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Gigabyte Demos G-Power for GTX Titan, Adds VRMs

Some manufacturers are finding ways to modify the GTX Titan while still abiding to Nvidia's terms for card design. Gigabyte is not the first to release an accessory for the GTX Titan, but it is the first to alter the PCB design (sort of). It is called the Gigabyte G-Power, as Chinese site Expreview reports.

The standard PCB design of the GTX Titan is good, but it can be done better. To improve overclocking, Gigabyte has created a secondary PCB which packs a 6+1 phase VRM design. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the GTX Titan by soldering it to a number of points on the GTX Titan PCB. The idea has been seen before in EVGA's EPower and Asus' Matrix PWM.

The device needs an 8-pin EPS connector as well as a 24-pin ATX connector, which might make it a bit unpractical for practical use.

As a result of the added VRMs, the GTX Titan should suffer from much less vdroop during extreme overclocking, which should, in theory, make higher overclocks possible, or even stable.

It remains unclear on how Gigabyte intends to market the device, if at all, but hopefully we'll know soon enough!

Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He reviews cases, water cooling and pc builds.

  • laststop311
    I could see this maybe doing ok if it was run off a pci-e power cable not a 24 ATX + 8 EPS almost all normal consumer PSU's only provide 1 of each of these and it goes into the motherboard.
    Reply
  • xomm
    10712305 said:
    I could see this maybe doing ok if it was run off a pci-e power cable not a 24 ATX + 8 EPS almost all normal consumer PSU's only provide 1 of each of these and it goes into the motherboard.

    I hope you realize this is for the extreme overclocking crowd, not the mass market...
    Reply
  • djackson_dba
    "unpractical" is not a very cromulent word.
    Reply
  • CrArC
    10712319 said:
    10712305 said:
    I could see this maybe doing ok if it was run off a pci-e power cable not a 24 ATX + 8 EPS almost all normal consumer PSU's only provide 1 of each of these and it goes into the motherboard.

    I hope you realize this is for the extreme overclocking crowd, not the mass market...

    I doubt running multiple PSUs in tandem (something which is generally considered a Bad Idea) is really an attractive option for the extreme overclocking crowd, either.
    Reply
  • xomm
    10715866 said:
    10712319 said:
    10712305 said:
    I could see this maybe doing ok if it was run off a pci-e power cable not a 24 ATX + 8 EPS almost all normal consumer PSU's only provide 1 of each of these and it goes into the motherboard.

    I hope you realize this is for the extreme overclocking crowd, not the mass market...

    I doubt running multiple PSUs in tandem (something which is generally considered a Bad Idea) is really an attractive option for the extreme overclocking crowd, either.

    Clearly, you haven't seen extreme yet. I'm talking about the LN2 crowd - up with k|ngp|n and TiN and all those guys - not TEC or phase change. (though those do require extra PSUs for the cooling subsystem anyways, just not on the boards themselves).
    Reply