BenQ Mobiuz EX3210U 4K Monitor Review: Big Screen, Big Color, Better HDR Contrast

The BenQ Mobiuz EX3210U is a 32-inch IPS, 4K Gaming Monitor with 144 Hz, Adaptive-Sync, HDR600 and extended color.

BenQ EX3210U
Editor's Choice
(Image: © BenQ)

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Some Mobiuz monitors I’ve tested can’t be improved with calibration. The EX3210U can be used without adjustment, but a few tweaks positively impact image quality.

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

Our grayscale and gamma tests use Calman calibration software from Portrait Displays. We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

In the RPG mode, the default color temp preset is called Normal, and it delivers on that promise. It’s fairly close to D65 with just a little elevation in blue. This error is visible but hard to spot in most content. What is more obvious is the skewed gamma which shows dark areas in the 90% brightness region. This is where most highlight detail resides, and the EX3210U mutes that somewhat.

In the Custom picture mode, I could adjust the RGB sliders to near perfection along with changes to the Light Tuner control. That flattens gamma tracking to a more reasonable point. Highlight detail is much more visible and pops nicely. These adjustments also improve color saturation which was already prodigious.

If you want the sRGB gamut, that mode is available with decent grayscale tracking and a flatter gamma run. Shadow detail is abundant but a little light in tone. Overall, this is a very usable mode for color-critical work and SDR gaming.

Comparisons

Though the EX3210U is at the bottom of the out-of-box grayscale comparison, it’s still close to the calibration-not-needed level. You can enjoy this monitor without adjustment, but it’s well worth making a few changes. Those tweaks put the BenQ in third place. Gamma tracking is a bit more off the mark, but again, careful adjustment makes an improvement. The range of values is relatively high, but since errors exist on both sides of the 2.2 line, the average value is close at 2.26 actual. In my experience, it’s always better if gamma is off to the high side. That prevents the picture from washing out.

Color Gamut Accuracy

Our color gamut and volume testing use Portrait Displays’ Calman software. For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

The place where few monitors can touch the EX3210U is color saturation. It has a huge gamut, large enough that I term it a Rec.2020 screen. The main difference between that spec and DCI-P3 is the hue tracking for green. DCI green is much more yellow than 2020 green. BenQ is clearly aiming for the latter here. Though there is slight under-saturation in general, this monitor will produce vivid and bold shades for all content both SDR and HDR.

Calibration brings the hue errors under control and increases overall saturation. It’s obviously well worth doing. The sRGB gamut is slightly under-saturated with the blue white point I noted before. However, it’s close enough for critical apps and SDR content.

Comparisons

That any monitor finishes fifth with a 2.52dE color error means that group contains very competent screens. The EX3210U has exemplary color volume and accuracy for sure. And you can see in the gamut volume chart that it has more coverage than just about any other monitor out there. Only the MSI and ViewSonic have a tiny bit more color, which you are unlikely to see in a live comparison. The BenQ is qualified for precise work in the sRGB and Rec.2020 gamuts.

Christian Eberle
Contributing Editor

Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.

  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    You had me until $1000.
    Reply
  • helper800
    Considering the price of these bigger 4k 120-165hz IPS monitors I think it's almost always better to get an OLED of some kind in its place. OLED is so much better looking than IPS or MVA panels and they can be just as accurate with the colors and have competing viewing angles. The new QD-OLED panels that Samsung uses are the cream of the crop as far as panel technology. I dont understand how these companies sell these 900+ dollar non-OLED panel monitors...
    Reply
  • gallovfc
    Too big... I'd have to get rid of the secondary monitor...
    28" is already the limit...
    Reply
  • helper800
    gallovfc said:
    Too big... I'd have to get rid of the secondary monitor...
    28" is already the limit...
    I thought the same about greater than 27 inch monitors, but I have grown more and more in love with my 31.5 inch 4k Samsung monitor.
    Reply
  • geok1ng
    You had me until the responde time chart. Judging from the image, 6ms on the MSI is 75% faster than 7ms on the other monitors. I remember a time when graphs helped us to faster understand a content. Now i must triple check numbers and Fine print before coming up to a conclusion about a graph.
    Reply
  • Abhishek981
    I read reviews on this monitor. I saw that some users have returned this product due to a dead pixel at the middle of the screen.

    I want to confirm, if the monitor has this problem or not, if someone is using this.
    Reply