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Adata Switches NAND on XPG SX8200 Pro SSD Again, Affecting Performance (Updated)

XPG SX8200 Pro
XPG SX8200 Pro (Image credit: Adata)

Update 2/18/2020: Adata has reached to clarify that the Redditor measured performance with the new SSD configuration connected to the PCH and compared performance to the originally-shipping SSD connected to the CPU. This can have an impact on performance. We have also added a note regarding the disparity in the relevant section. Adata does not dispute that there is now another configuration shipping to customers.

Updated Article:

A report has emerged that Adata has altered its XPG SX8200 Pro again by swapping in SK Hynix flash, making this the fourth known SSD configuration. As before, Adata ships this drive with the same model number as the original SSD. 

Adata’s XPG SX8200 Pro was once hailed as the best SSD in its category in terms of offering the best bang for your buck. Unfortunately, the SSD also received its fair share of bad press as Adata switched out the original components for slower parts, without publicizing the change. While swapping out different types of flash certainly isn't unheard of, Adata's tactic involved swapping the SSD controller, a first. In addition to the original SX8200 Pro, our testing identified two more revisions that delivered substantially lower performance than the original SSD. 

Now it appears that Adata has quietly revamped the SX8200 Pro again. Redditor svartchimpans recently purchased an SX8200 Pro that doesn't match the specs of any previous revisions we've tested. That means there could now be a total of four different variants of the SX8200 Pro. However, given the timeframe, we don't expect to find the original SX8200 Pro anymore.

As a quick recap, the original SX8200 Pro had a Silicon Motion SM2262ENG SSD controller clocked at 650 MHz with IMFT 64-layer TLC (triple-level cell) NAND. The other versions shipped with the slower Silicon Motion SM2262G controller at 575 MHz. 

The type of NAND you received varied depending on the SSD lottery. Some arrived with Micron 96-layer TLC NAND, while others came with Samsung 64-layer TLC NAND. The fourth and latest variant reportedly retained the SM2262G controller but used SK Hynix's 96-layer TLC NAND.

Adata XPG SX8200 Pro Revisions

ProductControllerSSD Controller ClockNANDFlash Interface Speed
Adata XPG SX8200 Pro v1SM2262ENG650 MHzIMFT 64L TLC 650 MTps
Adata XPG SX8200 Pro v2SM2262G575 MHzMicron 96L TLC650 MTps
Adata XPG SX8200 Pro v3SM2262G575 MHzSamsung 64L TLC525 MTps
Adata XPG SX8200 Pro v4SM2262G?SK Hynix 96L TLC?
Adata XPG SX8200 Pro v5SM2262ENG?SanDisk 96L TLC?

The Redditor purchased his three SX8200 Pro 2TB drives at the same retailer with the same product number at different points in time. Because the model number is always listed as "SX8200 Pro," there really is no way of finding out which variant you're buying until you actually have the drive in your hands and benchmark it. 

In fairness, Adata doesn't guarantee a specific SSD controller or type of flash for its SX8200 Pro. That's understandable, because companies don't always have access to all the original components to manufacture their products, and sometimes it's necessary to use substitutes. 

For reference, the SX8200 Pro is rated for sequential read and write speeds up to 3,500 MBps and 3,000 MBps, respectively, and random read and write speeds up to 390,000 IOPS and 380,000 IOPS.

[Update: Adata has reached to clarify that the Redditor measured performance with the new SSD configuration connected to the PCH and compared performance to the originally-shipping SSD connected to the CPU. This can have an impact on performance and may inflate the performance delta between the two drives. As such, we have removed the screenshots of the test Redditor's test results and relevant text until further data is provided. Adata does not dispute that there is now another configuration shipping to customers.]

Synthetic benchmarks don't always paint the entire picture, and we would need to thoroughly test the new revision to see if it is slower than the other three variants. 

Performance is just one side of the coin, though. It remains to be seen whether the new NAND will impact the SX8200 Pro's endurance. The SX8200 Pro is available in 256GB, 512GB, 1TB, and 2TB capacities. Adata rated the original drives with endurance ratings of 160TBW, 320TBW, 640TBW and 1,280TBW. Given that Adata hasn't modified these values in the specification sheet, we can only assume that the SK Hynix drives should be as durable as the original ones. [Update: Adata has clarified that the endurance rating remains the same.]

