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Aerocool DS (Dead Silence) Case Review

A Good-Looking Case With A Little Room For Improvement

Aerocool's DS is a compact cube-shaped case that’s able to accommodate powerful gaming hardware, whether you use it in its stock form or add a couple of cooling fans. Its strengths include a nice-looking, lively design and good use of minimal space. Separating the interior into chambers, putting core components up top and everything else down below, helps keep the heat from certain parts from affecting others. In this way, very tall CPU coolers, long graphics cards, and even 240 mm radiators can fit.

The stock cooling solution consists of a 200 mm front fan and a 120 mm rear fan, both of which spin fairly slowly, but still manage to maintain reasonable temperatures. A stock closed top cover can be replaced with an optional mesh one to improve the Dead Silence's thermal performance (particularly if you then choose to utilize the two spaces for additional fans right underneath it).

Aerocool's DS is sturdily-built, relatively quiet, and covered in a nice soft-touch surface. Everything inside is easy to reach during installation, and cable routing (and hiding) works well too, in spite of the enclosure's small size.

There’s some room for improvement as well, though. We'd like to see the rear case fan replaced by something quieter. Aerocool could also have added a fan controller with two settings, the second of which would spin the fans faster, improving the stock configuration's cooling capabilities.

At the end of the day, Aerocool's Dead Silence is an attractive, well-designed, and versatile chassis with plenty of room for enthusiast-oriented hardware in a compact form factor. We liked its estimated price tag, but are less certain about the new MSRP of $120. The fact that it'll be available in so many color combinations is definitely nice, though. If you don't mind making some minor improvements (like replacing the rear case fan), you'll be happy with a small gaming machine based on this case.

  • Protino
    So organized and neat..!
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    Well damn. I really like this thing, but it's just too big for a mini-ITX rig, and there are a lot better options out there for micro-ATX.
    Reply
  • slyu9213
    I agree kind of big and not sure how silent it is. But when I think of gaming I don't think of silent. Especially with some of the fans on the video cards.
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    But that's why you watercool. ;)
    (Which this case doesn't have amazing support for. There aren't any good 200mm radiators to put in the front.)
    Reply
  • chumly
    Can you guys take a thermal reading at the point between the motherboard and PSU when the system is at load please?
    Reply
  • Crashman
    11743015 said:
    Well damn. I really like this thing, but it's just too big for a mini-ITX rig, and there are a lot better options out there for micro-ATX.
    Did anyone see any mention of the Bitfenix Prodigy? I used the Mini ITX version of this case in the June System Builder Marathon.
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    11743356 said:
    Did anyone see any mention of the Bitfenix Prodigy? I used the Mini ITX version of this case in the June System Builder Marathon.

    Hang on, I'm confused. Two points.

    1) I've used a prodigy before, and consider it huge for mini-ITX. It has its uses, but it's specialized... but no, I didn't see it mentioned in the article. What does that have to do with it?

    2) Wait, I'm confused. Is "this case" referring to the prodigy or to this dead silence case. Does the case reviewed in the article actually have two versions, a mini-itx and a matx? If so (and the matx isn't done as poorly as the matx prodiy), that would be awesome.

    Reply
  • Crashman
    11743462 said:
    11743356 said:
    Did anyone see any mention of the Bitfenix Prodigy? I used the Mini ITX version of this case in the June System Builder Marathon.

    Hang on, I'm confused. Two points.

    1) I've used a prodigy before, and consider it huge for mini-ITX. It has its uses, but it's specialized... but no, I didn't see it mentioned in the article. What does that have to do with it?

    2) Wait, I'm confused. Is "this case" referring to the prodigy or to this dead silence case. Does the case reviewed in the article actually have two versions, a mini-itx and a matx? If so (and the matx isn't done as poorly as the matx prodiy), that would be awesome.
    Now I'm confused? I just looked at the pictures and spotted a case structurally identical to my Mini ITX Prodigy, except for the added width. Does the different plastic really disguise it that well?

    Or are you thinking of the completely-revised Prodigy M, rather than the original Prodigy? Please take another look at the original Prodigy. If this case is better than the Prodigy M and I'd tested both, I'd have probably called the DS "What the Prodigy M should have been"

    Reply
  • Myrkvidr
    I would have compared the DS to the Prodigy, but unfortunately I never received one of the Bitfenix ITS-Cases for testing...
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    11743552 said:
    Now I'm confused? I just looked at the pictures and spotted a case structurally identical to my Mini ITX Prodigy, except for the added width. Does the different plastic really disguise it that well?

    Or are you thinking of the completely-revised Prodigy M, rather than the original Prodigy? Please take another look at the original Prodigy. If this case is better than the Prodigy M and I'd tested both, I'd have probably called the DS "What the Prodigy M should have been"

    Okay, gotcha, yes. It's another Prodigy spinoff, I agree. I still consider it large, though. :P
    Reply