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24" LCD Round-Up: Acer S242HL, Dell U2412M, And Samsung T24A550

Calibrated Performance: Color Accuracy And Gamut

As ColorEyes Display Pro explains, absolute rendering the black point produces the most numerically accurate results; this works well for high-quality monitors. But doing so could also easily generate plugged shadows (dark regions where detail is lost) on a lower-quality monitor. If matching two displays is critical, absolute rendering is the best choice, assuming both monitors can handle absolute black. Relative rendering maps the darkest values on your monitor relative to its ability to display them. This isn't as accurate, but provides detail in dark areas where your monitor has difficulty.

Since we are trying to compare the color quality between monitors, we choose to calibrate for an absolute black point. These values represent the best we can achieve with our monitors, but they add another variable to consider when judging color performance.

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Acer

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Dell

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Samsung

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Acer

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Dell

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Samsung

The range of colors doesn't change when you calibrate a monitor. A wide-gamut monitor still behaves like a wide-gamut monitor, even when you turn down brightness. However, calibration changes color perception as colors become more accurately represented.

Unlike most IPS-based displays, we're unable to achieve an average delta E below 3 with the U2412M. That's really a symptom of its cheaper e-IPS panel, which forgoes many of the color filtering technologies present in H-IPS and p-IPS in order to drive down cost. Surprisingly, Acer's S242HL bid can hit a low delta E, but this doesn't help shore up the poor contrast ratio.

After calibration, we evaluate the profile against a GretagMacBeth's color palette.

As mentioned earlier, delta E is a measure of color accuracy. But it only gives a small perspective of color performance because we interpret colors within a spectrum, not from individual points.

Absolute Color Gamut

It's harder to perceive the difference in gamut when you’re inspecting individual delta E values. With 3D images, it is best to examine the graph as a video, which is why we use Chromix's ColorThink Pro to illustrate how color gamut is affected.

The wire form outline in each video represents the total gamut volume of AdobeRGB 1998. The solid red gamut map represents the gamut of each monitor.

This is not just an examination of how one color profile maps to a reference, nor is it only about how much can be rendered (in this case AdobeRGB 1998). Rather, it's an absolute comparison of gamut volumes, which can be used to help identify strong and weak points in a color profile.

Once we inspect the 3D color gamut, the differences become clear. The U2412M does relatively well in blue and yellow production, but it's outperformed by the S242HL and T24A550 in these two specific regions. Instead, the U2412M's e-IPS panel is strong in blues, cyans, and greens at all levels. As we look to red production, the U2412M does only well in highlights, while the TN-based S242HL bid and T24A550 excel in rendering midtones and shadows.

  • austinwillis81
    kinda confused why you would be comparinig an IPS to lcd but idk
    Reply
  • fstrthnu
    I would have liked to see the older U2410 model here too, because that uses the "older" IPS technology and is apparently better enough for Dell to justify a $100 price premium over the U2412.
    Reply
  • kyuuketsuki
    austinwillis81kinda confused why you would be comparinig an IPS to lcd but idkUh, why wouldn't they?

    I currently own an eIPS monitor, and will never go back to TN.
    Reply
  • kyuuketsuki
    fstrthnuI would have liked to see the older U2410 model here too, because that uses the "older" IPS technology and is apparently better enough for Dell to justify a $100 price premium over the U2412.So… you didn't read the article? The whole point of eIPS is it's cheaper than other IPS panels, not that it's better.
    Reply
  • flong
    Dell's U2412 is NOT the replacement for the U2410. Dell is going to continue to produce the U2410.

    Also the U2410 frequently goes on sale. I think it is a mistake to buy the U2412 when the U2410 is definitely superior to the U2412 in every benchmark.

    Right now the most affordable HIPS monitors with the best performance are the Dell U2410 and the HP 2475W. I think that the HP 2475W has the edge slightly over the 2410. Asus also has put out a fairly good 24" HIPS monitor but the U2410 and the 2475W are better monitors per the professional reviews that I have read.

    I own the HP 2475W and it does have beautiful picture. You have to go to NEC at twice the cost to improve on it.
    Reply
  • kyuuketsuki
    God, really need an edit function here…

    Just reread your comment and my response was probably a little off-base. However, the U2412's predecessor should be better in every way (except possibly response time) since eIPS is meant to be more economical by trading off some of the quality of other IPS panels.
    Reply
  • flong
    KyuuketsukiGod, really need an edit function here…Just reread your comment and my response was probably a little off-base. However, the U2412's predecessor should be better in every way (except possibly response time) since eIPS is meant to be more economical by trading off some of the quality of other IPS panels.
    Hello :), I was not referring to you. The article's writer states that the U2412 is the successor of the U2410 when actually it is a more affordable IPS monitor for those with lower budgets. BTW, the article is very good; they just got this one thing wrong.

    There is a huge difference between a picture quality HIPS monitor and a TN monitor. I have not seen an eIPS monitor but they seem to be pretty good also from the reviews that I have read.
    Reply
  • Soul_keeper
    I hate touch buttons !
    Reply
  • Hello! Could you guys review the LG IPS236v? It's also a cheap IPS panel, i don't know if it's the same technology used to make the U2412M. From my researches it dosen't seem to be sold in the US, but it already arrived in other countries (in Brazil it is being sold for about $300).
    PS.: Sorry if there's any mistake with my English. =)
    Reply
  • kevith
    "...since response time and input lag usually decreases with screen size. Why? Monitors with larger screens have higher pixel density, and as the number of pixels per inch (PPI) increases there are more pixels to refresh. Therefore, at 60 Hz, larger panels take longer to complete a complete screen refresh."

    Ehr, what...?
    Reply