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Alphacool Eisbaer Pro Aurora 360 Review: Expandable Excellence

Top-notch, expandable liquid cooling for Intel and AMD HEDT and Workstation CPUs

Alphacool Eisbaer Pro Aurora 360
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

For our CPU cooling tests, we use the same hardware, overclock and configuration for every test, to minimize environment variables in testing. This allows for all results across all coolers tested on the platform to be viable as side-by-side examination for direct compare/contrast.

CPUAMD Threadripper 2990WX all 32 cores @ 3.40Ghz @ 1.20v
(3.00Ghz stock speed, single core boost @ 4.2Ghz)
MotherboardGigabyte X399 Aorus Xtreme (bios vers. 8A07BG03)
MemoryCorsair Vengeance LPX, 32GB (4x8GB) DDR4-3000
StorageCorsair MP600 m.2 2280 NVMe, 500GB
GraphicsGigabyte GTX 1050 Ti
Power Supplybe quiet! Dark Power Pro11 1200w
ChassisCorsair Graphite 760T
MonitoringCrystalFontz CFA-633-TMI-KU, 4x Dallas One Wire WR-DOW-Y17 sensors
Fan ControlCorsair Commander Pro, 100%/50% PWM Speed profiles (liquid cooling pump always @100%, if applicable)
OSWindows 10 Pro 64bit
Networking Disconnected, not used
Thermal CompoundArctic MX-4

Data comparisons are based on data collected from testing performed on our new AMD Threadripper 2990WX system, including re-visiting many previously covered products which were originally covered on the prior testing platform which pivoted around a Threadripper 1900X (4.10ghz @1.40v).

All data reported for this article has been collected on the current AMD 2990WX TR4 platform and will be maintained as like-for-like evaluation of ongoing cooling coverage. We’ve recently swapped the taller, Corsair Dominator RGB DIMMs with Corsair Vengeance LPX for lower-profile memory, allowing for higher cooler compatibility for testing.

Prime95 v29.4b8 (no AVX) is used for two-hour intervals, one managing fans at 50% PWM and the other at 100% PWM with RPM measurements being taken every 3 seconds and averaged across the duration of each 2-hour capture.  Omitting AVX instruction sets allows for accurate, 100% loads at chosen clock speeds, while allowing AVX instructions would provide higher, albeit, unrealistic synthetic CPU loads and excessive heat production, less indicative of real-world use.

This also allows for a greater range CPU coolers to be tested and compared without the need to configure the system differently for smaller coolers which may not handle the excessive thermal loads being generated during testing, while larger coolers might be better equipped to manage heat output produced by the 32 beastly cores from the 2990WX. 

HWInfo64 is used for real-time core temperature readout, thermal throttling alerts, motherboard power consumption, CPU speed and logging of data, while a CrystalFontz CFA-633-TMI-KU is used to monitor and later average both ambient room (2 probes) and motherboard voltage regulator heatsink (2 probes).

With these temperature readings collected, CPU Core is defined as an average of all CPU core temperatures reported once per second for the entirety of the testing run from HWInfo64 data. This value is then taken as an offset difference from the reported ambient room temperature collected from the CFA-633-TMI-KU (also once per second and averaged). CPU PWM is defined by the voltage regulator heatsink direct temperature probe as an offset different from the same reported ambient room temperature reading for the same CPU Core test (100%, 50%). This helps define a working model of how well the evaluated cooler performs as a process of also cooling nearby hardware under loads, like our overclocked motherboard voltage regulator heatsink.

  • pixelpusher220
    Maybe it's me, but does the 'fill port' being directly on top of the CPU make anyone else a wee bit nervous?

    Happily admit I've not done any water cooling, but I assumed filling would happen at the reservoir and/or that the reservoir wouldn't sit directly on the CPU.
    Reply
  • rubix_1011
    I've watercooled for 19+ years and the reality is that care and patience should always be the utmost priority. If coolant drips or spills, it isn't the end of the world, clean up the spill and ensure that components are 100% dried before ever attempting to turn a system on. Using canned air, paper towels, cotton swabs and even hair dryers and fans help out. I would avoid excessive heat like from ovens or things of that nature.

    You could technically submerge your entire PC in water and as long as it dries completely before power is switched on, you should not see any issue. I've had people tell me their computer had been rained on (window left open) and it was shot. Let it dry out over several days, monitor and system were each fine once water was gone.
    Reply
  • pixelpusher220
    rubix_1011 said:
    I've watercooled for 19+ years and the reality is that care and patience should always be the utmost priority. If coolant drips or spills, it isn't the end of the world, clean up the spill and ensure that components are 100% dried before ever attempting to turn a system on. Using canned air, paper towels, cotton swabs and even hair dryers and fans help out. I would avoid excessive heat like from ovens or things of that nature.

    You could technically submerge your entire PC in water and as long as it dries completely before power is switched on, you should not see any issue. I've had people tell me their computer had been rained on (window left open) and it was shot. Let it dry out over several days, monitor and system were each fine once water was gone.
    Appreciate the reply! I think my brain was thinking you'd be 'topping up' but now that seems like not the most common use case.

    I also now imagine that rather than filling the system with it 'installed', you'd fill this prior to installation of the cpu/heatsink/reservoir? I guess the movements involved in installation aren't enough to dislodge the tubing (with or without this systems 'dripless' concept).
    Reply
  • rubix_1011
    Correct, just taking it out of the box and installing it does not require fluid addition or filling. This would only be when expanding the system with additional components and you'd need to top off the system to allow the loop to be as full as possible with coolant. When it comes to liquid cooling PC components, you certainly do not want the pumps to run dry or be low on coolant as this can cause permanent damage.
    Reply