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Intel Discontinues Hades Canyon NUCs With Kaby Lake-G CPUs

Intel NUC NUC8i7HVK

Intel NUC NUC8i7HVK (Image credit: Amazon)

Intel has announced that the company's Hades Canyon NUC product line has been discontinued. The mini-PCs debuted two years ago leveraging the chipmaker's 8th Generation Kaby Lake-G chips.

Hades Canyon, which was the successor to Skull Canyon, marks the first time that a NUC had arrived with a processor that wasn't completely made by Intel. Kaby Lake-G was one of those rare occasions where two natural-born rivals bonded together to make a product. While obviously based on the Kaby Lake microarchitecture, the 14nm chips featured AMD's Vega graphics.

Intel had already retired its Kaby Lake-G processors in October of last year so it was just a question of time  before the chipmaker discontinued its other products that are related with Kaby Lake-G. According to the PCN (Product Change Notification) document, Intel has axed the NUC8i7HNK and NUC8i7HVK NUC kits and mini-PCs. Both devices were based off quad-core Kaby Lake-G parts. The NUC8i7HNK utilized the Core i7-8705G, while the NUC8i7HVK rolled with the Core i7-8809G.

The NUC8i7HNK and NUC8i7HVK won't just suddenly disappear off the shelves though. Intel is giving its customers up to November 27 to place their last orders if they desire. The last shipments will go out on January 29, 2021.

  • Avro Arrow
    Is Hades Canyon supposed to be a play on words referencing Devil's Canyon? I never really understood the point of NUCs to begin with. I always thought of them as "Laptops that aren't" or "Almost-All-In-Ones" because they lack a display. They're 100% proprietary, less powerful than conventional desktops and disposable, just like laptops and All-In-Ones.
    Reply
  • 8iltvku
    Avro Arrow said:
    I never really understood the point of NUCs to begin with.

    That NUC is a nice living room computer for a large TV, if you're an adult and don't want a loud tower in that room. May people want a pad, or a laptop, and to each his own.

    I would have preferred Hades Canyon to have had an NVIDIA GPU, but I bought it anyway.
    Reply
  • Avro Arrow
    8iltvku said:
    That NUC is a nice living room computer for a large TV, if you're an adult and don't want a loud tower in that room.
    Ok, you're assuming two falsehoods there:

    #1 - Being an adult doesn't mean that you care about the size of your living room computer. I'm over 40 and I have a gigantic tower in my living room (60cm tall x 60cm deep x 23cm wide). Now, to be fair, my home is definitely not small and neither is my living room but that's nothing to do with my age (or maybe it is, since us older guys tend to have larger living spaces). I suppose it's possible that if someone lives in a postage stamp-sized studio apartment then maybe they would want something smaller but then they probably won't have a big TV either from lack of a place to put it. Remember that people of all ages have all different tastes and wanting a tiny (and mostly useless) PC in your living room doesn't make you more of an adult than anyone else.

    #2 - You said "loud tower" as if having a larger case makes the computer louder when the opposite is true. A case doesn't make noise, the parts inside do and a larger case does a better job of muffling the sound. Also, the larger a case is, the quieter it is (believe it or not) because you can use larger fans that spin slower because the case is larger and will have naturally better airflow. It's like comparing a triple-fan video card to a dual-fan. The triple-fan card will be quieter AND cooler despite having three fans instead of two.
    8iltvku said:
    I would have preferred Hades Canyon to have had an NVIDIA GPU, but I bought it anyway.
    Are you using this thing for gaming? You should never choose a computer that has non-upgradeable Intel Graphics if you want to game with it. If you're not using it for gaming, then an nVidia GPU would be the worst choice because ATi and Intel IGPs are on-die and are far more energy efficient. Since nVidia doesn't make CPUs, their GPUs are all separate. For non-3D applications, you wouldn't be able to tell one from the other because 2D and multimedia was made absolutely perfect more than ten years ago. The only difference between them are their 3D accelerators. Wanting an nVidia GPU for 2D applications is a bad idea.
    8iltvku said:
    May people want a pad, or a laptop, and to each his own.
    That doesn't change the fact that I never saw the point of them. You're also drawing a false equivalency with laptops and tablets. Laptops and tablets are specialised for mobile computing and connectivity that can be used anywhere because they have integrated displays and are designed for portability. They have a very specific purpose that they excel at.

    The NUC does not fit into in their category. The NUC is in the category of the "All-In-One" which has a display but has zero portability. Modern components generate a lot of heat, too much for a form-factor like that to be useful so mini-ITX probably killed it because mini-ITX is tiny, upgradeable, standardised, and far less expensive that Intel's NUC.
    Reply
  • GetSmart
    Finally Intel abandons Kaby Lake-G SoCs. Lesson learnt. Perhaps Intel should use NVidia or its own DG1 next time... :p
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    Avro Arrow said:
    Is Hades Canyon supposed to be a play on words referencing Devil's Canyon? I never really understood the point of NUCs to begin with. I always thought of them as "Laptops that aren't" or "Almost-All-In-Ones" because they lack a display. They're 100% proprietary, less powerful than conventional desktops and disposable, just like laptops and All-In-Ones.
    They're very popular in industry. The compact form factor makes them easier to mount on a wall or placed on a shelf as a control unit for something. Often they won't even be directly connected to display.
    Reply
  • Avro Arrow
    spongiemaster said:
    They're very popular in industry. The compact form factor makes them easier to mount on a wall or placed on a shelf as a control unit for something. Often they won't even be directly connected to display.
    Ah, now THAT makes sense! They have good commercial applications. Thanks Spongie. (y)
    Reply