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BenQ RL2460HT 24-Inch Monitor Review: Is Gaming Good At 60 Hz?

Packaging, Physical Layout, And Accessories

BenQ’s packaging is unique in that the monitor is laid flat, rather than standing upright. The contents are completely surrounded by blocks of rigid Styrofoam. All of the accessories are separated from the screen, so there’s no chance of anything coming loose.

The cable bundle includes VGA, DVI-D, and an IEC power cord. The base is also packaged separately and screws on to the upright with a captive bolt. No tools are required. Rounding out the carton is a printed Quick Start Guide and a CD-ROM with the remaining documentation and drivers.

Product 360

From head-on, the RL2460HT assumes a simple and purposeful appearance. The bezel is of average width at 22 mm on the sides and 24 mm at the top and bottom, so it will work well in a multi-screen configuration. At first glance, the lower-right corner controls look like they’re touch-sensitive. But in actuality, there are buttons hidden around the side. They click solidly and the OSD responds quickly to user input. The black plastic that makes up the chassis is of high quality and also rejects reflected light well. It doesn't easily show fingerprints, making it more ideal for a display that might be moved a lot.

The screen’s anti-glare layer is aggressive and rejects reflections extremely well. Clarity is not impacted in any noticeable way. Even though resolution is limited to FHD, pixel density in a 24-inch form factor is decent at 92 ppi.

The RL2460HT has a portrait mode that can be used for a cool three-screen desktop in first-person games. The upright also has 20 degrees of tilt, 45 degrees of swivel to either side, and 4.3 inches of height adjustment. All of the movements are precise and smooth, and the monitor stays put once you get it situated. The base is a little small. Because the whole package is so light, though, stability is not an issue.

This is a fairly slim panel. Rather than a single smooth taper from side to side, the internals are housed in a squared-off bulge. There is plenty of shielding visible through the vents that run along the top. On the side of the upright are white tick marks to use as reference when setting up at a LAN party. You’ll always be able to restore your RL2460HT to the same height that way.

Around back is a 100 mm VESA mount, which is exposed upon removing the factory upright. In the lower-right is a Kensington security lock. You can also see a little of BenQ’s trademark red trim around the base.

The inputs face downwards, as you’d expect. But BenQ molds labels into the plastic, making them a little easier to find when you’re connecting cables blindly. In addition to the single VGA and DVI connectors, there are two HDMI inputs and one output. Users who wish to record gaming sessions can hook up a recording device there, rather than capturing the stream between the PC and monitor. That way, no additional input lag is introduced.

  • blackmagnum
    Does it even matter when games automatically enable Vsync setting to 60 Hz?
    Reply
  • eldragon0
    Does it even matter when games automatically enable Vsync setting to 60 Hz?
    No, but chances are if you're dropping 300+ on a monitor and genuinely want the extra frame rate you will be the type of person who is ready and expecting to tweak the game's files to run at those frame-rates.
    Reply
  • eldragon0
    Does it even matter when games automatically enable Vsync setting to 60 Hz?
    No, but chances are if you're dropping 300+ on a monitor and genuinely want the extra frame rate you will be the type of person who is ready and expecting to tweak the game's files to run at those frame-rates.
    Reply
  • Heironious
    Yes, it matters. After buying the ASUS VG248 with Lightboost enabled in 2D gaming, I can not go back to a 60hz monitor. Is it really that hard for you to disable Vsync in the games settings?
    Reply
  • envy14tpe
    I think most mid-range gamers go 60Hz TN panel monitors that sell for $150 or less. This monitor seems pretty pricey and is stuck between those and the 144Hz monitors. I don't' think this will sell all that well.
    Reply
  • therogerwilco
    The ZR30W is 2560x1600, yet only 60 hz.

    I achieve first place in multiple games when playing multiplayer, on a regular basis.
    60hz is not the problem, the problem is your system if it CAN'T sustain 60 fps.
    Reply
  • Xivilain
    If your monitor supports 30hz, 60hz, or even 120hz, its nice to see the visual difference they make when compared side by side. I like to show other people this demo to compare FPS:
    http://frames-per-second.appspot.com/
    Reply
  • xenol
    When frame rate time periods start exceeding the fastest reaction times of humans, I start to question whether or not even faster frame rates are necessary.

    I don't think competitive players win because they have 144Hz monitors and can react with all that information being fed to them. I think they win because they are proactive, and that there are many tells anyway to allow someone who's tuned in the game to react quickly.

    I mean, StarCraft has choppy animation that is independent of refresh rates (they look like they move at 20FPS), but there's a lot of high level competition there.
    Reply
  • heydan
    Im still don´t know how people reach the 120-144 fps in any game even at 1080p, maybe they refer to fps higher than 60fps, like 70, 80, and maybe for some old games the 120-144 fps, or they play games with low settings in order to reach those fps?, can someone explain me?, because I can find any review about any high end GPU and found that there´s so little games that achieve 120-144 fps at 1080p with everything max out...
    Reply
  • tipmen
    Im still don´t know how people reach the 120-144 fps in any game even at 1080p, maybe they refer to fps higher than 60fps, like 70, 80, and maybe for some old games the 120-144 fps, or they play games with low settings in order to reach those fps?, can someone explain me?, because I can find any review about any high end GPU and found that there´s so little games that achieve 120-144 fps at 1080p with everything max out...

    You do have a point with newer games that have very nice graphics. Such as, BF, Metro LL, and Arma 3 you need a beefy GPU set up or some people turn down the settings. (Eye candy is nice but if it is going to be a slideshow it isn't worth it) However, older titles such as CS GO where having the higher FPS will give you an edge doesn't take much to get 200+ FPS. Basically computers with at least an i5 and a 6970 or 580 can hit FPS 100+ on older titles. Newer titles i5/i7 (depends on the game if it take advantage of the hyper threading) 7970(280)/290x or 680/780. Crossfire or SLI helps but I personally find the gaming experience smoother playing CS GO on one 7970 instead of two in crossfire. With one I am still well over 100 FPS. When I play BF4 I have crossfire enable and high settings with some things turned down I get over 100FPS on DX11 API. When I try mantle (When it works....) I get an extra 10fps if I am lucky and feels smoother. You also can check Toms GPU charts of even their recently released SMB. I own Asus 144hz and never can go back to playing FPS on something less. I just wish they will catch up to my golden days with the CRTs refresh rates .
    Reply