Intel, and the exact conditions of the test environment and the specifications of the two systems are unknown. For now, we recommend you exercise a bit of caution with the results and wait for our testing before you make a choice of which is the Best CPU

Intel Core i7-1185G7 vs. AMD Ryzen 7 4800U

The first video has the Core i7-1185G7 facing the Ryzen 7 4800U in multiple games. Apparently, Intel configured the Core i7-1185G7 to 28W (PL1), while the Ryzen 7 4800U was running on Extreme Performance Mode. We've seen the Extreme Performance Mode feature before in a Lenovo laptops before. The functionality essentially unlocks a higher thermal limit for the processor. Giving Intel the benefit of the doubt, the Ryzen 7 4800U in the chipmaker's comparison should have had a 25W ceiling.

The results showed the Core i7-1185G7 surpassing the Ryzen 7 4800U in iGPU gaming, which is something we're not accustomed to see from Intel. Back in June, Intel employee Ryan Shrout demoed a Tiger Lake-powered laptop running Battlefield V on solely integrated graphics. These latest benchmarks seemingly confirms Xe LP's graphical prowess.

The general gist of the second video is that the Core i7-1185G7 practically outperformed the Ryzen 7 4800U in all the tasks that Intel threw at it. The workloads included video edition, 4K video playback, export times, among others. According to the videos, the margins were pretty substantial – the Tiger Lake chip completed certain activities up to twice as fast.

To put things into context, the Ryzen 7 4800U (codename Renoir) is an eight-core, 16-thread processor with a 8MB L3 cache. The Zen 2 APU, which is a product of TSMC's 7nm FinFET manufacturing process, runs with a 1.8 GHz base clock and 4.2 GHz boost clock. On the graphics side of things, the Ryzen 7 4800U sports eight Vega Compute Units (CUs) at 1,750 MHz. The Ryzen 7 4800U comes with a cTDP (configurable thermal desin power) rating that spans between 10W and 25W.

The Core i7-1185G7 (codename Tiger Lake) is unreleased, however, the processor has surfaced multiple times over the past months. Thus far, we know that the Core i7-1185G7 has a four-core, eight-thread configuration that's complemented with 12MB of L3 cache. The quad-core chip comes out of Intel's 10nm SuperFin furnace and packs Willow Cove cores and Xe LP graphics. The most recent Geekbench 5 submission detected the Core i7-1185G7 with a 3 GHz base clock and 4.8 GHz boost clock. The processor's iGPU is reportedly comprised of 96 Execution Units (EUs) at 1,550 MHz. The cTDP for the Core i7-1185G7 ranges between 15W and 28W.

It's too early to proclaim Intel as the undisputed winner, though. As we've learned in the past, manufacturer benchmarks aren't exactly the most accurate. From what we've seen so far, Tiger Lake is absolutely a game changer. Don't forget to tune in tomorrow for the official launch.

  • RealBeast
    Good to see competition, but could someone tell Intel to simplify its model numbers. ;)
    Reply
  • RodroX
    Theres usually imposible to get a apple to apple comparisons in notebooks, and not knowing both systems configurations really sucks.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    RealBeast said:
    Good to see competition, but could someone tell Intel to simplify its model numbers. ;)
    The new-style model numbers for 10nm parts are simple enough: two numbers for generation, two numbers for models within that generation, 'G' to indicate that the chip has graphics and then numbers to indicate what IGP it has.

    Decoupling the CPU part of model numbers from the graphics part clears the way for scaling them independently later with 2.5D/FOVEROS.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    RodroX said:
    Theres usually imposible to get a apple to apple comparisons in notebooks, and not knowing both systems configurations really sucks.
    6x8SAAk_J4cView: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6x8SAAk_J4c

    zM86auSGb2MView: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zM86auSGb2M
    The closest you'll ever get in notebooks for 2x systems to be as identical as possible.
    Reply
  • RodroX
    I already saw both videos back when first posted.

    We will see what happend when this new intel cpu are available to reviewers (inside a consumer/gaming/business laptop)
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    In ST with a clock advantage and possibly faster memory I can see the CPU outperforming Zen. As for some of the tasks I can only guess that it might be DL Boost, the AI learning they have on CL chips, or possibly something similar to QuickSync that uses the iGPU when performing these tasks to speed up performance. Otherwise I can't see, if the application is able to use multiple threads, 4 cores beating 8. And I highly doubt TL has 2x the performance per core of ICL.
    Reply
  • Avro Arrow
    jimmysmitty said:
    In ST with a clock advantage and possibly faster memory I can see the CPU outperforming Zen. As for some of the tasks I can only guess that it might be DL Boost, the AI learning they have on CL chips, or possibly something similar to QuickSync that uses the iGPU when performing these tasks to speed up performance. Otherwise I can't see, if the application is able to use multiple threads, 4 cores beating 8. And I highly doubt TL has 2x the performance per core of ICL.
    I agree 100%. Intel CPUs winning in Intel-conducted tests are not the least bit meaningful.
    Reply
  • escksu
    jimmysmitty said:
    In ST with a clock advantage and possibly faster memory I can see the CPU outperforming Zen. As for some of the tasks I can only guess that it might be DL Boost, the AI learning they have on CL chips, or possibly something similar to QuickSync that uses the iGPU when performing these tasks to speed up performance. Otherwise I can't see, if the application is able to use multiple threads, 4 cores beating 8. And I highly doubt TL has 2x the performance per core of ICL.

    Its entirely possible for 4 cores to beat 8. This is due to thermal and power throttling. Although Ryzen has 8 cores, its still limited by its 25W tdp.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    escksu said:
    Its entirely possible for 4 cores to beat 8. This is due to thermal and power throttling. Although Ryzen has 8 cores, its still limited by its 25W tdp.


    Yes but the TL chip is also limited to 28W so the odds of just 3W allowing that much performance advantage is slim. I wouldn;t be surprised if they don't have something that can use the iGPU. QuickSync took everyone by surprise.
    Reply
  • Chung Leong
    jimmysmitty said:
    Otherwise I can't see, if the application is able to use multiple threads, 4 cores beating 8. And I highly doubt TL has 2x the performance per core of ICL.

    I think 4 cores with support for transactional memory can easily beat 8 cores without it.
    Reply