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Lenovo Lists Intel Cascade Lake Xeon CPU Lineup

Coincidence or not, Intel made two processor announcements one day ahead of AMD's Next Horizon event. The Santa Clara chipmaker disclosed its intentions to expand the Xeon family of processors with the upcoming Cascade Lake-AP (Advanced Performance) and Xeon E-2100 entry-level processors.

Intel also recently announced its Cascade Lake-SP (Scalable Performance) processors, but its announcement had very little technical information. The company also kept quiet about the planned models. Intel probably won't reveal those specifics until the official launch, which is supposed to be at the end of the year. However, Lenovo did the work for Intel and listed the entire Cascade Lake lineup with detailed specifications.

Lenovo's listing includes up to 39 different models from the Xeon Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum product lines. Curiously, Intel's confirmed 48-core Cascade Lake-AP monster wasn't among the processors listed. It's a good indication that the 48-core part isn't ready yet, and Intel is probably still putting the final touches on the chip. Cascade Lake-AP is expected to come out sometime in the first half of 2019.

Intel Cascade Lake Xeon Platinum Processors

ModelCoresBase ClockTDP
Intel Xeon Platinum 8280M282.7 GHz205W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8280L282.7 GHz205W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8280282.7 GHz205W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8276M282.3 GHz165W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8276L282.3 GHz165W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8276282.3 GHz165W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8270262.6 GHz205W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8268242.9 GHz205W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8260M242.4 GHz165W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8260L242.4 GHz165W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8260242.4 GHz165W
Intel Xeon Platinum 8260C24 / 20 / 162.4 GHz / 2.6 GHz / 2.8 GHz165W

Intel Cascade Lake Xeon Gold Processors

ModelCoresBase ClockTDP
Intel Xeon Gold 6252242.1 GHz150W
Intel Xeon Gold 6238T222.0 GHz125W
Intel Xeon Gold 6248202.6 GHz150W
Intel Xeon Gold 6230202.1 GHz125W
Intel Xeon Gold 6254183.2 GHz200W
Intel Xeon Gold 6240182.6 GHz150W
Intel Xeon Gold 6240C18 / 14 / 82.6 GHz / 2.8 GHz / 3.1 GHz150W
Intel Xeon Gold 5250182.9 GHz125W
Intel Xeon Gold 6242162.8 GHz150W
Intel Xeon Gold 5218162.3 GHz125W
Intel Xeon Gold 5128T162.2 GHz105W
Intel Xeon Gold 5117142.0 GHz105W
Intel Xeon Gold 5215M102.6 GHz85W
Intel Xeon Gold 5215L102.6 GHz85W
Intel Xeon Gold 5215102.6 GHz125W
Intel Xeon Gold 624483.7 GHz165W
Intel Xeon Gold 5217M83.0 GHz125W
Intel Xeon Gold 5217L83.0 GHz125W
Intel Xeon Gold 521783.0 GHz85W

Intel Cascade Lake Xeon Silver Processors

ModelCoresBase ClockTDP
Intel Xeon Silver 4216162.2 GHz100W
Intel Xeon Silver 4214122.2 GHz85W
Intel Xeon Silver 4214C12 / 10 /82.1 GHz /2.2 GHz / 2.3 GHz105W
Intel Xeon Silver 4210102.2 GHz85W
Intel Xeon Silver 421582.5 GHz85W
Intel Xeon Silver 4209T82.2 GHz70W
Intel Xeon Silver 420882.1 GHz85W

Intel Cascade Lake Xeon Bronze Processors

ModelCoresBase ClockTDP
Intel Xeon Bronze 320461.9 GHz85W
  • DavidC1
    It says its a Xeon Platinum 8280M.

    It looks like its a Cascade Lake-SP not -AP. Has everyone forgotten about the regular Cascade Lakes already?
    Reply
  • Reilly
    but can it run crysis?
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21475136 said:
    Lenovo's listing includes up to 39 different models from the Xeon Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum product lines.
    It would've been helpful to see a side-by-side list of equivalent Skylake-SP models. Otherwise, it's hard to see what might've changed.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21475440 said:
    It says its a Xeon Platinum 8280M.

