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AMD Threadripper 1920X Hits All-Time Low $199.99

(Image credit: Newegg)

If you need a CPU with an abundant number of cores, the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X may be the perfect fit. The 12-core chip, which usually sells for over $350, can be yours today for just $199. That's the lowest price we've ever seen for this CPU. 

Part of AMD's first-generation Ryzen Threadripper lineup, the Threadripper 1920X boasts 12 cores, 24 threads and up to 32MB of L3 cache. The processor has a 3.5 GHz base clock and a boost clock that hits the 4 GHz. It comes with a completely unlocked multiplier, so you can overclock the core-heavy monster to gain even more performance.

With a discounted price of $199, the Threadripper 1920X is currently the cheapest 12-core chip in AMD's arsenal and on the market.

AMD Threadripper 1920X vs. Threadripper 2920X vs. Ryzen 9 3900X

ModelCores /ThreadsBase / Boost Clock (GHz)L3 Cache (MB)PCIe Unlocked MultiplierDRAMTDPPrice (at time of writing)Price Per Core
AMD Ryzen 9 3900X12 / 243.8 / 4.664PCIe 4.0 x 24YesDual DDR4-3200105W$499$41.58
AMD Threadripper 2920X12 / 243.5 / 4.332PCIe 3.0 x 64YesQuad DDR4-2933180W$377.43$31.45
AMD Threadripper 1920X12 / 243.5 / 4.032PCIe 3.0 x 64YesQuad DDR4-2667180W$199$16.58

As you would expect from a HEDT (high-end desktop) processor, the Threadripper 1920X supports quad-channel memory and memory speeds up to 2,667 MHz. When paired with the right X399-based motherboard, the Threadripper 1920X can support up to 256GB of memory, so you can open tabs to your heart's content and still have plenty of memory leftover.

In regards to PCIe connectivity, the Threadripper 1920X supports to 64 PCIe 3.0 lanes. You can run multiple graphics cards configurations, PCIe storage arrays and a good number of PCIe-based expansion cards without worry.

Should You Buy This CPU?

We highly recommend you check out our in-depth AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X review before opening your wallet.

You can also review our CPU buying guide for help. To see where this processor ranks among others currently available, including from rival Intel, check out our CPU hierarchy page. And for other CPUs we love, see our favorite gaming CPUs and favorite CPUs for productivity performance.

  • TCA_ChinChin
    For budget workstations, this is actually unprecedented value. Can you imagine a TWELVE core TWENTY FOUR thread processor for 260$?
    Reply
  • penn919
    TCA_ChinChin said:
    For budget workstations, this is actually unprecedented value. Can you imagine a TWELVE core TWENTY FOUR thread processor for 260$?
    Not so fast. You still have to get a TR4 board for that cpu. Those definitely aren't cheap.
    Reply
  • TCA_ChinChin
    penn919 said:
    Not so fast. You still have to get a TR4 board for that cpu. Those definitely aren't cheap.
    For entry level workstation, TR4 is a bargain. Expensive for mainstream/enthusiast, but with the relevant features for workstation.

    Yes the board's are expensive, but that doesn't change the fact that the processor is a bargain.
    Reply
  • Olle P
    TCA_ChinChin said:
    For entry level workstation, TR4 is a bargain. Expensive for mainstream/enthusiast, but with the relevant features for workstation.
    Doesn't "relevant features" depend on what you're using it for?
    If you can make good use of the features sported on a TR4 board but don't need (particularly) much CPU power, then sure.
    But if more CPU power can be used then it's more cost effective to spend more on a better CPU.
    Reply
  • TCA_ChinChin
    Olle P said:
    Doesn't "relevant features" depend on what you're using it for?
    If you can make good use of the features sported on a TR4 board but don't need (particularly) much CPU power, then sure.
    But if more CPU power can be used then it's more cost effective to spend more on a better CPU.
    Exactly. Its so much value for people that can use the 12 cores along with the features that are on the TR4 platform. Ergo, its quite good value for workstations.
    Reply
  • Olle P
    TCA_ChinChin said:
    Exactly. Its so much value for people that can use the 12 cores along with the features that are on the TR4 platform. Ergo, its quite good value for workstations.
    But if you can use 12 cores you will often do even better with 16 or more cores.
    If it's just the mobo features that are relevant the 8 core Threadripper should do just as well.
    Reply
  • TCA_ChinChin
    There only a 50$ difference between the 1900x and the 1920x so yeah, gives you more options. If you need mobo features at the lowest price, then the 1900x is great. Otherwise, if you need slightly more cores, then you can go with 1950x. However, the 1950x is significantly more expensive at 450$. All of them are still good deals, just the 1920x is a better deal than the 1950x, and the 1900x is similar-ish in value.
    Reply
  • BaRoMeTrIc
    not a bad deal, with a $230 asrock phantom x399, 32-64 gb vengeance lpx for 130-260, a 1080ti, or titan Xp used, and a Tesla k40 used, you have a nice workstation, with some room to deploy a few remote clients.
    Reply
  • mdd1963
    penn919 said:
    Not so fast. You still have to get a TR4 board for that cpu. Those definitely aren't cheap.

    Plenty of reasonably priced TR4 boards, but granted, you are not finding any at B450 pricing... :)
    Reply
  • kinggremlin
    TCA_ChinChin said:
    For entry level workstation, TR4 is a bargain. Expensive for mainstream/enthusiast, but with the relevant features for workstation.

    Yes the board's are expensive, but that doesn't change the fact that the processor is a bargain.

    Companies don't buy CPU's. They buy workstations. Only the overall cost matters. Where can you buy a prebuilt 1920x workstation currently?
    Reply