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Windows 11 Rolls out to More Windows 10 PCs This Week

Windows 11
(Image credit: Microsoft)

Today, Microsoft announced the next phase of delivering Windows 11 to more customers as it embarks on the big transition away from Windows 10. When Microsoft launched Windows 11 earlier this month, the company focused on delivering the operating system to two specific groups. The first group was brand new PCs shipping with Windows 11 preinstalled. The second group included new Windows 10 PCs eligible to receive the Windows 11 upgrade from Microsoft.

Starting this week, the company is taking advantage of its “latest generation machine learning model” to “offer the upgrade to an expanded set of eligible devices.” Microsoft goes on to state, “We recommend that you upgrade your devices to Windows 11 to take advantage of the latest features and advanced protections from security threats.” 

Microsoft encourages everyone with PCs that meet the minimum system requirements for Windows 11 to upgrade ASAP to leverage all the latest features that it provides (including Android app support) and the latest security features. The enhanced security of Windows 11 is made possible by two of Microsoft’s most controversial requirements for installing the operating system: TPM 2.0 support and an 8th generation Intel Core/AMD Ryzen 2000 (or newer) processor.

If you haven’t already done so, you can use Microsoft’s PC Health Check app to see if your Windows 10 PC is eligible for the Windows 11 upgrade. If you haven’t already downloaded the tool, the chances are that it will be force-installed on your system shortly via the newly released KB5005463 update. If your PC passes muster, there’s a good chance that Microsoft will soon offer the Windows 11 upgrade for your system. 

“If you have an eligible device, open Windows Update Settings and select Check for updates,” Microsoft added. “Once the upgrade is ready for your device, you will see the option to download and install.”

Microsoft will continually tweak its machine learning model to deliver Windows 11 to even more Windows 10 PCs over the next few months. If everything goes according to schedule, Windows 11 will be offered to all eligible Windows 10 PCs by the first half of 2022.

And if you don’t want to wait around for Microsoft to deliver Windows 11 to you automatically, you can take matters into your own hands by upgrading using our handy how-to guide.

Brandon Hill

Brandon Hill is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware. He has written about PC and Mac tech since the late 1990s with bylines at AnandTech, DailyTech, and Hot Hardware. When he is not consuming copious amounts of tech news, he can be found enjoying the NC mountains or the beach with his wife and two sons.

  • svan71
    And it will no doubt roll off a bunch also, personally I hate it. Should have brought rounded edges to 10 along with the added features while allowing for a center dock option. Nothing special about 11 imho.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    And they can keep it. It took them over a year to get Windows 10 to a state where you didn't need to be wary of updates causing BSODs, bricked machines, or deleting files and uninstalling programs Microsoft doesn't think you should be using.

    And the awful reduced productivity UI just seals the deal to keep 11 away for as long as possible.
    Reply
  • vern72
    I'm intentionally turning off my firmware TPM so I won't be eligible.
    Reply
  • troger555
    What i do not like is the pressure. I have a 6900k 32gig mem 3060rtx no tpm2.0 and windows telling me under system update in red that i cannot upgrade to windows 11. So what microsoft, have 5 years to care about it so do not bother me with buying a new computer so you get a cut of the profit. I build my own regardles. What a racket. My system is plenty for 2k gaming for a good while , let alone general tasks.
    Reply
  • Dr3ams
    Had it installed, but I noticed the developers are still monkeying with the start menu and task bar. After a day I rolled my system back to Windows 10.
    Reply
  • pjmelect
    I think that the uptake of Windows 11 will be very low, so low in fact that it may cause Microsoft to rethink their stratagem.
    Reply
  • escksu
    I still see no reason to upgrade to windows 11 (or rather sidegrade). I am not even recommending my company to try anytime soon (will be on windows 10 for at least 3-4yrs).

    The biggest problem? Unknown issues. New OS will usually have new bugs and issues thats yet to be discovered, esp. security related issues. Cause more problems instead.

    Sometimes, new OS breaks things instead. Even patches do that frequently....lol...
    Reply
  • Sleepy_Hollowed
    If the TPM is going to be a dealbreaker going forward, and used for drm and “anti piracy” (tracking” I’m just going to politely skip windows overall.
    Reply
  • peachpuff
    vern72 said:
    I'm intentionally turning off my firmware TPM so I won't be eligible.
    Lol same 😂
    Reply
  • Nolonar
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    It took them over a year to get Windows 10 to a state where you didn't need to be wary of updates causing BSODs, bricked machines, or deleting files and uninstalling programs Microsoft doesn't think you should be using.
    With the way people kept praising Windows 10 as rock solid, I thought I was the only one who thought like that.
    Reply