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Intel Arc A380 Graphics Card Listing Shows Up On Newegg

ASRock Arc A380 Challenger
(Image credit: Newegg)

Newegg has officially showcased its first Arc A380 GPU listing (opens in new tab), the first US listing we've seen. The GPU goes on sale on August 22nd for a price of $139.99. This represents the first A380 listing we've seen outside of China, where the GPU originally launched, giving more people a chance to try out Intel's new discrete GPUs. Not that we expect it to be one of the best graphics cards, though the AV1 encoding support might be worth something to some people.

Unfortunately, this doesn't mean we have an official launch window for the rest of Intel's Arc models just yet. Only the Arc A380 has been shown, which was launched in China already. All Intel has done is moved its A380 shipments outside of China.

On the bright side, it appears Intel's confidence is growing with its Arc Alchemist GPU architecture, or at least the A380 variant. We're working to get our hands on a card for review and will be posting our findings, using the latest available drivers, as soon as possible. In theory, Intel wouldn't release the A380 in the United States if there were still groundbreaking bugs needing to be dealt with. Alternatively, A380 is borked so badly that it may never work well enough to warrant further delays. Take your pick.

The card in question is the ASRock Challenger, representing one of the few A380 models we've seen outside of the Gunnir Photon. In contrast to the Gunnir's dual fan design, the ASRock Challenger features a compact single fan cooler design with a matte black finish. The Challenger comes with three DisplayPort 2.0 ports and a single HDMI 2.0b port.

At a price of $139.99, the A380 Challenger is actually competitive in the budget-GPU landscape, slightly undercutting the RX 6400. According to third-party reviews of the A380 (like from Gamers Nexus), the A380 can match the RX 6400, and oftentimes beat it depending on the title. So the GPU can provide a decent value for the money, in the right circumstances.

But circumstances are everything with Intel's Arc GPUs right now. Driver bugs surrounding the GPU cause performance issues as well as some incompatibility problems, and Intel's driver development staff has been working feverishly to fix things. The Arc A380 can deliver RX 6500 XT levels of performance in some games, but get destroyed by the RX 6400 in others — especially older titles running on DX11.

Buyers should be fully aware of Arc's current pitfalls before purchasing. At its current $139 price point, the A380 looks reasonably competitive in the GPU space, but budget cards are typically very poor values to begin with. For instance, the GTX 1630 costs $179 (opens in new tab), while the far superior GTX 1650 Super costs $199 (opens in new tab), but that in turn pales in comparison to the RTX 2060 for just $229 (opens in new tab). Be careful what you buy, in other words, or you just might get exactly what you pay for: a cheap, underperforming GPU.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • -Fran-
    Cheapest GPU with hardware encoder for AV1 that exists! It may not always work, but when it does, it'll be glorious!

    Heh.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    -Fran- said:
    Cheapest GPU with hardware encoder for AV1 that exists! It may not always work, but when it does, it'll be glorious!
    And a full complement of four display outputs instead of only two for Navi24 and three for most of Nvidia's entry-level.

    As long as the A380 can run Warcraft, that is probably good enough for me. Based on some random guy on YT, the A380 apparently does WoW slightly better than the RX6500.

    but budget cards are typically very poor values to begin with.
    Historically, many of the best bang-per-buck GPUs were in the $150-250 range until AMD and Nvidia decided to tell the sub-$300 market to go forth and fornicate with itself..
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    InvalidError said:
    And a full complement of four display outputs instead of only two for Navi24 and three for most of Nvidia's entry-level.

    As long as the A380 can run Warcraft, that is probably good enough for me. Based on some random guy on YT, the A380 apparently does WoW slightly better than the RX6500.


    Historically, many of the best bang-per-buck GPUs were in the $150-250 range until AMD and Nvidia decided to tell the sub-$300 market to go forth and fornicate with itself..
    And I said: when it works, it'll be glorious! xD

    Regards.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    Checked Newegg and it's "backordered"...;) Intel really needs to get these out of the door or else stop dropping publicity about it until they can get these out to reviewers and start shipping them.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    waltc3 said:
    Checked Newegg and it's "backordered"...;) Intel really needs to get these out of the door or else stop dropping publicity about it until they can get these out to reviewers and start shipping them.
    In the drivers and software's current state, I doubt Intel wants to put Alchemist in reviewers' hands. Can't stop them from buying their own though. At this point, Alchemist is so far behind schedule on launch and performance, Intel will probably end up stealth-launching it to clear inventory of existing chips, do a limited run beyond that to allow AIBs who tooled up to clear their parts inventory and that might be it until Battlemage.
    Reply