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Corsair TX550M Power Supply Review

The TX550M is another good PSU by Corsair.

Corsair TX550M
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

Performance Rating

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The overall performance is high enough, given that this unit should have a notable difference from the RM550x; else, it would create internal competition. The be quiet! Pure Power 11 FM and the Super Flower Leadex III Gold lead the category. 

Noise Rating

The graph below depicts the cooling fan's average noise over the PSU's operating range, with an ambient temperature between 30 to 32 degrees Celsius (86 to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Under normal operating temperatures, the average noise output is low. The Corsair RM550x has no competition here, though. 

Efficiency Rating

The following graph shows the PSU's average efficiency throughout its operating range with an ambient temperature close to 30 degrees Celsius.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The platform is more efficient than the one used in the RM550x, achieving third place in this chart. 

Power Factor Rating

The following graphs show the PSU's average power factor reading throughout its operating range with an ambient temperature close to 30 degrees Celsius and 115V/230V voltage input. 

The APFC converter has decent performance, but there is room for improvement with 230V input. 

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Aris Mpitziopoulos
Aris Mpitziopoulos

Aris Mpitziopoulos is a Contributing Editor at Tom's Hardware US, covering PSUs.

  • WrongRookie
    Is there a way to tell if it supports full range input till 240v?
    Reply
  • Tom Sunday
    Most of the PSU’s are made by a small group of manufacturers, and resellers simply buy those manufacturers PSU's and then rebrand them as their own products. I usually buy SeaSonic because pure and simple they are a manufacturer. They make all their own PSU’s and sell them to consumers. So going with a SeaSonic PSU is almost certainly to be a safe bet. I also found that resellers generally offer three to five-year warrenties on their PSU's, and Seasonic offers in many cases five to twelve-year waranties. This alone tells the story and in how much confidence the reseller usually has towards its selected manufacturer.

    In turn CORSAIR is a true reseller, not a manufacturer. This can be a big deal. They buy their PSU’s from their original manufacturers so the quality of their products ultimately depends on their original manufacturers or perhaps those manufacturers which returned the lowest fabrication bid on a large CORSAIR factory order. It can be difficult to find out where CORSAIR’s PSU’s come from as CORSAIR has routinely been using 3-5 different manufacturers and in diffrent countries. In time likes these where high wattage and or premium PSU’s (1200W-1600W) may easily exceed $400 plus to especially feed the upcoming 4000 series GPU craze, picking the right PSU becomes important! As one of the dealers at the recent computer show noted: “SeaSonic principally specializes in PSU’s while CORSAIR markets and sells hundreds of different products. “Go take your pick!”
    Reply