  • Makaveli
    Yuck, I would never buy anything from Adata in the past, this will guarantee that I won't in the future, and to tell friends not to buy.

    Switching the NAND and not rebrading the product its a A** Move Adata I hope you lose many sales because of it.
    Reply
  • Giroro
    "...latest revision is purportedly 30.8% percent slower in sequential read speed than the previous revision, and it also takes a 16.7% haircut in sequential write performance "

    "According to the Redditor's results, however, the SX8200 Pro with Samsung 64-layer NAND (the previous revision) delivered up to 30.8% and 16.7% higher sequential read and write speeds than the latest variant that comes with SK Hynix 96-layer NAND. "

    So is the new one ~30% slower, or is the old one ~30% faster? Those calculations are not equivalent.
    For example, 2000MBps would be 33% slower than 3000MBps. But 3000MBps is 50% faster than 2000MBps.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    Giroro said:
    So is the new one ~30% slower, or is the old one ~30% faster? Those calculations are not equivalent.
    For example, 2000MBps would be 33% slower than 3000MBps. But 3000MBps is 50% faster than 2000MBps.
    trivialities.

    "Adata ships this drive with the same model number as the original SSD "
    Slower is slower, and trying to gain the same revenue.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    I have the original one, which I bought ages ago for my 3700X build and it performs exactly as benchmarked on this website. Really bad look for Adata that it isn't relabelling these "refreshes" with different product numbers when the hardware has obviously been drastically altered from the original version. It's now impossible to recommend this drive unfortunately, since you have no idea what you're buying.
    Reply
  • jpe1701
    I was going to get the xpg s70 soon too but I'm not sure I want to give them my money now. I am wondering if hp has done something similar with the ex950 too because my 1tb drive has never been as fast as reviews and some other people have drives that are as fast and others are like mine with about a 700MBps difference in reads and writes as compared to reviewers. Hp doesn't actually support them in the US, it's handled by a distributor but I forget their name. I had to go to the amazon page and only then it was just luck that the name of the company handling support was there because it was in a review by a person complaining of the slower speed. I was able to find a review that had a slower drive but of course hp sent them a beta firmware update that made it work better but guess what? It is nowhere to be found online. Lol.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    This is a bad move from Adata which will erode any confidence in their product that they managed to build up over the years. The SX8xxx series SSDs are actually one of the highly recommended NVME SSDs, but since they quietly switched the NAND controller last year, I feel its no longer one of the drives that people buy anymore. This does not apply to the SX 8200 series, but going forward, I won't even consider Adata when getting a SSD since I really don't know what I will be getting. For people like me who are already using the SX 8200, if the drive fails, then there is a good chance we will get back a slower drive when we RMA it.

    In my opinion, they don't produce the NAND nor the controller. So they may be forced to change them because of the lack of supply. But trying to sneak it into the existing product with no indication is clearly a sly business decision. They should have created a new model so that people know the difference.
    Reply
  • wckuan
    Admin said:
    The fourth revision of Adata's popular XPG SX8200 Pro SSD has emerged in the wild.

    Adata Switches NAND on XPG SX8200 Pro SSD Again, Affecting Performance : Read more

    There could be alot more variant than you know.

    Here is my 1TB and 2TB 8200Pro, purchased on mid of 2019 and last month respectively.
    Both using SM2262ENG, but SanDisk NAND flash found in 2TB drive, which is the 5th version in your list.

    1TB drive

    2TB drive

    CrystalDiskMark
    Reply
  • Olle P
    watzupken said:
    This is a bad move from Adata which will erode any confidence in their product...
    In my opinion, they don't produce the NAND nor the controller. So they may be forced to change them because of the lack of supply. But trying to sneak it into the existing product with no indication is clearly a sly business decision. They should have created a new model so that people know the difference.
    I agree. Right now these components are in short supply, so there's no surprise Adata is forced to use whatever is available on the market.
    When the result is a significant (negative) change in performance this should be accompanied by a change in model name, number and official performance figures.

    If the changes had resulted in >20% better performance I'm sure they wouldn't ignore it in the marketing...
    Reply
  • SethNW
    Dear lord, just how many revisions will ADATA have in news... Seriously, if this keeps going on, even Intel will get jealous with their many Skylake revisions... :-D
    Reply
  • rangerscott
    Got one from amazon back in Dec 2020. It has the SM2262ENG controller with 2015 on it. The nand chips have Adata on them. Does adata make their own nand chips?
    Reply