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SilverStone Strider Titanium ST60F-TI PSU Review

SilverStone released its first Titanium PSU series, which is made by Enhance Electronics. The smallest Strider Titanium unit will be under our scope today. Besides high efficiency it also offers compact dimensions and a fully modular cable design.

Transient Response Tests

Advanced Transient Response Tests

For details on our transient response testing, please click here.

Ιn these tests, we monitor the response of the PSU in two different scenarios. First, a transient load (10A at +12V, 5A at 5V, 5A at 3.3V and 0.5A at 5VSB) is applied for 200ms while the PSU works at 20 percent load. In the second scenario, the PSU is hit by the same transient load while operating at 50 percent load. In both tests, we use our oscilloscope to measure the voltage drops caused by the transient load. The voltages should remain within the ATX specification's regulation limits.

These metrics are crucial because they simulate the transient loads a PSU is likely to handle (such as booting a RAID array or an instant 100 percent load of CPU/GPUs). We call them "Advanced Transient Response Tests," and they are designed to be very tough to master, especially for PSUs with less than 500W capacity.

Advanced Transient Response at 20 Percent

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V11.895V11.762V1.12%Pass
5V5.003V4.902V2.02%Pass
3.3V3.341V3.212V3.86%Pass
5VSB4.981V4.911V1.41%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50 Percent

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V11.876V11.737V1.17%Pass
5V4.981V4.886V1.91%Pass
3.3V3.318V3.195V3.71%Pass
5VSB4.951V4.906V0.91%Pass
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In both tests, we like to see deviations within 1 percent on the +12V rail. However, it seems as though the pursuit of Titanium-class efficiency didn't allow this. As a general rule, low switching frequencies offer better efficiency but not as good transient response. On the other hand, high switching frequencies enable smaller components, lower production costs and improved transient response. Efficiency suffers though, since energy losses are proportional to the frequency.

The 5V and 5VSB rails have low voltage drops in both cases, while the 3.3V rail drops below 3.2V during the second test. That doesn't look good coming from a high-end PSU like this one.

Here are the oscilloscope screenshots we took during Advanced Transient Response Testing:

Transient Response At 20 Percent Load

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Transient Response At 50 Percent Load

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Turn-On Transient Tests

In the next set of tests, we measure the PSU's response in simpler transient load scenarios—during its power-on phase.

For the first measurement, we turn off the PSU, dial in the maximum current the 5VSB can output and switch on the PSU. In the second test, we dial the maximum load the +12V can handle and start the PSU while it's in standby mode. In the last test, while the PSU is completely switched off (we cut off the power or switch off the PSU by flipping its on/off switch), we dial the maximum load the +12V rail can handle before switching on the PSU from the loader and restoring power. The ATX specification states that recorded spikes on all rails should not exceed 10 percent of their nominal values (+10 percent for 12V is 13.2V, and 5.5V for 5V).

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There is a tiny voltage overshoot at 5VSB and some small waves in the second test. The waveform in the third test is almost perfect, though. Overall, we observe good performance.

Aris Mpitziopoulos
Aris Mpitziopoulos is a Contributing Editor at Tom's Hardware US, covering PSUs.