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Get Your Hands on an Nvidia RTX 3090 for $999, Its Lowest Ever Price: Real Deals

Real Deals
(Image credit: Future)

One of the most powerful graphics cards on the market at the moment has a huge chunk of money knocked off its current price for a limited period, or until stocks last. The Zotac Gaming GeForce RTX 3090 Trinty OC is only $999 (opens in new tab) on Woot! right now, making it almost $300 cheaper than the nearest priced RTX 3090 model. This card has a whopping 24GBs of GDDR6X VRAM — that's more than enough for any task, be it gaming or video editing.

Gigabyte's Z690 Ultra Durable AX is $189 on Amazon (opens in new tab), this is the DDR4 version of the Z690 and is a much more affordable option because the price of DDR5 is still being rather costly. 

Another great spot today is this LG UltraGear 27GP850-B 27-inch gaming monitor for $296 (opens in new tab). With a 165Hz refresh rate, 1ms GtG response time, and a QHD nano IPS display, this monitor has some very good specs for this reduced price.  

Keep scrolling for more great deals.

TL;DR — Today’s Best Deals

Today’s best deals in detail

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Zotac Gaming GeForce RTX 3090 Trinty OC GPU: was $1,399, now $999 at Woot! (opens in new tab)
One of the most powerful graphics cards available on the market, the RTX 3090 comes with a massive 24GBs of GDDR6X VRAM memory and a 384-bit memory bus. The Zotac Gaming GeForce RTX 3090 has 10496 CUDA cores that can boost to 1710 MHz clock speeds. 

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Gigabyte Z690 UD AX (DDR4) Motherboard: was $219, now $189 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
The LGA 1700 Z690 UD AX from Gigabyte has three M.2 sockets, PCIe 5.0, USB 3.2, Gen 2x2 type-C, Wi-Fi 6, and lots of thermal cooling on its VRMs. This is a feature-rich board for a great price whilst it's on sale. 

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LG UltraGear 27GP850-B 27-Inch 165Hz QHD Nano IPS Gaming Monitor: was $446, now $296 at Adorama (opens in new tab)
This impressively specced monitor from LG has a high refresh rate of 165Hz that is able to go to 180Hz when set to O/C mode, a wide DCI-P3 98% color gamut, VESA mounting, and HDR 400 certification. 

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Corsair iCUE 220T RGB Airflow ATX Case: was $124, now $79 at Newegg (opens in new tab)
This mid-tower ATX case features solid steel construction with a unique-looking cutout mesh grill at the front, three Corsair SP (Static Pressure) 120mm RGB Pro fans, and a lighting node, as well as a full PSU shroud to hide the power supply and most of you cables to give a clean-looking build.

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MSI Gaming Radeon RX 6400 GPU: was $179, now $149 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This budget graphics card - aimed at 1080p gaming - has 4GB of GDDR6 VRAM running through a 64-bit memory interface. The RX 6400 comes with 12 compute cores, and 768 GPU cores with a boost clock of 2815MHz. 

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Stewart Bendle
Deals Writer

Stewart Bendle is a deals writer at Tom's Hardware. A firm believer in “Bang for the buck” Stewart likes to research the best prices for hardware and build PCs that have a great price for performance ratio.

  • peachpuff
    Time to let Nvidia sit on inventory and let them suffer, they screwed us for two years now they can go fudge themselves.
    Reply
  • Fates_Demise
    peachpuff said:
    Time to let Nvidia sit on inventory and let them suffer, they screwed us for two years now they can go fudge themselves.
    Really? Nvidia screwed you?, exactly how did nvidia screw you. They ramped up production to provide more cards, they implemented a line of cards for miners that helped free up regular cards, they did NOT jack the original prices way up, which they could have done.
    The only thing you were screwed by was crypto currencies and yourself by not having enough insight to just buy a card and put it to work making you money. But enjoy being nieve
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    Fates_Demise said:
    they did NOT jack the original prices way up, which they could have done.
    The only reason AMD and Nvidia didn't jack up prices to the moon is because they have contract pricing with their AIBs which greatly limit their ability to alter pricing after the fact. AMD and Nvidia did jack up pricing on each subsequent SKU launches once they realized there was no apparent ceiling to how much crypto-miners were willing to pay.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    InvalidError said:
    The only reason AMD and Nvidia didn't jack up prices to the moon is because they have contract pricing with their AIBs which greatly limit their ability to alter pricing after the fact. AMD and Nvidia did jack up pricing on each subsequent SKU launches once they realized there was no apparent ceiling to how much crypto-miners were willing to pay.
    Prices on the new releases were not raised to market value. They were still getting scalped for big profits. What issue do you have with reducing scalper margins?
    Reply
  • Fates_Demise
    InvalidError said:
    The only reason AMD and Nvidia didn't jack up prices to the moon is because they have contract pricing with their AIBs which greatly limit their ability to alter pricing after the fact. AMD and Nvidia did jack up pricing on each subsequent SKU launches once they realized there was no apparent ceiling to how much crypto-miners were willing to pay.
    Yea... try again, minor adjustments to pricing was solely due to a jump in material costs from worldwide shortages on silicon and other materials.
    Not to mention contract pricing does not affect what they can personally charge for cards on thier own site to users.
    Reply
  • peachpuff
    Fates_Demise said:
    Yea... try again, minor adjustments to pricing was solely due to a jump in material costs from worldwide shortages on silicon and other materials.
    Not to mention contract pricing does not affect what they can personally charge for cards on thier own site to users.
    Right right... 2gb of extra ram on the 12gb 3080 was $500 more? Nvidia was the king of scalping the last two years.
    Reply
  • Metteec
    Anyone that thinks Nvidia screwed over gamers has misplaced their anger. Ampere cards routinely sold on the aftermarket for 25% to 100% higher than MSRP, model dependent. Over the last year, Toms provided supporting data that highlighted these price trends. In any market, a product which you can purchase and then immediately resell for a significant profit is the antithesis of “screwed” by the manufacturer. Significant demand because of inflated crypto yields and reduced supply side material, shipping and production shortages caused by the pandemic led to significant consumer price increases. A better target for your ire are the disingenuous retailers (e.g., Newegg, Bestbuy, Amazon, etc.) that allowed scalpers to purchase multiple graphics cards.

    Rest assured, market forces are working as they should. Nvidia will soon release the RTX 4000-series that promises significant performance increases. AMD is releasing a similarly situated card. Intel is now entering the fray. The crypto market is crashing; cards are widely available; price per performance is falling; and everything will soon be right with the world. It is a great time to be a gamer and most will be able to acquire a powerful graphics card for a reasonable price in the upcoming months.

    Of course, all that flies out the window if you want the RTX 4090 the day it comes out. Again, it will see high demand and likely low supply, with inflated early adopter prices, until the next big dog arrives; a vicious cycle that persists ever since the Canopus Voodoo 2 release and we were playing Quake 2 Glide.
    Reply
  • renz496
    well good for those that into semi pro stuff.
    Reply
  • sizzling
    Sitting here remembers the memes about 2080Ti owners crying over the 3070 and wondering if this going to be a repeat? :unsure:
    Reply