Lian Li Lancool One Digital Case Review: Old School Style With RGB Flare

Combining old school styling and just a touch of modern flare, the Lian Li Lancool One Digital ($90) can accommodate a variety of system builds. Its built-in addressable RGB lighting is compatible with most major motherboard vendors, and it even has USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C. That said, not everything is addressable rainbows and sunshine. The lack of thumbscrews, flimsy front panel and grommets that refuse to stay in their hole keep this case from achieving true greatness.

Specifications

TypeMid-Tower ATX
Motherboard SupportMini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, (E-ATX support up to 12 x 10.7 inches)
Dimensions (HxWxD)18.6 x 8.6 x 17.7 inches (472 x 220 x 450mm)
Space Above Motherboard1.5 inches (38.1mm)
Card Length16.5 inches (420mm)
CPU Cooler Height6.9 inches (175mm)
Power Supply Length8.1 inches (224mm)
Weight18.2lbs (8.25kg)
External Bays
Internal Bays2x 3.5 inches
4x 2.5 inches
Card Slots7 + 2 vertical
Ports/Jacks1x USB 3.1 Type-C
2x USB 3.0
1x audio jack
1x mic jack
1x RGB switch
OtherTempered glass side panel, addressable RGB (ARGB) lighting
Front Fans1x 120mm (Up to 3x 120mm / 2x 140mm max)
Rear Fans1x 120mm
Top Fans✗ (Up to 3x 120mm / 2x 140mm max)
Bottom Fans✗ (Up to 2x 120mm max)
Side Fans
Dampening
WarrantyOne year, limited

Exterior

Measuring 472 x 220 x 450mm (L x W x H), this steel chassis is painted black inside and out, features a tempered glass side and brushed-aluminum accent panels and weighs in at just over 18lbs.

The top of the Lancool One Digital is covered by a plastic/metal mesh panel that you can easily remove from the rear. Below it are mounting locations for three 120mm or two 140mm fans. At the front edge are a pair of USB 3.0 ports, headphone and microphone jacks, an HDD LED, an LED controller button, a power and reset button and a USB 3.1 Type-C connector.

Thin sheets of aluminum with beveled edges are affixed to the plastic front panel. Vertical vents line both sides of the fascia, extending from the top to the bottom of the chassis. A gap in the front panel between the two aluminum panels serves as an air intake port and also allows you to see the addressable RGB lighting. Removing the front panel is a simple matter of grabbing the lower edge and pulling out and away from the chassis.

The rear of the chassis is standard fare for an ATX mid-tower. It has expansion slots, an opening for a bottom-mounted PSU and an exhaust-fan mount fitted with a 120mm fan. That location features adjustable screw holes that lets you position the fan higher or lower to fine-tune airflow or make room for system components.

On the bottom of the chassis you will find a 6-inch plastic mesh filter covering the PSU's fan opening that is removable from the rear. The four large, rectangular, rubber-coated feet elevate the case approximately 0.5 inch.

The full-cover, tempered glass panel is slightly tinted. Lian Li decided against conventional rubber-coated locating pins and thumbscrews, opting instead for a tempered glass panel bonded to a metal frame (much like Cooler Master's MasterCase H500P and the NZXT H500i). The entire assembly attaches to the frame via thumbscrews in the rear. Oddly enough, the solid metal panel on the opposite side is secured with the type of thumbscrews typically used with tempered glass panels. 

The fan filtration system consists of a mix of different types of filters and does a good job preventing most dirt and dust particles from entering your system. The lift-off metal mesh filter on the top of the case is attached by magnets embedded in the edge of the filter. The full-cover filter in the front of the chassis also attaches to the frame via a magnetic seal. The nylon filter covering the PSU mounting location slides in and out from the rear of the case. Considering the rear filter measures just 6-inches-long, servicing this filter shouldn't be an issue.

MORE: Best Cases

MORE: All Case Content

Create a new thread in the US Reviews comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
1 comment
Comment from the forums
    Your comment
  • spikey in tn
    Nice case, but it sounds like someone is being too cheap to complete what they started.

    Fix the nickle-and-dime issues and charge another $5.00 for what could be a great case without any drawbacks.