Dell UP2715K 27-inch 5K Monitor Review

Users have barely warmed up to 4K (Ultra HD) displays but that hasn't stopped Dell from introducing a 5K monitor: the UP2715K. With professional cred and a factory calibration, we explore what you get for its premium price tag.

Ultra HD monitors have been available for a couple of years now but they still occupy a relatively small niche in the marketplace. The vast majority of users are still looking at 1920x1080 pixel screens in sizes of 24 inches or less. One might think a 3840x2560 resolution would have become more common before technology moved on to an even higher pixel count. But of course we enthusiasts know better. Just when you thought manufacturers couldn't fit any more dots on the panel, well, they found a way.

Recently we reviewed our first 5K display, HP's Z27q. Its wide gamut and other attributes aim it squarely at professionals and early-adopters. But we found a few flaws not unexpected in such an early example of the tech. We figured it wouldn't be long before other companies jumped on to the bandwagon. Enter Dell and its UP2715K.

Specifications

MORE: Best Computer Monitors
MORE: Display Calibration 101

MORE: The Science Behind Tuning Your Monitor
MORE: All Monitor Content

Dell usually does a good job of presenting a first-generation product that's finished and ready for prime time. Purchasers of the UP2715K will not have to serve as beta testers. They will, however, have to pony up a fair amount of cash, though not as much as they did for the first Ultra HD monitors. The Z27q can now be found for under $1000, but this new Dell is a bit more expensive. However, you do get a little more in the bargain.

The panel is an LG-sourced AH-IPS part with a white LED backlight and a 10-bit native color depth. Getting a 10-bit signal to the UP2715K will require a high-end Nvidia Quadro or AMD FirePro video card. Even the GeForce Titan X we used in our test system could only transmit 8 bits of color information but it did work at full resolution. You'll also need dual DisplayPort outputs of the version 1.2 variety. Dell has a list of cards on their website that have been certified to work.

Another factor to consider is the size of fonts and icons. Windows 7 with its awful dpi scaling won't do this monitor justice. With version 8.1 or later running however, setting the scaling to at least 150 percent makes things readable on the 27-inch screen. Dell thoughtfully provides a printed instruction sheet explaining how to perform this tweak.

Feature-wise the UP2715K is pro all the way. Not only do you get a comprehensive OSD with color management and two-point grayscale control, Dell includes a software auto-calibration app that works with X-Rite instruments like the i1Pro and i1DisplayPro. With this tool you can create two preset memories in the OSD, which can be combined with the existing picture modes giving the user a dizzying array of choices. We'll explain everything during the benchmark tests and there is a lot to cover.

The UP2715K and its 218ppi pixel density is certainly cutting-edge on paper. Let's see how it measures up.

Create a new thread in the US Reviews comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
19 comments
Comment from the forums
    Your comment
  • Logen_
    On the specifications chart, it says that the panel is AMVA, but a little below the chart, it's mentioned that it's an IPS panel instead. Going by the conclusion and contrast ratio, definitely IPS. Also, 3 year warranty, that's.... so little for something that clearly deserves a 5 year or more, in my opinion.
    3
  • ceberle
    Quote:
    On the specifications chart, it says that the panel is AMVA, but a little below the chart, it's mentioned that it's an IPS panel instead. Going by the conclusion and contrast ratio, definitely IPS. Also, 3 year warranty, that's.... so little for something that clearly deserves a 5 year or more, in my opinion.


    It is indeed AH-IPS not AMVA. Thanks for pointing out our error.

    -Christian-
    0
  • huilun02
    Oh look its a retina display with retina pricetag
    0
  • Jeff_53
    Why isn't the MSRP on the first or last page? My interest in the product and features is directly tied to it's price.
    5
  • apertotes
    That contrast... ugh! For 99% of users, contrast is much more important than color fidelity.
    0
  • theusual
    How about a test of the DELL S2716DG? Especiall vs the ASUS ROG PG279Q.
    0
  • theusual
    Quote:
    How about a test of the DELL S2716DG? Especiall vs the ASUS ROG PG279Q.

    Never mind. That would be TN vs IPS. You could compare it to the PG278Q though.
    0
  • CBender
    + for the price thing. It is absolutely irritating. Hope you guys fix this.
    1
  • PellehDin
    If they fix the price issue - and the current price is about $1,500 and up - you might just skip the article, which they don't want.
    3
  • CBender
    I don't read the review articles just because of that. I am going to read a full review for a product not that I can't afford, but a product that I consider it be way overpriced (not for this particular review)
    0
  • TallestJon96
    I know I'm a gamer who's out of place in a professional work monitor article, but between the low response time, and you statement that you could play at 40fps, id love to see an article about gaming at 5k, particularly with titan x vs 980 ti benches
    2
  • cats_Paw
    Well, I guess we needed higher resolution to keep "can it run crysis" alive.
    4
  • Anonymous
    It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.
    -2
  • Uri___Pisarev
    Quote:
    If they fix the price issue - and the current price is about $1,500 and up - you might just skip the article, which they don't want.



    I have a Dell U3415W, a 34 inch Ultrawide. Price on it was also $1.5K and it did not move, but during the holiday season it fell to $700.

    So if you are interested in a product don't just give up because you can't afford it, it can easily fall into your price range as long as you have reasonable expectations.
    1
  • Uri___Pisarev
    Quote:
    It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.


    I had a 24 inch monitor and switched to a 32 inch TV and later to a 34 inch monitor.

    I have to say, you can never go back in size ever again. I would not even look at 27 inch.
    0
  • mrmez
    Quote:
    It is cool to see they are pushing 5k and what not but it is absulutely useless for PC on 27". The only perfect resolution right now is 2K 144Hz, everything over that is waste.


    Maybe if you've got poor eyesight, just want to game or have a sub 25" panel.
    I switched from 1440 to 5k ~18 months ago (both 27"), and the difference is amazing.
    Remember this is a pro grade screen for pro users. What matters to them is colour range and accuracy. Refresh rate means almost nothing.
    1
  • lip008
    At $1500 I would just buy a refurbished iMac. I know this monitor will outlast the hardware within the iMac. Others may want to run a machine that is more capable than an iMac, but it's interesting to me how an AIO can sometimes be the same price or cheaper than just the monitor. The 5k iMac maxes out at 4k running Windows the last time I checked though.
    0
  • zodiacfml
    Something's amiss. How is it possible to achieve 100 percent Adobe RGB while just using W-LED backlighting?
    0
  • zodiacfml
    Never mind. The capability seems pretty standard on 5K displays.

    Quote:
    Something's amiss. How is it possible to achieve 100 percent Adobe RGB while just using W-LED backlighting?
    0