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Gigabyte Builds First Single-Socket LGA2011 Motherboard With 10 Gb/s Ethernet

By - Source: Gigabyte | B 22 comments

Gigabyte's GA-6PXSVT motherboard is the world's first single-socket GA-6PXSVT motherboard with 10 Gigabit Ethernet.

Gigabyte has announced a rather special motherboard, which while it carries something that we've seen before, now comes in a configuration previously not obtainable.

The Gigabyte GA-6PXSVT is the world's first motherboard with a single LGA 2011 socket to feature integrated 10 Gigabit Ethernet.

Beyond this, the motherboard has support for up to Intel Xeon E5-2600 V2 CPUs, 256 GB of DDR3 ECC 1866 MHz memory (split over eight DIMMs), along with ample storage options. Ample, in this case, means that the board has a total of 10 SATA3 (6 Gb/s) ports, along with another four SATA2 (3 Gb/s) ports. It also features three PCI-Express x16 ports.

Rear I/O connectivity is handled by a legacy PS/2 port, two USB 2.0 ports, four USB 3.0 ports, a VGA port, a serial COM port, along with the 10 Gigabit Ethernet port, topped off with another two Gigabit Ethernet ports, also Intel-made.

There was no word on what the board would cost or when it would become available, though we can imagine that few folks will be calling it affordable.

Discuss
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  • -7 Hide
    soldier44 , March 11, 2014 5:47 PM
    Nice and all but no ISP supports this as yet and by the time they do another generation of MBs will be out.
  • 2 Hide
    Gillerer , March 11, 2014 6:17 PM
    I think it's much more likely this will be connected directly to a corporate intranet, rather than to your average ISP.
  • 0 Hide
    jimmysmitty , March 11, 2014 6:32 PM
    Quote:
    I think it's much more likely this will be connected directly to a corporate intranet, rather than to your average ISP.


    True but it still doesn't make it useful. Most networks are still on 1Gbe at best as 10Gbe is still pretty expensive and there are still no 10Gbe routers out yet.
  • 3 Hide
    thundervore , March 11, 2014 6:38 PM
    I was excited about this until I realized that consumer 10Gb\s switches still cost an arm and a leg.So something like this is only good for an enterprise environment :( 
  • 2 Hide
    fil1p , March 11, 2014 6:53 PM
    Quote:
    Nice and all but no ISP supports this as yet and by the time they do another generation of MBs will be out.
    It doesn't matter if the ISP supports it or not as this will primarily be used on a local network, between the workstation and something like a storage server. Heck this could even be used as a server, and if its priced right it could be pretty sweet deal for a motherboard with 10GBE onboard.
  • 3 Hide
    bison88 , March 11, 2014 6:57 PM
    Shame it wasn't 10GbE as people usually refer to it outside the networking world. Meaning copper not SPF+ only with 2 x 1GbE ports on the side (nice feature).This ain't going to be for even your enthusiast, but it has to start somewhere. Amazing how 10GbE is 10 years old and still costs $500+ for a drop in card.
  • 2 Hide
    SteelCity1981 , March 11, 2014 7:30 PM
    transferring at 1.2 gigabyte per second on a 10 gigabit lan is pretty good speed if I say so myself.
  • 0 Hide
    CaedenV , March 11, 2014 7:32 PM
    I was really surprised that this tech did not hit consumers some 3-5 years ago! Finally it is here!Definitely a must for my next build!Next time I'll turn my current rig into the server and I will finally have the option to have a nice tiny game/production rig with a minimal of storage. It will be perfect!
  • 0 Hide
    firefoxx04 , March 11, 2014 7:49 PM
    Most people have a hard time doing over 5MB/s.. so anyone thinking this is for WAN networks, you are wrong. I would love to have one of these in my rig and on my server to take full advantage of my RAID setups. Makes backups a little quicker.
  • 0 Hide
    livebriand , March 11, 2014 8:06 PM
    I get the feeling this is meant to be a server board, not a consumer-level one. Gigabit in consumer products is over a decade old, come on guys, why not work on getting 10gige in consumer products?
  • 0 Hide
    InvalidError , March 11, 2014 8:55 PM
    Quote:
    Gigabit in consumer products is over a decade old, come on guys, why not work on getting 10gige in consumer products?

