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Rumor: Verizon May Cancel or Delay Own Windows Phone 8

By - Source: Daily Mobile | B 22 comments

Verizon may drop Windows Phone 8 support because it can't remotely manage the devices.

Daily Mobile calls exclusive on a report that could spell trouble between Microsoft and Verizon. The typical unnamed source has informed the site that Verizon may delay or even cancel support for devices based on the upcoming Windows Phone 8 platform.

According to the source, Verizon Wireless requires smartphone manufacturers to implement remote access for provisioning and other device management. But Windows Phone 8, in its current state, doesn't allow for that kind of access, thus Verizon is now re-considering its support for the platform.

The source claims that remote access is required for optimal performance on Verizon's network. If the Big Red doesn't have direct access, then the phone could enter into a state where it stops responding to certain systems on Verizon's network.

Verizon Wireless is reportedly in discussions now with Microsoft about getting "waivers" to address the issue, but the Redmond company is said to be unwilling to cooperate. If an agreement isn't reached by the time the first Windows Phone 8 update is released, then Verizon may not carry the devices at all.

Of course, this is all rumor at this point, but we must point out that Verizon is one of Android's biggest customers as the Droid line has shown – the Big Red will survive without Windows Phone 8 coverage. However Verizon Chief Marketing Officer Tami Erwin indicated back in September that the company planned to launch multiple Windows Phone 8 devices in the fourth quarter, one of them manufactured by Nokia.

 

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  • 19 Hide
    Anonymous , October 19, 2012 9:01 PM
    they probibly only use it to SPY on their users to be honest.
  • 15 Hide
    bigdragon , October 19, 2012 9:44 PM
    I don't want Verizon to have these features so I support Microsoft. Verizon just wants more marketing data to sell without our permission. I may not be a fan of Windows 8, but the more I read about Windows Phone 8 the more I like it and will consider getting one. Get those waivers, Microsoft.
  • 13 Hide
    ejb222 , October 19, 2012 8:57 PM
    Can someone explain the technology that they are talking about? Why doesn't any other carrier need this. Is there a distinct advantage to this for consumers?
Other Comments
  • -4 Hide
    internetlad , October 19, 2012 8:52 PM
    goddamnit verizon, You're like, the only network that covers my area that isn't inherently evil and you can't get ANY good, unique phones.

    goddamnit.
  • 13 Hide
    ejb222 , October 19, 2012 8:57 PM
    Can someone explain the technology that they are talking about? Why doesn't any other carrier need this. Is there a distinct advantage to this for consumers?
  • 19 Hide
    Anonymous , October 19, 2012 9:01 PM
    they probibly only use it to SPY on their users to be honest.
  • 13 Hide
    wildkitten , October 19, 2012 9:08 PM
    Don't give in Microsoft. Verizon is simply becoming incredibly customer unfriendly.

    First they turn their loyalty discount into a loyalty fee, then they start pushing these much more expensive data share plans, now they put remote access components into their phones (the Bionic's new ICS upgrade has it) and un order to freeze or delete it you have to root, and they now have root checkers built into the phone. Rumor is on several Droid forums is that if someone has ever rooted they may charge more for support or deny it altogether.

    I'm glad Microsoft is taking a stand against this intrusiveness the way Apple did. Now if only Google would do the same.
  • 10 Hide
    wildkitten , October 19, 2012 9:10 PM
    ejb222Can someone explain the technology that they are talking about? Why doesn't any other carrier need this. Is there a distinct advantage to this for consumers?

    Think of it as a remote desktop connection for your phone. Supposedly it's there for diagnosing and fixing your phone, but would you accept an always on remote desktop connection on your computer?

    It's more than likely if other carriers don't do it yet, they probably will start.
  • 3 Hide
    jhansonxi , October 19, 2012 9:32 PM
    ejb222Can someone explain the technology that they are talking about? Why doesn't any other carrier need this. Is there a distinct advantage to this for consumers?

    The existence of this "feature" means that if I get a phone from Verizon it will be rootable so I can get rid of it.
  • 15 Hide
    bigdragon , October 19, 2012 9:44 PM
    I don't want Verizon to have these features so I support Microsoft. Verizon just wants more marketing data to sell without our permission. I may not be a fan of Windows 8, but the more I read about Windows Phone 8 the more I like it and will consider getting one. Get those waivers, Microsoft.
  • 11 Hide
    Cheeba Hawk , October 19, 2012 10:36 PM
    Verizon is never gonna support Windows phone like the should. They only had one. Not everyone wants an Android Phone. May have to switch soon. Been wanting a Windows phone for the longest too. Their phone library is craptakular compared to other providers.
  • 1 Hide
    house70 , October 19, 2012 11:00 PM
    wildkitten....I'm glad Microsoft is taking a stand against this intrusiveness the way Apple did. Now if only Google would do the same.

