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Thermaltake Intros RGB Water 3.0 Coolers, Black Opaque Coolant

In addition to new power supplies and cases, Thermaltake also introduced a few new cooling products at CES this year. These include a handful of new all-in-one liquid coolers along with a new black version of its opaque coolant.

RGB All-in-One Liquid Cooler? Yes Please

Among the new all-in-one liquid coolers are the new Water 3.0 Riing Red 140 and 280 and the Water 3.0 Riing RGB 280. In short, these are simply the existing variants of the Water 3.0 units with new Riing Red or RGB fans.

The radiators of all the units are 27mm thick, and aside from the lighting differences, the fans all have identical spec sheets. They’ll spin at speeds between 800–1,500RPM in standard PWM mode, and 400–1000RPM in low-noise mode. Noise will be between 18.5-26.4dBA and push 22.14-40.6CFM of air while generating 0.57–2.01mm of static pressure.

The RGB variant also comes with a separate module to manage the LED lighting.

And Black Opaque Coolant

If custom liquid cooling is more your thing, though, you'll perhaps be glad to know that Thermaltake finally introduced a black variant of its C1000 opaque coolant, expanding the selection to eight colors in total.

The C1000 coolant is compatible with copper, aluminum, brass, and nickel-based water blocks, and it's also fully biodegradable.

Thermaltake did not say when the products would be available, nor did it give any indication of pricing on the liquid coolers. We presume they’ll carry a premium over the standard Water 3.0 units–the Riing 14 RGB fans don’t come cheap.

  • nzalog
    Revolutionary, RGB lights are the biggest innovation of 2017 apparently.
    Reply
  • Tanyac
    Indeed, It seems lots of vendors have run out of ideas for real productivity improvements. The focus seems to be more on whether it looks good, not whether it works. Not only hardware manufacturers, but even program designers, who these days are more concerned with aesthetics than getting the job done.

    It boggles the mind :)
    Reply
  • JackNaylorPE
    It seems odd that the decision makers (marketing folks) think investing in bling rather then eliminating the mixed metals / galvanic corrosion issue, weak pump issue and getting rid of an aluminum radiator is "innovation".
    Reply
  • memadmax
    Can't wait for the rgb lighting and win10 fad to be over...

    Once it finally breaks, the cold hard reality will kick in: This stuff is garbage...
    Reply
  • ohim
    RGB on everything ... and that black opaque coolant is amazing, i mean.. why nobody has ever thought of installing black tubing in their computers, better make a black coolant ... What is wrong with people these days ?

    RGB leds on everything is the equivalent of WORD Art in office back in the 90s and early 2000.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    19126847 said:
    It seems odd that the decision makers (marketing folks) think investing in bling rather then eliminating the mixed metals / galvanic corrosion issue, weak pump issue and getting rid of an aluminum radiator is "innovation".

    As soon as corrosion starts killing the RGB lights, that's when money gets spent on fixing the problem.
    Reply
  • buzznut
    Its expensive, but Thermaltake's C1000 line is easily the best coolant I have ever worked with. So this is cool, I have red, blue, and yellow and they mix well; White and black are next on my list.
    Reply
  • RomeoReject
    19126847 said:
    It seems odd that the decision makers (marketing folks) think investing in bling rather then eliminating the mixed metals / galvanic corrosion issue, weak pump issue and getting rid of an aluminum radiator is "innovation".
    You're comparing throwing some lights on something to trying to overcome the forces of nature via chemistry? Those are nowhere near equal tasks. If it were easily solved, it would already be solved.
    Reply
  • tman247
    No question, VR will appeal to gamers - that's logical. For everyone else though, it's all very 'meh'. For 5 minutes, it's mildly interesting, but certainly not worth the investment. AR is very similar, but probably has markets in medical, construction and architecture amongst others. Again, far from mainstream.

    I give it 2 years, and it will start to die off - probably the same way consumer 3D TV's have.
    Reply