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be quiet! Teases New AIO With Double-Decoupled Pump

(Image credit: be quiet!)

Introducing a new all-in-one liquid cooler in the US isn't easy if you're not using Asetek's designs, but be quiet! has come up with a creative solution to circumvent their patents. The German company's latest AIO is called the Pure Loop, which comes with a double-decoupled pump. Could this be a future addition to our Best CPU Coolers guide?

The double-decoupled pump is essentially one that is placed along the fluid lines, and be quiet! says that this design is to ensure quiet operation and minimal vibration.  

(Image credit: be quiet!)

be quiet! is equipping the Pure Loops with CPU blocks that come with nickel plating, a 27 mm thick radiator, and white LED lighting on the block. Even though most AIO's last long enough nowadays to not warrant early replacement, be quiet! built a refill port into the Pure Loops and ships it with a small bottle of coolant, so that you can refill it or top it off after running for 5 years to get a bit more life out of it, rather than retiring it to the landfill. 

The Pure Loop will come in 120mm, 240mm, 280mm, and 360mm variants, with pricing ranging from $85 to $120.

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(Image credit: be quiet!)
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(Image credit: be quiet!)
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(Image credit: be quiet!)

In the same briefing, be quiet! also informed us that it is coming out with a white version of the Shadow Rock 3 cooler, and it is updating the Silent Base 801 to the 802, which will come with extra front and top mesh covers so that you can pick between silence or performance.

The Pure Loop and white Shadow Rock 3 will be available in October, with the updated Silent Base chassis landing towards the end of November.

  • Endymio
    Perhaps a dumb question, but if the pumps are inline, from what exactly are they decoupled?
    Reply
  • Rdslw
    Endymio said:
    Perhaps a dumb question, but if the pumps are inline, from what exactly are they decoupled?
    its not connected directly to either end of cooling loop so you can replace or expand either end I suppose.
    it almost screams for breaking that aio into larger open loop. Like a starter pack for open loop guys.
    Reply
  • gamergeek
    Endymio said:
    Perhaps a dumb question, but if the pumps are inline, from what exactly are they decoupled?

    It mostly refers to the fact its not attached directly to the CPU cooling plate or directly to the radiator. Attaching it to the radiator presents many problems, partly that increasing the size of the radiator to fit a pump may interfere with mounting options. Attaching it directly to the CPU cooling plate is not allowed because Asetek holds a patent for that.
    Reply
  • nofanneeded
    Ugly design and not practical that pump should be part of the radiator ...
    Reply
  • grimfox
    By putting the pump in line they decouple the vibration from either the coldplate/motherboard and the radiator to reduce the vibration potentially transferred to the case.
    Reply
  • Endymio
    gamergeek said:
    It mostly refers to the fact its not attached directly to the CPU cooling plate or directly to the radiator...Attaching it directly to the CPU cooling plate is not allowed because Asetek holds a patent for that.
    Makes sense, thanks. I suppose the USPTO once again missed the "non-obvious" requirement for awarding a patent.
    Reply
  • jakjawagon
    Double-Decoupled

    Would that make it detripled or dequadrupled? Is it additive or multiplacative?
    Reply
  • escksu
    nofanneeded said:
    Ugly design and not practical that pump should be part of the radiator ...

    Well, they had no choice. Because of Asetek's patents. So they can't put the pump together with the waterblock (till the patent expire).
    Reply
  • escksu
    grimfox said:
    By putting the pump in line they decouple the vibration from either the coldplate/motherboard and the radiator to reduce the vibration potentially transferred to the case.

    haha, the real reason is that they put the pump with the block, they will need to pay fees and royalties to Asetek. The rest are just marketing.

    However, I do prefer the pump outside the block. The main issue with AIO is that the channels are way too narrow.
    Reply
  • drea.drechsler
    gamergeek said:
    .... Attaching it directly to the CPU cooling plate is not allowed because Asetek holds a patent for that.

    Actually it is allowed, but you have to pay Asetek licensing fees to do so.

    I have to wonder if dodging those license fees is what's allowing beQuiet to put these on offer at such low price points. I can't wait for reviews as they'll be a compelling alternative if the performance lives up to beQuiet standards. And I really like the understated styling that eschews RGB bling, although I expect that will inevitably come in the future.

    escksu said:
    .... The main issue with AIO is that the channels are way too narrow.

    AIO radiator channels can be so narrow because pump is low capacity. It's really the low capacity pumps that's the issue. While I hope this is a good AIO, I pretty well doubt it will be in the CCL class with high capacity pumps and hi-flow rad's.
    Reply