    You seem to have a poor understanding of how pure AOSP Android works (you know, Android the Google way). Android happens to be a very secure OS by DEFAULT, and no app can run without the admin's permission.
    If you take AOSP source code and modify it in order to give yourself root access without the owner's permission (which is what Verizon requires in their ROMs) you can do that and pretty much run a remote desktop on that phone, but that is NOT Android anymore, it's just a crippled clone.
    Rest assured, all the phones that run on Verizon's network and have NOT been altered by their owners (by rooting, for instance, in Android's case, followed by Verizon's app removal, or by custom ROM installation) have these remote access permission on them by default. That includes iPhones, too; just because you don't know about it doesn't mean it is not there.
    With iPhones, the problem is more serious, because AFAIK there are no custom iOS versions to be developed and installed instead of Apple's version; the only thing that jailbreaking does is installing the parallel App market Cydia. Verizon's spyware might still reside on the device without the user's knowledge.
    In Microsoft's case, it's about the manufacturer not willing to give admin rights to Verizon on the phone, and Verizon is not accepting to sell these phones on their network. They never did and never will.

    EVERY phone sold by Verizon has this "feature" implemented. It's the nature of Android that allows owners to bypass that by installing custom ROMs (where possible, of course), but these customers lose all support from Verizon. Just read their official explanation:
    "The source claims that remote access is required for optimal performance on Verizon's network. If the Big Red doesn't have direct access, then the phone could enter into a state where it stops responding to certain systems on Verizon's network."
    This is applicable for ALL their phones,regardless of their OS, because otherwise they would publicly admit they are selling some phones that are already crippled on their network. This might as well be their first official acknowledgement that ALL their phones are "bugged", and the ONLY way to get rid of that bug is to modify the OS (by Microsoft, in WP8's case, or by installing custom ROMs in Android's case).
  • 2 Hide
    Antimatter79 , October 19, 2012 11:12 PM
    wildkittenThink of it as a remote desktop connection for your phone. Supposedly it's there for diagnosing and fixing your phone, but would you accept an always on remote desktop connection on your computer?It's more than likely if other carriers don't do it yet, they probably will start.


    AT&T also does this, but it's not necessarily just fixing the phone. Provisioning means adding/removing features. For instance, if you switch from an old school clamshell to a new smart phone, you will likely need to upgrade to a data plan. When you get the new phone, you won't have data access until they provision the account with the new plan, and the phone then syncs with Verizon's billing systems and voila, you have data access. It can also involve resetting your phone's record of what towers/stations are in your local network area as well. I'd imagine the only other way your phone could be properly provisioned is maybe to walk into a Verizon store and maybe they plug your phone into a computer there or something. Not sure, as I work for AT&T. I'm speaking on behalf of myself, not AT&T. It's nothing new, I've been there 8 yrs and 5 days, and that has been the way it has always worked, from GSM, EDGE, HSDPA, and now LTE. I'm not sure if it was that way on their old TDMA network.
  • 6 Hide
    Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer , October 19, 2012 11:49 PM
    internetladgoddamnit verizon, You're like, the only network that covers my area that isn't inherently evil and you can't get ANY good, unique phones.goddamnit.

    Waaait a minute...are we talking about the same Verizon? The Verizon that won't carry Windows phones because Microsoft won't let them install backdoors on them?
  • 6 Hide
    dalethepcman , October 20, 2012 12:06 AM
    I'm thinking this is along the same lines as advertisers becoming upset about "do not track" being built into IE10.

    Personally I kind of like the direction Microsoft is headed in from a consumer protection standpoint. The stock holders will probably be upset about it, but I could give a steamy pile what they think.
  • 5 Hide
    exentrick , October 20, 2012 12:11 AM
    Will switch from Verizon if I can't buy a windows phone...
  • 2 Hide
    wildkitten , October 20, 2012 12:34 AM
    house70You seem to have a poor understanding of how pure AOSP Android works (you know, Android the Google way). Android happens to be a very secure OS by DEFAULT, and no app can run without the admin's permission.If you take AOSP source code and modify it in order to give yourself root access without the owner's permission (which is what Verizon requires in their ROMs) you can do that and pretty much run a remote desktop on that phone, but that is NOT Android anymore, it's just a crippled clone. Rest assured, all the phones that run on Verizon's network and have NOT been altered by their owners (by rooting, for instance, in Android's case, followed by Verizon's app removal, or by custom ROM installation) have these remote access permission on them by default. That includes iPhones, too; just because you don't know about it doesn't mean it is not there.With iPhones, the problem is more serious, because AFAIK there are no custom iOS versions to be developed and installed instead of Apple's version; the only thing that jailbreaking does is installing the parallel App market Cydia. Verizon's spyware might still reside on the device without the user's knowledge. In Microsoft's case, it's about the manufacturer not willing to give admin rights to Verizon on the phone, and Verizon is not accepting to sell these phones on their network. They never did and never will. EVERY phone sold by Verizon has this "feature" implemented. It's the nature of Android that allows owners to bypass that by installing custom ROMs (where possible, of course), but these customers lose all support from Verizon. Just read their official explanation:"The source claims that remote access is required for optimal performance on Verizon's network. If the Big Red doesn't have direct access, then the phone could enter into a state where it stops responding to certain systems on Verizon's network."This is applicable for ALL their phones,regardless of their OS, because otherwise they would publicly admit they are selling some phones that are already crippled on their network. This might as well be their first official acknowledgement that ALL their phones are "bugged", and the ONLY way to get rid of that bug is to modify the OS (by Microsoft, in WP8's case, or by installing custom ROMs in Android's case).