    Actually, consumer GbE is almost exactly 10 years old: 2004 is the year where GbE started becoming more common in upper-tier consumer motherboards. It did not become nearly universal until late-2005.
  • 0 Hide
    eriko , March 11, 2014 9:17 PM
    Quote:
    Nice and all but no ISP supports this as yet and by the time they do another generation of MBs will be out.
    Not even remotely true...I build networks for Carriers, and I / we can sell you 100's of Gb/s of line bit rate. Even whole multi-Tb/s networks.But how deep are you pockets?I do see a use for this motherboard though, if you are running high-bit-rate services, think multiple backups, databases, file servers, you can exceed the 800, or so Mb/s you practically get out of GigEthernet, and for some, setting up Port Aggregation over multiple GigE links is difficult, especially between different equipment vendors, and thus a single 10GigE link could be simpler to implement. Try pricing a new C3750X switch though, you computer will seem rather cheap...
  • 0 Hide
    knowom , March 11, 2014 9:25 PM
    10GbE is probably just about to go mainstream soon potentially hard to say. Wireless internet is getting to the point now where it's got more bandwidth than your standard 1000mb NIC's built into any motherboard made in the last what 5+ years. I think wireless internet will only continue to improve and speed up further and will likely replace wired networking entirely outside of the realm of optical crossover cable connections for servers where both speed and latency is a little more critical.
  • 0 Hide
    InvalidError , March 11, 2014 9:45 PM
    Quote:
    10GbE is probably just about to go mainstream soon potentially hard to say. Wireless internet is getting to the point now where it's got more bandwidth than your standard 1000mb NIC's built into any motherboard made in the last what 5+ years.

    What wireless internet are you talking about? I'm not aware of any form of consumer wireless access that goes anywhere near 1Gbps and with the crazy billing rates for wireless data, people would go bankrupt using a hypothetical 1Gbps LTE access. If you meant WiFi routers, those can only do up to 900Mbps half-duplex per band and that includes tons of dead time which leaves less than 400Mbps usable, less than half what you would need to make 1GbE break a sweat.
  • 0 Hide
    tului , March 12, 2014 1:53 AM
    If we could get home routers/switches with 4 1Gbps ports, 1 10Gbps port and a 1Gbps WAN port this would be awesome for a file server.
  • 0 Hide
    ntgam1ng , March 12, 2014 9:58 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    10GbE is probably just about to go mainstream soon potentially hard to say. Wireless internet is getting to the point now where it's got more bandwidth than your standard 1000mb NIC's built into any motherboard made in the last what 5+ years.
    What wireless internet are you talking about? I'm not aware of any form of consumer wireless access that goes anywhere near 1Gbps and with the crazy billing rates for wireless data, people would go bankrupt using a hypothetical 1Gbps LTE access. If you meant WiFi routers, those can only do up to 900Mbps half-duplex per band and that includes tons of dead time which leaves less than 400Mbps usable, less than half what you would need to make 1GbE break a sweat.
    He said wireless as in wifi bro
  • 0 Hide
    festerovic , March 12, 2014 3:31 PM
    Um, wouldn't this be fantastic for a video editing workstation connected to LAN storage? I am salivating at upgrading my small lab with these, depending on cost. Also, the typical cost for a 10gbe card has gone down to around $300. Routers/switches still around $2k+ If you move data for a living, the time for AT LEAST 10gbe is now. I wonder what card they adapted for on-board.
  • 0 Hide
    razor512 , March 12, 2014 3:55 PM
    The 1gigabit standard should have gone away a long time ago. It is sad that router companies are not making consumer level routers with at least 4, 10 gigabit ethernet ports. The WAN port can remain gigabit to save cost, but 10 gigabit LAN is a must.My cheap NAS system is already maxing out the gigabit connection for both reads and writes, with a low CPU usage. To match the max speed of my drives in the array, I would need 4 gigabits. 10 gigabits will offer a good amount of headroom for future expansion.PS teaming is useless. I have tried it, and it only works if both systems use teaming and if the transfer is broken into multiple parts for multiple simultaneous connections.Sadly networking companies are still price gouging on 10 gigabit hardware. Seriously, $1546 for a 12 port 10 gigabit switch... 10 giabit switches should be in the $100 price range, and not this price gouging crap.
  • 0 Hide
    Dennis Wood , March 12, 2014 5:54 PM
    This is not the first single socket with embedded 10GbE. You can buy this (I did) for $500 from Supermicro: http://www.supermicro.com/products/motherboard/Xeon/C600/X9SRH-7TF.cfm
  • 1 Hide
    InvalidError , March 12, 2014 6:18 PM
    Quote:
    10 giabit switches should be in the $100 price range, and not this price gouging crap.

    Doing 10Gbps over up to 100m (328') of wiring is a very different challenge next to doing 8Gbps over 0.3m within a PC or ~2m with USB3. The ADCs, DACs and DSP power to modulate and demodulate a PAM16 signal with over 500MHz of baseband signal bandwidth per pair does not come cheap even today. Most of the cost of doing 10GBase-T is the analog stuff.
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