Skip to main content

EVGA 650W N1 Power Supply Review

Affordable, but unimpressive.

EVGA 650W N1
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

Performance Rating

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Low overall performance, only a bit higher than the EVGA 600 W1. 

Noise Rating

The graph below depicts the cooling fan's average noise over the PSU's operating range, with an ambient temperature between 30 to 32 degrees Celsius (86 to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

This is a noisy PSU, so you should keep this in mind before you decide to buy it. 

Efficiency Rating

The following graph shows the PSU's average efficiency throughout its operating range with an ambient temperature close to 30 degrees Celsius.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Bottom low average efficiency. The outdated platform is the problem here. 

Power Factor Rating

The following graph shows the PSU's average power factor reading throughout its operating range with an ambient temperature close to 30 degrees Celsius.

AVG PF

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

A section where it performs decently! The average PF score is quite high. 

MORE: Best Power Supplies

MORE: How We Test Power Supplies

MORE: All Power Supply Content

  • Archaic59
    Just another POS on the endless pile that we have to warn people about. Who could even use it? It's not for a gaming system and how many people really need 650 watts in a home office system? I remember when I used to recommend EVGA power supplies regularly. Yeah, the Super Flower days, which are long gone. RIP EVGA.
    Reply
  • DSzymborski
    In fairness, even when EVGA had PSUs made by Super Flower and SeaSonic, the N series still totally sucked then as well.
    Reply
  • greatmaharg
    To be clear, is this a review for the 80+ White rated W1, or unrated N1?
    Reply
  • maxamillionfeettall
    "EVGA states that the PSU's fan has a sleeve bearing, but I broke it apart and found an inferior rifle bearing."

    Rifle bearing is just a modified sleeve bearing and is superior to plain sleeve bearings iirc. It's even stated in the psu 101 article, so idk why it's stated as inferior to plain sleeve bearing this time around.
    Reply