    It looks like its a Cascade Lake-SP not -AP. Has everyone forgotten about the regular Cascade Lakes already?
    I guess the article was updated since you posted this, because the article now clearly states these are lists of Cascade Lake-SP models.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    The return of the core 2 duo... 2 chips glued together. We are far from Infinity Fabric. It just feels like a desperate attempt.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21478396 said:
    The return of the core 2 duo... 2 chips glued together. We are far from Infinity Fabric. It just feels like a desperate attempt.
    *sigh* this isn't the Cascade Lake-AP. Do you see any > 28-core SKUs in the list?

    Also, how do the cross-sectional bandwidth of Cascade Lake-AP and EPYC compare? I betcha don't know, because they haven't said exactly how they're connected (or even how many dies are in there, but 2 is the most reasonable guess). Anyway, UPI didn't exist back in the Core 2 era, so I think it's a baseless comparison.

    I think it would be good to focus posts more on facts & information and less on opinion & bashing.
    Reply
  • aldaia
    5% extra base clock (wondering about turbo clocks) at the expense of 10% extra TDP.
    For instance xeon gold 8160 is 2.10 GHz and 150W vs 8260 2.2 and 165W.
    Not sure if datacenters are gonna like it.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    21478654 said:
    21478396 said:
    The return of the core 2 duo... 2 chips glued together. We are far from Infinity Fabric. It just feels like a desperate attempt.
    *sigh* this isn't the Cascade Lake-AP. Do you see any > 28-core SKUs in the list?

    Also, how do the cross-sectional bandwidth of Cascade Lake-AP and EPYC compare? I betcha don't know, because they haven't said exactly how they're connected (or even how many dies are in there, but 2 is the most reasonable guess). Anyway, UPI didn't exist back in the Core 2 era, so I think it's a baseless comparison.

    I think it would be good to focus posts more on facts & information and less on opinion & bashing.

    Don't mind him. He tend to bash Intel and nVidia, yet strangely in his sig has a nVidia product.

    That said it would most likely be UPI connecting the two dies together much like it connects sockets. That's the only way I could see them doing it and it working well.

    With Core 2 it was never an issue though. On chip the dies communicated fast enough. Their biggest weakness was memory since it still lacked an IMC. For the desktop that didn't matter but server was an issue, especially higher end servers.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21479630 said:
    21478654 said:
    21478396 said:
    The return of the core 2 duo... 2 chips glued together. We are far from Infinity Fabric. It just feels like a desperate attempt.
    *sigh* this isn't the Cascade Lake-AP. Do you see any > 28-core SKUs in the list?

    Also, how do the cross-sectional bandwidth of Cascade Lake-AP and EPYC compare? I betcha don't know, because they haven't said exactly how they're connected (or even how many dies are in there, but 2 is the most reasonable guess). Anyway, UPI didn't exist back in the Core 2 era, so I think it's a baseless comparison.

    I think it would be good to focus posts more on facts & information and less on opinion & bashing.

    Don't mind him. He tend to bash Intel and nVidia, yet strangely in his sig has a nVidia product.
    I'm pretty sure it's a "her", not that it matters. I read the username as "red girl", and the profile pic is of a well-known red-haired female anime character from behind.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asuka_Langley_Soryu

    21479630 said:
    That said it would most likely be UPI connecting the two dies together much like it connects sockets. That's the only way I could see them doing it and it working well.
    Sure, but they haven't revealed the topology, clock speed, or the number of links connecting them.

    I think it would be interesting if they wired only one link in-package, and brought out the other 4. Then, the systems vendor could decide how to route the other pairs. Perhaps, in a 1-socket system, they will route however many pairs reach the socket so that all three links connect the two dies.
    Reply