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Asus Rolls Out ROG Strix RX Vega Cards, With Scant Details

It would seem as though Asus’ ROG Strix RX VEGA 64 OC and ROG Strix RX VEGA 56 OC graphics cards are finally here.

Originally announced back in August, a variety of technical issues affected the initial production of custom RX Vega graphics cards from add-in board makers such as Asus. Now that those issues are (presumably) out of the way, we’ve seen Radeon RX Vega card announcements from both PowerColor and Gigabyte in recent days. Now, according to a pair of product pages on the company's website, Asus is ready to join the party.

Although no clock speeds are listed for this pair of custom-cooled factory overclocked ROG Strix RX Vega OC graphics cards, we can safely assume that these cards will feature the same base specs for AMD’s reference design RX Vega 64 and RX Vega 56 we reviewed earlier this year.

Graphics cards equipped with a Vega 10 GPU feature a 14nm FinFET LPP manufacturing process, 12.5 billion transistors, four Asynchronous Compute units, four next-gen Geometry units, 256 texture units, and 8GB of HBM2 memory. Additionally, video cards based on the RX Vega 64 have 4,096 stream processors and the RX Vega 56 cards have 3,584. Both cards require two 8-pin PCIe power connectors.

Radeon RX Vega series cards also support bridgeless CrossFire for when you want to use more than one GPU simultaneously. They support AMD FreeSync Technology, which eliminates image tears and choppiness, as well as AMD Eyefinity for a panoramic multi-screen gaming experience on up to four monitors.

Asus’ Strix RX Vega line of cards are equipped with large triple fan coolers that include the company’s proprietary MaxContact Technology that Asus claims is 10x flatter than traditional heat spreaders, allowing for twice as much contact with the GPU and resulting in improved thermal transfer.

Both coolers are outfitted with Wing-Blade IP5X-certified fans. As you might expect, Asus includes a metal backplate that adds structural strength to prevent the card from bending and twisting under the weight of the massive triple-fan cooler. The fan shroud and backplate are equipped with built-in RGB lighting, which allows you to custom tailor the look of your graphics card to your system using the included Aura Sync software.

We reached out to the company for information on clock speeds, pricing, and availability.

AsusStrix RX Vega 64 OCStrix RX Vega 56 OC
GPU Cores4,0963,584
Memory Size8GB
Memory Bus2048 bit
Memory TypeHBM2
Direct X12
Open GL4.5
PCB FormATX
I/O2 x HDMI 2.0b2 x DisplayPort 1.41 x DVI
Multi-view4
PowerRequirement650W750W
  • elektrofusion
    Power requirement 56>64 ?
    Price jump again?!!
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    20437557 said:
    Power requirement 56>64 ?
    Price jump again?!!

    Obviously they have it backwards.

    Still though 750W for that GPU? Even the 1080 Ti only requires 600W minimum. This makes me think that the 14nm they are using is leaking a ton of power unless Asus was able to pull off an ungodly overclock.
    Reply
  • svan71
    It would be nice if Asus released The Maximus X Formula they announced in September too.
    Reply
  • berezini
    Jimmysmitty, amd is not nvidia. Please dont assume amd can pull off what nvidia can with their products.
    Reply
  • YoAndy
    Vega cards are not good compared with nvidia, they use more power delivering somewhat less performance
    Reply
  • jasonelmore
    Sounds like AMD. They rushed it out the door to meet holiday season and now they've made all their partners be guinea pigs by forcing them to help with months of troubleshooting. AMD better be giving it's AIB partners a good deal on GPU dies with all of the work they've had to do to make VEGA overclock stable.
    Reply
  • foxinatardis
    Those product pages have been there for well over a month. Hardly the "news" you claim it to be.
    Reply
  • photonboy
    Hey guys, it's known (Raja said this) that RX-480 cards (and everything that followed) is based on a MOBILE design that was meant to optimize for probably about 1000MHz. AMD needed something to compete with NVidia but didn't have the resources to properly create an optimized desktop GPU for this purpose... we'd hoped by RX-VEGA they could have sorted out this a bit better but nope... we should see a REFRESH for both VEGA and RYZEN in 2018 though that optimized for both power draw and makes minor architectural changes...

    RX-VEGA64 in particular will look far better with a refresh since it will not only perform better but a few more games should come out by then that start to showcase the potential of its architecture. AMD still has some growing pains in its hardware and software though so I hope they can stick with it as competition is a good thing.
    Reply
  • photonboy
    YOANDY,
    RX-VEGA is an excellent architecture with two main drawbacks. One is the power efficiency, and the second is the lack of software that will utilize the card well. (and the pricing too)... if we fast forward a year, RX-VEGA will do better relative to the current NVidia competition in some games...

    I'm not necessarily recommending RX-VEGA but people should at least educate themselves a bit better. For example, if an Asus Strix RX-VEGA56 card cost the same as an Asus Strix GTX1070 I'd probably go with the VEGA56 card, but if it was a GTX1080 I'd need to think more carefully about it...

    Problem is though that due to driver and game support issues, the RX-VEGA56 card is 75% the performance of a GTX1080 in some games and beats the GTX1080 slightly in others so it's all over the place whereas the GTX1080 is much more consistent... then there's the question of stability and smoothness which is hard to answer...

    Anyway, AMD has a great architecture happening and since the core GCN architecture approach is in the XBOX ONE and PS4 game consoles we can expect code to optimize toward that more as time goes on (and NVidia's next GPU's to more closely approximate GCN as well primarily due to the console influence).
    Reply
  • YoAndy
    20449214 said:
    YOANDY,
    RX-VEGA is an excellent architecture with two main drawbacks. One is the power efficiency, and the second is the lack of software that will utilize the card well. (and the pricing too)... if we fast forward a year, RX-VEGA will do better relative to the current NVidia competition in some games...

    I'm not necessarily recommending RX-VEGA but people should at least educate themselves a bit better. For example, if an Asus Strix RX-VEGA56 card cost the same as an Asus Strix GTX1070 I'd probably go with the VEGA56 card, but if it was a GTX1080 I'd need to think more carefully about it...

    Problem is though that due to driver and game support issues, the RX-VEGA56 card is 75% the performance of a GTX1080 in some games and beats the GTX1080 slightly in others so it's all over the place whereas the GTX1080 is much more consistent... then there's the question of stability and smoothness which is hard to answer...

    Anyway, AMD has a great architecture happening and since the core GCN architecture approach is in the XBOX ONE and PS4 game consoles we can expect code to optimize toward that more as time goes on (and NVidia's next GPU's to more closely approximate GCN as well primarily due to the console influence).

    So we need to educate ourselves and thats correct, thats why I would choose the GTX 1070 Ti that costs $449 instead of the RX Vega 56 that costs $649, the GTX 1070 Ti uses 180W instead of 210W and the GTX 1070 Ti as of today is the fastest and most efficient card and saves you $200.
    Reply