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EVGA SuperNOVA 1600 P2 Power Supply Review

EVGA recently introduced its flagship power supply, the SuperNOVA 1600 P2. In addition to monstrous capacity, it also features 80 PLUS Platinum efficiency, promises top performance levels and offers silent operation in semi-passive mode.

Transient Response Tests

In these tests, we monitor the response of the PSU in two different scenarios. First, a transient load (10A at +12V, 5A at 5V, 5A at 3.3V and 0.5A at 5VSB) is applied to the PSU for 200ms while the PSU is working at 20-percent load. In the second scenario, the PSU is hit by the same transient load while operating at 50-percent load. In both tests, we use our oscilloscope to measure the voltage drops caused by the transient load. The voltages should remain within the ATX specification's regulation limits.

These tests are crucial since they simulate transient loads a PSU is likely to handle (such as booting a RAID array, an instant 100-percent load of CPU/GPUs, etc.). We call these tests "Advanced Transient Response Tests," and they are designed to be very tough to master, especially for a PSU with a capacity below 500W.

Advanced Transient Response 20%
VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.216V12.179V0.30%Pass
5V5.045V4.935V2.18%Pass
3.3V3.312V3.180V3.99%Pass
5VSB5.031V5.003V0.56%Pass
Advanced Transient Response 50%
VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.183V12.143V0.33%Pass
5V5.029V4.923V2.11%Pass
3.3V3.299V3.170V3.91%Pass
5VSB5.007V4.978V0.58%Pass

At +12V, this unit registers superb performance. In the high-capacity segment, only the 1600 G2 manages to match and even outdo this unit's showing in this rail and test. On the minor rails, the results are only average, though the situation improves at 5VSB. There, performance is  top-notch and the 1600 P2 scores first place in the corresponding chart, with the 1600 G2 close behind.

Below are the oscilloscope screenshots we took during Advanced Transient Response Testing.

Transient Response At 20-Percent Load

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Transient Response At 50-Percent Load

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Turn-On Transient Tests

We measure the response of the PSU in simpler transient load scenarios—during the power-on phase—in the next set of tests.

For the first measurement, we turn the PSU off, dial in the maximum current the 5VSB can output and then switch on the PSU. In the second test, we dial the maximum load +12V can handle and start the PSU while it's in standby mode. In the last test, while the PSU is completely switched off (we cut off power or switch the PSU off by flipping its on/off switch), we dial the maximum load the +12V rail can handle before switching the PSU on from the loader and restoring power. The ATX specification states that recorded spikes on all rails should not exceed 10 percent of their nominal values (+10 percent for 12V is 13.2V and 5.5V for 5V).

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There is only a tiny voltage overshoot at 5VSB, which is nothing to worry about, and the results of the other two tests are close to perfection. It is amazing to see a 1.6kW monster instantly delivering its full power without the slightest problem.

  • damric
    Good review, but missing the hot box testing to see if this thing regulates and suppresses ripple at 50C as advertised.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    All tests were conducted at high ambient temperatures which during full load were above 47C. Only the Cross-Load tests were conducted at 28-30C.
    Reply
  • SinxarKnights
    I appreciate the detailed review.
    Reply
  • Giannis Karagiannis
    Very detailed review indeed. There isn't really anything that could be covered and it is not. I don't think that there are many PSU manufacturers out there that can test their products so extensively.
    Reply
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Too light for me I have the 2000w coming from Dabs when it comes to retail.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    I had the opportunity to test the 2 kW model (from Super Flower) and it is indeed superb. But it will provide 2 kW only with 230 VAC input since a normal socket can deliver only up to 15 A of current.
    Reply
  • damric
    15234131 said:
    Too light for me I have the 2000w coming from Dabs when it comes to retail.

    Where are you from that you need all that power? Cybertron?
    Reply
  • damric
    15233469 said:
    All tests were conducted at high ambient temperatures which during full load were above 47C. Only the Cross-Load tests were conducted at 28-30C.

    47C ambients? Must have been sweating your language, please off, or you are language, please me.
    Reply
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    I'm going to power my Skynet build with it.
    Reply
  • damric
    15234630 said:
    I'm going to power my Skynet build with it.

    One day you need to show us a picture of everything. I've seen little snapshots here and there, but I'd like to see it all in one thread.
    Reply