    Actually, Apple controls iOS, not Verizon. Apple had originally gone to Verizon for the original iPhone but Verizon wanted control of the OS, in other words be presented builds for approval by Verizon and Apple said no and went to AT&T. Verizon only relented because AT&T passed them in subscribers due to the iPhone, a lead Verizon regained with their purchase of Altell.

    But here's the thing, a person should not have to root in order to get rid of bloat/spyware. And Verizon is having the OEMs add in a root checker. If someone has never been rooted the checker shows "0/0", if it is rooted, it shows "1/1" and if it has been rooted but isn't currently it shows "0/1". The rumor is by many knowledgable on the Android forums is that Verizon will start charging higher fees for people who are or have rooted, thus discouraging people from rooting.
  • 2 Hide
    house70 , October 20, 2012 3:16 AM
    wildkittenActually, Apple controls iOS, not Verizon. Apple had originally gone to Verizon for the original iPhone but Verizon wanted control of the OS, in other words be presented builds for approval by Verizon and Apple said no and went to AT&T. Verizon only relented because AT&T passed them in subscribers due to the iPhone, a lead Verizon regained with their purchase of Altell.But here's the thing, a person should not have to root in order to get rid of bloat/spyware. And Verizon is having the OEMs add in a root checker. If someone has never been rooted the checker shows "0/0", if it is rooted, it shows "1/1" and if it has been rooted but isn't currently it shows "0/1". The rumor is by many knowledgable on the Android forums is that Verizon will start charging higher fees for people who are or have rooted, thus discouraging people from rooting.

    Of course Apple has control over iOS, just as Microsoft has control over WP8. This is not about controlling the OS itself, it's "only" about inserting hidden apps that can remotely access the devices.
    Because Verizon has admitted that the phones they sell on their network are "enhanced" with that feature, I can only be thankful for the open nature of Android, because that has been the one to raise the red flag for us. The closed OSes, like iOS and WP8, once they get accepted on Verizon's network, will have to play by the same rules (iOS is already there), but there is no way for outsiders to tell how the hidden apps are loaded and how to get rid of them.
    Of course Verizon is acting like a ****, this being their network and all. I personally don't understand why we still have this CDMA standard in place, where one does not actually own a phone (even though one pays for said phone). Trying to bring an outside CDMA phone on Verizon's network is like pulling teeth, and they will deny support if they actually accept the move (haven't heard of them accepting, though, but I might be wrong).
    And, we have to read between the lines here: Redmond is "said" to refuse to cooperate. What does that mean? It means this little squabble reached the media, and they have to save face and not look like a bunch of pu***** that put the relationship with Verizon above the touted security of their OS. I would not be surprised if Verizon will get eventually some WP8 phones, and the customer will never have a chance of finding out if his/her phone is "bugged" because we don't have access to the source code of the OS.
    Yes, a person should not have to change their OS in order to get rid of spyware. That is entirely Verizon's doing and a reason I will not get a phone that I can not modify to my liking. Now that Verizon has publicly admitted they have spyware on their phones, our only defense is to have access to the OS in order to restore it to what it was supposed to be (AOSP for Android, for instance). So far, the only OS that allows for that is Android.
    CDMA in general and Verizon in particular need to go the way of the dodo bird; this stuff with charging higher fees for people that take control of their phones is outrageous and could never be pulled of on a GSM network in a country where there is real competition between wireless providers. In most of the world, one can buy an unlocked phone and modify the cr@p out of it without any repercussions, and the networks allow that because the competitor's store is just around the corner, with pretty much similar coverage.
  • 2 Hide
    falchard , October 20, 2012 5:05 AM
    Verizon, giving T-Mobile more value daily.
    lol T-Mobile does not support the iPhone, now they will become the carrier for Windows Phone. Looks like the up and up for T-Mobile.
  • 3 Hide
    Anonymous , October 20, 2012 7:37 AM
    re: "Verizon Wireless requires smartphone manufacturers to implement remote access for provisioning and other device management."

    wow, talk about over reach / security hole
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , October 20, 2012 7:38 AM
    verizon has back door in fios router/modem as well they can basically come in anytime and spy / install stuff, ect.
  • 3 Hide
    Marcus52 , October 20, 2012 7:45 AM
    I was planning on getting a Win 8 phone on Verizon (if they offered a model I liked), but if they don't support Win 8 phones Verizon won't get my business at all.

  • 5 Hide
    pliskin1 , October 20, 2012 8:37 AM
    Silly Verizon, why are you so evil. The more I read about these Verizon stories, the more i'm glad i'm on AT&T. Granted their no angel either.
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