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Silverstone Sugo 14 Review: 100% Practicality and Thermals

Does this ITX case know the answer to the ultimate question of life?

Silverstone Sugo 14
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

We are using the following system for today’s testing

CPUIntel Core i5-9600K
MotherboardASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming-ITX/ac
MemoryCorsair Vengeance LPX 3200 MHz, 16 GB (2x 8GB)
GraphicsNvidia GeForce RTX 2070 Super Founder’s Edition
CPU CoolingCorsair H100i Elite Capellix
StorageCorsair Force Series MP600 NVMe SSD, 500GB
Power SupplyPhanteks Amp 650

Step 1: Installing the PSU

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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

I decided to start this build by installing the power supply. At first I was a little puzzled about how I was supposed to slide it in, but I hadn’t removed the bottom panel. Here, a slot is present to slide the PSU into for very easy installation.

Our large Corsair HX750i wouldn’t fit in this low-height case, but we have a standard ATX form factor PSU from Phanteks available that we used.

Step 2: Motherboard

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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The motherboard dropped right into place after this without any fuss.

Step 3: Cable Management

Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

I decided that although the system isn’t done yet, once the AIO and GPU are installed, getting to the ports on the motherboard would become quite a challenge. I therefore installed most of the cables at this point, with only the GPU’s PCIe power connectors and AIO fan connectors left for later.

The SG14 doesn’t really do much in the way of cable management, which with a big ATX PSU is a bit annoying as you end up with a lot of cable slack you need to tuck away, but given that it’s a case that doesn’t have any glass, I don’t really mind.

Step 4: GPU Install

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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Our Founders Edition RTX 2070 Super dropped right into place without any fuss. As you can see, there is plenty of space remaining for the big RTX 3080 or RTX 3090 GPUs of today, and with access to fresh air straight through the side panel, thermal performance should be decent, too.

Step 5: AIO Installation

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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

I then installed the Corsair H100i Elite Capellix AIO watercooler. This was a bit of a challenge with the tight space, but by installing the CPU block first, and then the radiator it was manageable. The only thing I didn’t like about this step was connecting up the RGB headers and fan controls to the Commander hub. There wasn’t a lot of room for the hib, so I placed it where the internal 2.5-inch drive would have gone.

Step 6: Build Complete

Silverstone Sugo 14

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

All things considered, this was one of the easiest ITX cases I’ve ever built in. The build process was straight forward, and the ability to build from the inside outwards with all panels removed makes it surprisingly easy to get to everything you need to. Of course, if you need to get to the motherboard, you’ll need to remove the AIO and graphics card first, but this case should be pleasantly easy to service over the course of ownership.

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Niels Broekhuijsen

Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He reviews cases, water cooling and pc builds.